8 found
Order:
  1.  7
    Beyond Consent in Research.Emily Bell, Eric Racine, Paula Chiasson, Maya Dufourcq-Brana, Laura B. Dunn, Joseph J. Fins, Paul J. Ford, Walter Glannon, Nir Lipsman, Mary Ellen Macdonald, Debra J. H. Mathews & Mary Pat Mcandrews - 2014 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (3):361-368.
    Vulnerability is an important criterion to assess the ethical justification of the inclusion of participants in research trials. Currently, vulnerability is often understood as an attribute inherent to a participant by nature of a diagnosed condition. Accordingly, a common ethical concern relates to the participant’s decisionmaking capacity and ability to provide free and informed consent. We propose an expanded view of vulnerability that moves beyond a focus on consent and the intrinsic attributes of participants. We offer specific suggestions for how (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  2.  2
    Why Is Therapeutic Misconception So Prevalent?Charles W. Lidz, Karen Albert, Paul Appelbaum, Laura B. Dunn, Eve Overton & Ekaterina Pivovarova - 2015 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 24 (2):231-241.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  3.  11
    Psychiatry Residents' Attitudes on Ethics and Professionalism: Multisite Survey Results.Laura Weiss Roberts, Laura B. Dunn, Jinger G. Hoop & Shaili Jain - 2010 - Ethics and Behavior 20 (1):10-20.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  3
    “A Feeling That You’Re Helping”: Proxy Decision Making for Alzheimer’s Research.Laura B. Dunn, Jinger G. Hoop, Sahana Misra, Stephanie R. Fisher & Laura Weiss Roberts - 2011 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 1 (2):107-122.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  8
    Shaping Medical Students' Attitudes Toward Ethically Important Aspects of Clinical Research: Results of a Randomized, Controlled Educational Intervention.Laura Weiss Roberts, Teddy D. Warner, Laura B. Dunn, Janet L. Brody, Katherine Green Hammond & Brian B. Roberts - 2007 - Ethics and Behavior 17 (1):19 – 50.
    The effects of research ethics training on medical students' attitudes about clinical research are examined. A preliminary randomized controlled trial evaluated 2 didactic approaches to ethics training compared to a no-intervention control. The participant-oriented intervention emphasized subjective experiences of research participants (empathy focused). The criteria-oriented intervention emphasized specific ethical criteria for analyzing protocols (analytic focused). Compared to controls, those in the participant-oriented intervention group exhibited greater attunement to research participants' attitudes related to altruism, trust, quality of relationships with researchers, desire (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  2
    Shaping Medical Students' Attitudes Toward Ethically Important Aspects of Clinical Research: Results of a Randomized, Controlled Educational Intervention.Laura Weiss Roberts, Teddy D. Warner, Laura B. Dunn, Janet L. Brody, Katherine A. Green Hammond & Brian B. Roberts - 2007 - Ethics and Behavior 17 (1):19-50.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  1
    Decisional Capacity to Consent to Research in Schizophrenia: An Examination of Errors.Allison R. Kaup, Laura B. Dunn, Elyn R. Saks, Dilip V. Jeste & Barton W. Palmer - 2011 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 33 (4):1.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Effective Use of Consent Forms and Interactive Questions in the Consent Process.Barton W. Palmer, Erin L. Cassidy, Laura B. Dunn, Adam P. Spira & Javaid I. Sheikh - 2008 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 30 (2):8.
    Although written consent forms are standard in clinical research, there is little regulatory or empirical guidance regarding how to most effectively review consent forms with potential participants. We developed an algorithm for embedding five questions with corrective feedback while reading consent forms with potential participants, and then applied it in the context of seven clinical research studies. A substantial proportion of participants within each protocol displayed initially inadequate responses to at least one question, but after the protocol elements were explained (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography