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  1.  2
    A Comparison of Wolff’s and Kant’s Receptions of Emanuel Swedenborg.Laura Follesa - 2021 - Kant-Studien 112 (1):1-22.
    Kant’s Dreams of a Spirit-Seer did not provide the sole perspective through which Emanuel Swedenborg’s work was known in Germany in the eighteenth century. Before Kant, another German philosopher was interested in Swedenborg from a completely different perspective: Christian Wolff. On the one hand, this paper analyzes the meaning of Wolff’s anonymous reviews of Swedenborg’s early writings published in Acta Eruditorum, the authorship of which was only recently discovered, in order to show Swedenborg’s intertwinement with German scholars during the 1720s. (...)
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  2. Il progetto di recerca "Biblioteche filosofiche private in età moderna e contemporanea".Laura Follesa - 2011 - Giornale Critico Della Filosofia Italiana 7 (2):447-449.
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    Learning and Vision: Johann Gottfried Herder on Memory.Laura Follesa - 2018 - Essays in Philosophy 19 (2):196-212.
    A consistent thread throughout Johann Gottfried Herder’s thought is his interest in human knowledge and in its origins. Although he never formulated a systematic theory of knowledge, elements of one are disseminated in his writings, from the early manuscript Plato sagte to one of his last works, the periodical Adrastea. Herder assigned a very special function to memory and to the related idea of a recollection of “images,” as they play a pivotal role in the formation of personal identity. He (...)
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  4. Platonism: Ficino to Foucault.Valery Rees, Anna Corrias, Francesca M. Crasta, Laura Follesa & Guido Giglioni (eds.) - 2020 - Brill.
    Platonism, Ficino to Foucault explores some key chapters in the history Platonic philosophy from the revival of Plato in the fifteenth century to the new reading of Platonic dialogues promoted by the so-called ‘Critique of Modernity’.
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