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  1.  5
    Complex Decisions.Laura Haupt - 2022 - Hastings Center Report 52 (6):2-2.
    Essays and articles in the November‐December 2022 issue of the Hastings Center Report explore the complexities of medical decision‐making. A case‐study essay, for example, argues that the dismaying decision to perform resuscitation efforts on a patient who had obviously been dead for some time can be understood in the context of the harmful practice of defensive medicine. A narrative essay concerns whether an adolescent with locked‐in syndrome should be asked her wishes about life‐sustaining interventions, and the articles illuminate the ethical (...)
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  2.  13
    Authenticity and Clinical Decision‐Making.Laura Haupt - 2022 - Hastings Center Report 52 (1):2-2.
    Hastings Center Report, Volume 52, Issue 1, Page 2-2, January/February 2022.
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  3.  5
    Ethics Big and Small, Thinking Fast and Slow.Laura Haupt - 2022 - Hastings Center Report 52 (4):2-2.
    In the Hastings Center Report's July‐August 2022 issue, articles by Jessica Amalraj and Kavita Shah Arora and by Inmaculada de Melo‐Martín take up very different concerns under the broad topic of reproductive ethics and public policy. Amalraj and Arora call for public deliberation and consensus building to revise a Medicaid sterilization policy, and de Melo‐Martín argues that social resources should not be used to support reproductive embryo editing but should instead be put toward pre‐ and postnatal interventions that, compared to (...)
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  4.  5
    Justice through a Wide‐Angle Lens.Laura Haupt - 2021 - Hastings Center Report 51 (3):2-2.
    In the lead article of the May‐June 2021 issue of the Hastings Center Report, Nancy Jecker and Caesar Atuire argue that the Covid‐19 crisis is best understood as a syndemic, “a convergence of biosocial forces that interact with one another to produce and exacerbate clinical disease and prognosis.” A syndemic framework, the authors advise, will enable bioethicists to recognize the ethical principles that should guide efforts to reduce the unequal effects that Covid‐19 has on populations. Drawing on sub‐Saharan African conceptions (...)
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  5.  13
    Patient Welfare and Trust.Laura Haupt - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (1):2-2.
    This January‐February 2020 issue marks the start of the Hastings Center Report's fiftieth volume. The issue introduces the column Looking Back, Looking Forward, which we plan to run in this volume only. Conceived by Hastings Center fellows Douglas Diekema and Lainie Friedman Ross, the column will explore the significance of landmark publications from the first fifty years of bioethics. For the first installment, Diekema looks at the unconventional moral position Hans Jonas took in his 1969 essay “Philosophical Reflections on Experimenting (...)
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  6.  6
    Rescue via Genetic Findings.Laura Haupt - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (3):2-2.
    Two articles in this issue of the Hastings Center Report (May‐June 2018) argue that having knowledge of genetic mutations can entail a moral responsibility to rescue others. In the lead article, Madison Kilbride, a philosopher at the Perelman School of Medicine, assigns to the patient, under certain conditions, a task physicians are prohibited from taking on without patient consent: to disclose a finding of a serious, clinically actionable genetic mutation to the patient's relatives who are likely to have the same (...)
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  7.  7
    Space for the Prisoner's Point of View.Laura Haupt - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (2):2-2.
    The lead article in this issue discusses a potentially free metaphorical space—that of decision-making—within the confines, tangible and intangible, of life in jail or prison. By interviewing prisoner-participants from six clinical studies, Paul Christopher and colleagues sought to find out how these men and women would answer open-ended questions about their decision to enroll in the research. What the interviewers heard was that none saw themselves as having been inappropriately pressured to do so. In fact, a significant percentage of the (...)
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  8.  14
    Thinking Together.Laura Haupt & Gregory E. Kaebnick - 2019 - Hastings Center Report 49 (4):2-2.
    Over email a few days after the death of Daniel Callahan, cofounder of The Hastings Center and for many years its director and then president, Joseph Fins, a longtime Hastings colleague, offered this comfort: “[H]enceforth every issue of the Report is a living memorial to Dan the writer, editor, and institution builder.” In the Hastings Center Report's first issue, published in June 1971, Dan stated, “To say that [the work of the Report] must be multi‐disciplinary is only to say the (...)
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  9.  14
    Learning from a Pandemic.Gregory E. Kaebnick & Laura Haupt - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (3):3-3.
    The Covid‐19 pandemic has highlighted connections between health and social structural phenomena that have long been recognized in bioethics but have never really been front and center—not just access to health care, but fundamental conditions of living that affect public health, from income inequality to political and environmental conditions. In March, as the pandemic spread globally, the field's traditional focus on health care and health policy, medical research, and biotechnology no longer seemed enough. The adequacy of bioethics seemed even less (...)
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