Results for 'Laura M. Pönkänen'

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  1.  18
    [Book Review] Children of Choice, Freedom and the New Reproductive Technologies. [REVIEW]Laura M. Purdy - 1996 - Criminal Justice Ethics 15 (1):67-74.
  2.  14
    Exploring Understanding of “Understanding”: The Paradigm Case of Biobank Consent Comprehension.Laura M. Beskow & Kevin P. Weinfurt - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (5):6-18.
    Data documenting poor understanding among research participants and real-time efforts to assess comprehension in large-scale studies are focusing new attention on informed consent comprehension. Within the context of biobanking consent, we previously convened a multidisciplinary panel to reach consensus about what information must be understood for a prospective participant’s consent to be considered valid. Subsequently, we presented them with data from another study showing that many U.S. adults would fail to comprehend the information the panel had deemed essential. When asked (...)
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  3.  58
    Children of Choice: Freedom and the New Reproductive Technologies.Laura M. Purdy - 1996 - Ethics 106 (2):474-476.
  4. Genetics and Reproductive Risk : Can Having Children Be Immoral?Laura M. Purdy - 2010 - In Craig Hanks (ed.), Technology and Values: Essential Readings. Wiley-Blackwell.
  5. Surrogate Mothering:Exploitation or Empowerment?Laura M. Purdy - 1989 - Bioethics 3 (1):18–34.
  6. Are Pregnant Women Fetal Containers?Laura M. Purdy - 1990 - Bioethics 4 (4):273–291.
  7.  13
    Measure Development and the Hermeneutic Task.Laura M. Cupples - 2019 - Synthese 198 (3):2375-2390.
    I examine the dynamics of measure development using two case studies: temperature, and health-related quality of life. I argue, following Bas van Fraassen and Leah McClimans that in each case these dynamics have a hermeneutic structure. Measure development is plagued by epistemic circularity, as is the task of interpreting a text, and similar strategies can be used in both measure development and hermeneutics to overcome that circularity. I show that Hans Georg Gadamer’s philosophical hermeneutics in particular are an effective lens (...)
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  8.  10
    The Christian Consumer: Living Faithfully in a Fragile World.Laura M. Hartman - 2012 - Oup Usa.
    Consumption--the flow of physical materials in human lives--is an important ethical issue. Be it fair trade coffee or foreign oil, North Americans' consumption choices affect the well-being of humans around the globe, in addition to impacting the natural world and consumers themselves. In this book, Laura Hartman seeks to formulate a coherent Christian ethic of consumption.
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  9.  11
    Climate Engineering and the Playing God Critique.Laura M. Hartman - 2017 - Ethics and International Affairs 31 (3):313-333.
    Climate engineering is subject to the “playing God” critique, which charges that humans should not undertake to control nature in ways that seem to overstep the proper scope of human agency. This argument is easily discredited, and in fact the opposite—that we should “play God”—may be equally valid in some circumstances. To revive the playing God critique, I argue that it functions not on a logical but on a symbolic and emotional level to highlight nostalgia for functional dualisms in the (...)
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  10.  10
    Are Pregnant Women Fetal Containers?Laura M. Purdy - 1990 - Bioethics 4 (4):273-291.
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  11.  4
    Expert Perspectives on Oversight for Unregulated mHealth Research: Empirical Data and Commentary.Laura M. Beskow, Catherine M. Hammack-Aviran, Kathleen M. Brelsford & P. Pearl O'Rourke - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (S1):138-146.
    In qualitative interviews with a diverse group of experts, the vast majority believed unregulated researchers should seek out independent oversight. Reasons included the need for objectivity, protecting app users from research risks, and consistency in standards for the ethical conduct of research. Concerns included burdening minimal risk research and limitations in current systems of oversight. Literature and analysis supports the use of IRBs even when not required by regulations, and the need for evidence-based improvements in IRB processes.
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  12.  11
    Graded Semantic and Phonological Similarity Effects in Priming: Evidence for a Distributed Connectionist Approach to Morphology.Laura M. Gonnerman, Mark S. Seidenberg & Elaine S. Andersen - 2007 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 136 (2):323-345.
  13.  30
    What Feminism Can Do for Bioethics.Laura M. Purdy - 2001 - Health Care Analysis 9 (2):117-132.
    Feminist criticism of health care and ofbioethics has become increasingly rich andsophisticated in the last years of thetwentieth century. Nonetheless, this body ofwork remains quite marginalized. I believe thatthere are (at least) two reasons for this.First, many people are still confused aboutfeminism. Second, many people are unconvincedthat significant sexism still exists and aretherefore unreceptive to arguments that itshould be remedied if there is no largerbenefit. In this essay I argue for a thin,``core'' conception of feminism that is easy tounderstand and (...)
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  14.  20
    Eye Contact with Neutral and Smiling Faces: Effects on Autonomic Responses and Frontal EEG Asymmetry.Laura M. Pönkänen & Jari K. Hietanen - 2012 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.
  15.  18
    The “Reasonable Person” Standard for Research Informed Consent.Laura M. Odwazny & Benjamin E. Berkman - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (7):49-51.
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  16.  5
    Consent for Acute Care Research and the Regulatory “Gray Zone”.Laura M. Beskow, Christopher J. Lindsell & Todd W. Rice - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (5):26-28.
    Volume 20, Issue 5, June 2020, Page 26-28.
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  17.  5
    Disability, Epistemic Harms, and the Quality-Adjusted Life Year.Laura M. Cupples - 2020 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 13 (1):46-62.
    Health policymakers employ utility measures to inform resource allocation decisions. They often rely on a conceptual tool called the quality-adjusted life year that discounts the value of years lived in a state of disability relative to years lived in full health. A representative sample of the general public is asked to place values on hypothetical health states as part of a standard gamble or time trade-off task. Policymakers use the resulting values to calculate the number of QALYs gained through particular (...)
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  18.  23
    Attentional Control Mediates the Relationship Between Social Anhedonia and Social Impairment.Laura M. Tully, Sarah Hope Lincoln & Christine I. Hooker - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  19.  7
    Return of Genetic Research Results to Participants and Families: IRB Perspectives and Roles.Laura M. Beskow & P. Pearl O'Rourke - 2015 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (3):502-513.
    We surveyed IRB chairs' perspectives on offering individual genetic research results to participants and families, including family members of deceased participants, and the IRB's role in addressing these issues. Given a particular hypothetical scenario, respondents favored offering results to participants but not family members, giving choices at the time of initial consent, and honoring elicited choices. They felt IRBs should have authority regarding the process issues, but a more limited role in medical and scientific issues.
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  20.  12
    Points to Consider: The Research Ethics Consultation Service and the IRB.Laura M. Beskow, Christine Grady, Ana S. Iltis, John Z. Sadler & Benjamin S. Wilfond - 2009 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 31 (6):1.
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  21.  23
    Environmental Modesty.Laura M. Hartman - 2015 - Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (3):475-492.
    Despite this virtue's history as an instrument of women's oppression, modesty, at its most basic, means voluntary restraint of one's power, undertaken for the sake of others. It is a mechanism that modifies unequal power relationships and encourages greater compassion and fairness. I use a Christian perspective with influences from Jewish and Muslim sources to examine modesty. The modest person, I argue, must be in relationship with others, must be honestly aware of her impacts on others, must be sensitive to (...)
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  22.  31
    Research Participants’ Understanding of and Reactions to Certificates of Confidentiality.Laura M. Beskow, Devon K. Check & Natalie Ammarell - 2014 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 5 (1):12-22.
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  23.  14
    Patients' Choices for Return of Exome Sequencing Results to Relatives in the Event of Their Death.Laura M. Amendola, Martha Horike-Pyne, Susan B. Trinidad, Stephanie M. Fullerton, Barbara J. Evans, Wylie Burke & Gail P. Jarvik - 2015 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (3):476-485.
    The informed consent process for genetic testing does not commonly address preferences regarding disclosure of results in the event of the patient's death. Adults being tested for familial colorectal cancer were asked whether they want their exome sequencing results disclosed to another person in the event of their death prior to receiving the results. Of 78 participants, 92% designated an individual and 8% declined to. Further research will help refine practices for informed consent.
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  24.  35
    In Defense of Hiring Apparently Less Qualified Women.Laura M. Purdy - 1984 - Journal of Social Philosophy 15 (2):26-33.
  25.  30
    Explaining Derivational Morphology as the Convergence of Codes.Mark S. Seidenberg & Laura M. Gonnerman - 2000 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (9):353-361.
  26.  7
    Considering the Nature of Individual Research Results.Laura M. Beskow - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (6):38 – 40.
  27.  23
    Feminists Healing Ethics.Laura M. Purdy - 1989 - Hypatia 4 (2):9 - 14.
    The field of ethics is enjoying a much-needed renaissance. Traditional theories and approaches are appropriately coming under fire, although not every new idea will stand time's test. Feminist thinking suggests that we at least emphasize the importance of women and their interests, focus on issues specially affecting women, rethink fundamental assumptions, incorporate feminist insights and conclusions from other areas, and be consistent with respect to our concerns about equality by paying attention to race and class.
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  28.  40
    Why Do We Need Affirmative Action?Laura M. Purdy - 1994 - Journal of Social Philosophy 25 (1):133-143.
  29.  15
    IRB Chairs' Perspectives on Genotype-Driven Research Recruitment.Laura M. Beskow, Emily E. Namey, Patrick R. Miller, Daniel K. Nelson & Alexandra Cooper - 2012 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 34 (3):1.
    Recruiting research participants based on genetic information generated about them in a prior study is a potentially powerful way to study the functional significance of human genetic variation, but it also presents ethical challenges. To inform policy development on this issue, we conducted a survey of U.S. institutional review board chairs concerning the acceptability of recontacting genetic research participants about additional research and their views on the disclosure of individual genetic results as part of recruitment. Our findings suggest there is (...)
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  30.  26
    Informed Consent in Translational Genomics: Insufficient Without Trustworthy Governance.Wylie Burke, Laura M. Beskow, Susan Brown Trinidad, Stephanie M. Fullerton & Kathleen Brelsford - 2018 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 46 (1):79-86.
    Neither the range of potential results from genomic research that might be returned to participants nor future uses of stored data and biospecimens can be fully predicted at the outset of a study. Informed consent procedures require clear explanations about how and by whom decisions are made and what principles and criteria apply. To ensure trustworthy research governance, there is also a need for empirical studies incorporating public input to evaluate and strengthen these processes.
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  31.  13
    An Exploration of Empowerment Discourse Within Home-Care Nurses’ Accounts of Practice.Laura M. Funk, Kelli I. Stajduhar & Mary Ellen Purkis - 2011 - Nursing Inquiry 18 (1):66-76.
  32.  3
    Points to Consider: The Research Ethics Consultation Service and the IRB.Benjamin S. Wilfond Laura M. Beskow, Christine Grady, Ana S. Iltis, John Z. Sadler - 2009 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 31 (6):1.
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  33.  6
    An Emerging Research Framework for Studying Informal Learning and Schools.Laura M. W. Martin - 2004 - Science Education 88 (S1):S71 - S82.
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  34.  14
    The Role of Personality Traits in Young Adult Fruit and Vegetable Consumption.Tamlin S. Conner, Laura M. Thompson, Rachel L. Knight, Jayde A. M. Flett, Aimee C. Richardson & Kate L. Brookie - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  35.  18
    Shape Constancy and Theory of Mind: Is There a Link?Peter Mitchell & Laura M. Taylor - 1999 - Cognition 70 (2):167-190.
  36.  19
    From What Age Is Mental Rotation Training Effective? Differences in Preschool Age but Not in Sex.Laura M. Fernández-Méndez, María José Contreras & M. Rosa Elosúa - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  37.  9
    How Do French–English Bilinguals Pull Verb Particle Constructions Off? Factors Influencing Second Language Processing of Unfamiliar Structures at the Syntax-Semantics Interface.Alexandre C. Herbay, Laura M. Gonnerman & Shari R. Baum - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  38.  23
    Neighborhood Disadvantage and Adolescent Stress Reactivity.Daniel A. Hackman, Laura M. Betancourt, Nancy L. Brodsky, Hallam Hurt & Martha J. Farah - 2012 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.
  39.  6
    Unregulated Health Research Using Mobile Devices: Ethical Considerations and Policy Recommendations.Mark A. Rothstein, John T. Wilbanks, Laura M. Beskow, Kathleen M. Brelsford, Kyle B. Brothers, Megan Doerr, Barbara J. Evans, Catherine M. Hammack-Aviran, Michelle L. McGowan & Stacey A. Tovino - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (S1):196-226.
    Mobile devices with health apps, direct-to-consumer genetic testing, crowd-sourced information, and other data sources have enabled research by new classes of researchers. Independent researchers, citizen scientists, patient-directed researchers, self-experimenters, and others are not covered by federal research regulations because they are not recipients of federal financial assistance or conducting research in anticipation of a submission to the FDA for approval of a new drug or medical device. This article addresses the difficult policy challenge of promoting the welfare and interests of (...)
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  40.  29
    Returning a Research Participant's Genomic Results to Relatives: Analysis and Recommendations.Susan M. Wolf, Rebecca Branum, Barbara A. Koenig, Gloria M. Petersen, Susan A. Berry, Laura M. Beskow, Mary B. Daly, Conrad V. Fernandez, Robert C. Green, Bonnie S. LeRoy, Noralane M. Lindor, P. Pearl O'Rourke, Carmen Radecki Breitkopf, Mark A. Rothstein, Brian Van Ness & Benjamin S. Wilfond - 2015 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (3):440-463.
    Genomic research results and incidental findings with health implications for a research participant are of potential interest not only to the participant, but also to the participant's family. Yet investigators lack guidance on return of results to relatives, including after the participant's death. In this paper, a national working group offers consensus analysis and recommendations, including an ethical framework to guide investigators in managing this challenging issue, before and after the participant's death.
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  41. A Call to Heal Ethics.Laura M. Purdy - 1992 - In Helen B. Holmes & Laura Purdy (eds.), Feminist Perspectives in Medical Ethics. Indiana University Press. pp. 8--13.
     
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  42.  31
    A Response to Dodds and Jones.Laura M. Purdy - 1989 - Bioethics 3 (1):40–44.
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  43. Beneficent Euthanasia. [REVIEW]Laura M. Purdy - 1977 - Philosophical Review 86 (1):121-123.
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  44.  15
    Does Women's Liberation Imply Children's Liberation?Laura M. Purdy - 1988 - Hypatia 3 (2):49 - 62.
    Shulamith Firestone argues that for women to embrace equal rights without recognizing them for children is unjust. Protection of children is merely repressive control: they are infantilized by our treatment of them. I maintain that many children no longer get much protection, but neither are they being provided with an environment conducive to learning prudence or morality. Recognizing equal rights for children is likely to worsen this situation, not make it better.
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  45. Good Bioethics Must Be Feminist Bioethics.Laura M. Purdy - 1996 - In Wayne L. Sumner & Joseph Boyle (eds.), Philosophical Perspectives on Bioethics. University of Toronto Press. pp. 143-162.
     
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  46.  51
    How Many Gods Does It Take? (To Discredit the Divine Command Theory).Laura M. Purdy - 1988 - Teaching Philosophy 11 (2):112-115.
  47.  38
    Is It Morally Permissible for Me to Have Children? A Decision to Procreate is Surely One of the Most Significant Decisions a Person Can Make. So It Would Seem That It Ought Not to Be Made Without Some Moral Soul-Searching.Laura M. Purdy - forthcoming - Bioethics.
  48.  7
    In Women's Voices.Laura M. Purdy - 1991 - Hastings Center Report 21 (6):41-42.
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  49. In Women's VoicesFeminist Ethics.Laura M. Purdy & Claudia Card - 1991 - Hastings Center Report 21 (6):41.
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  50.  3
    Pronatalism Is Violence Against Women: The Role of Genetics.Laura M. Purdy - 2019 - In Wanda Teays (ed.), Analyzing Violence Against Women. Springer. pp. 113-129.
    Pronatalism—the social bias toward having children—is at the core of much violence against women. Its chief characteristic, and its moral Achilles heel, is that it undermines autonomous decision-making about childbearing. Together with its soulmates misogyny and geneticism, it harms children, male partners, and humanity as a whole, given the serious environmental challenges now facing us. But, of course, biology requires women to gestate offspring, and women are generally expected to be responsible for childrearing. Female gender roles incorporate these facts, and (...)
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