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Laura P. Hartman [27]Laura Pincus Hartman [3]
  1.  44
    Ethics, CSR, and Sustainability Education in the Financial Times Top 50 Global Business Schools: Baseline Data and Future Research Directions.Lisa Jones Christensen, Ellen Peirce, Laura P. Hartman, W. Michael Hoffman & Jamie Carrier - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 73 (4):347-368.
    This paper investigates how deans and directors at the top 50 global MBA programs (as rated by the "Financial Times" in their 2006 Global MBA rankings) respond to questions about the inclusion and coverage of the topics of ethics, corporate social responsibility, and sustainability at their respective institutions. This work purposely investigates each of the three topics separately. Our findings reveal that: (1) a majority of the schools require that one or more of these topics be covered in their MBA (...)
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  2.  33
    Exploring the Ethics and Economics of Global Labor Standards: A Challenge to Integrated Social Contract Theory.Laura P. Hartman, Bill Shaw & Rodney Stevenson - 2003 - Business Ethics Quarterly 13 (2):193-220.
    The challenge that confronts corporate decision-makers in connection with global labor conditions is often in identifying the standardsby which they should govern themselves. In an effort to provide greater direction in the face of possible global cultural conflicts, ethicistsThomas Donaldson and Thomas Dunfee draw on social contract theory to develop a method for identifying basic human rights: Integrated Social Contract Theory . In this paper, we apply ISCT to the challenge of global labor standards, attempting to identify labor rights that (...)
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  3.  16
    Building Partnerships to Create Social and Economic Value at the Base of the Global Development Pyramid.Jerry M. Calton, Patricia H. Werhane, Laura P. Hartman & David Bevan - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 117 (4):721-733.
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  4.  72
    Beyond Sweatshops: Positive Deviancy and Global Labour Practices.Denis G. Arnold & Laura P. Hartman - 2005 - Business Ethics 14 (3):206–222.
  5.  13
    Beyond Sweatshops: Positive Deviancy and Global Labour Practices.Denis G. Arnold & Laura P. Hartman - 2005 - Business Ethics: A European Review 14 (3):206-222.
  6.  20
    Moral Imagination and the Future of Sweatshops.Denis G. Arnold & Laura P. Hartman - 2003 - Business and Society Review 108 (4):425-461.
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  7.  38
    The Communication of Corporate Social Responsibility: United States and European Union Multinational Corporations.Laura P. Hartman, Robert S. Rubin & K. Kathy Dhanda - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 74 (4):373-389.
    This study explores corporate social responsibility (CSR) by conducting a cross-cultural analysis of communication of CSR activities in a total of 16 U.S. and European corporations. Drawing on previous research contrasting two major approaches to CSR initiatives, it was proposed that U.S. companies would tend to communicate about and justify CSR using economic or bottom-line terms and arguments whereas European companies would rely more heavily on language or theories of citizenship, corporate accountability, or moral commitment. Results supported this expectation of (...)
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  8.  35
    A Modular Approach to Business Ethics Integration: At the Intersection of the Stand-Alone and the Integrated Approaches.Laura P. Hartman & Patricia H. Werhane - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (S3):295 - 300.
    While no one seems to believe that business schools or their faculties bear entire responsibility for the ethical decision-making processes of their students, these same institutions do have some burden of accountability for educating students surrounding these skills. To that end, the standards promulgated by the Association to Advance Collegiate School of Business, their global accrediting body, require that students learn ethics as part of a business degree. However, since the AACSB does not require the inclusion of a specific course (...)
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  9.  34
    The Ethics of Carbon Neutrality: A Critical Examination of Voluntary Carbon Offset Providers.K. Kathy Dhanda & Laura P. Hartman - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 100 (1):119-149.
    In this article, we explore the world's response to the increasing impact of carbon emissions on the sobering threat posed by global warming: the carbon offset market. Though the market is a relatively new one, numerous offset providers have quickly emerged under both regulated and voluntary regimes. Owing to the lack of technical literacy of some stakeholders who participate in the market, no common quality or certification structure has yet emerged for providers. To the contrary, the media warns that a (...)
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  10.  27
    Social Constructivism, Mental Models, and Problems of Obedience.Patricia H. Werhane, Laura P. Hartman, Dennis Moberg, Elaine Englehardt, Michael Pritchard & Bidhan Parmar - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 100 (1):103 - 118.
    There are important synergies for the next generation of ethical leaders based on the alignment of modified or adjusted mental models. This entails a synergistic application of moral imagination through collaborative input and critique, rather than "me too" obedience. In this article, we will analyze the Milgram results using frameworks relating to mental models (Werhane et al., Profitable partnerships for poverty alleviation, 2009), as well as work by Moberg on "ethics blind spots'' (Organizational Studies 27(3): 413-428, 2006), and by Bazerman (...)
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  11.  15
    From Accountability to Action to Amplification: Addressing Our Own Laryngitis.Laura P. Hartman - 2003 - Business Ethics Quarterly 13 (4):563-572.
    The following address considers the relevance of business ethics education to our students. Is our concept of ethics one of practiceand application? And, if so, are we accountable to our students, our institutions and ourselves, for the practical impact that we haveor, conversely, that we do not have? Aren’t we responsible in part if one of our students ventures forth and does not act in an ethicalmanner? Though a positive response to this query may not be popular, what is the (...)
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  12.  11
    How to Teach Ethics.Laura P. Hartman & Edwin M. Hartman - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics Education 1 (2):165-212.
    The American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business has called for stronger ethics programs. There are two problems with this battle cry. First, the AACSB rejects, with weak arguments, the single best way to get ethics into the curriculum. Second, the AACSB can only vaguely describe some unpromising alternatives to that strategy. A number of leading business ethicists have challenged the AACSB to defend and clarify its views, to little avail. The proposed Procedures and Standards cannot by themselves bring about (...)
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  13.  4
    How to Teach Ethics: Assumptions and Arguments.Laura P. Hartman & Edwin M. Hartman - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics Education 1 (2):165-212.
    The American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business has called for stronger ethics programs. There are two problems with this battle cry. First, the AACSB rejects, with weak arguments, the single best way to get ethics into the curriculum. Second, the AACSB can only vaguely describe some unpromising alternatives to that strategy. A number of leading business ethicists have challenged the AACSB to defend and clarify its views, to little avail. The proposed Procedures and Standards cannot by themselves bring about (...)
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  14.  10
    European Perspectives on Business Ethics: A Polyphonic Challenge.David Bevan & Laura P. Hartman - 2007 - Business and Society Review 112 (4):471-476.
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  15.  22
    Teaching Ethics Through a Pedagogical Case Discussion: The McDonald's Case and Poverty Alleviation.Laura P. Hartman, Regina Wolfe & Patricia H. Werhane - 2008 - Teaching Ethics 9 (1):103-133.
  16.  12
    From Accountability to Action to Amplification: Addressing Our Own Laryngitis.Laura P. Hartman - 2003 - Business Ethics Quarterly 13 (4):563-572.
    The following address considers the relevance of business ethics education to our students. Is our concept of ethics one of practiceand application? And, if so, are we accountable to our students, our institutions and ourselves, for the practical impact that we haveor, conversely, that we do not have? Aren’t we responsible in part if one of our students ventures forth and does not act in an ethicalmanner? Though a positive response to this query may not be popular, what is the (...)
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  17.  20
    “Connecting the World Through Games”: Creating Shared Value in the Case of Zynga’s Corporate Social Strategy.Laura P. Hartman, Jenny Mead, Patricia H. Werhane & Danielle Christmas - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics Education 8 (1):199-230.
    When using cases to teach corporate strategy and ethical decision-making, the aim is to demonstrate to students that leadership decision-making is at its most effective when all affected stakeholders are considered, from shareholders and employees, to the local, national, and global societies in which the company operates. This paper challenges the obstructive perception of many Corporate Social Responsibility advocates that the interests of private organizations in the alleviation of social problems should not be vested, but instead should originate from charitable (...)
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  18.  5
    The Economic and Ethical Implications of New Technology on Privacy in the Workplace.Laura Pincus Hartman & Gabriella Bucci - 1999 - Business and Society Review 102 (1):1-24.
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  19.  21
    Sony Online Entertainment: EverQuest® or EverCrack? Oxford Style Debate Presented at Tenth Annual International Conference Promoting Business Ethics.Laura P. Hartman & Moses L. Pava - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 58 (1-3):17-26.
    . Part C of this three part series is the presentation from the Oxford style debate held at the Tenth Annual International Conference Promoting Business Ethics between Laura Hartman, J.D., and Dr. Moses Pava on topics related to the EverQuest® v. EverCrack case. In a traditional Oxford style debate, two debaters take opposing viewpoints and the third debater argues the neutral position. At the Conference, the modified format featured the two debaters presenting diametrically opposing views – corporate responsibility versus personal (...)
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  20.  4
    Cross‐Sector Partnerships: An Examination of Success Factors.Laura Pincus Hartman & Kanwalroop Kathy Dhanda - 2018 - Business and Society Review 123 (1):181-214.
    In this paper, we examine the drivers involved in an alternative business model: cross-sector social partnerships between for-profit, predominantly multinational corporations and nonprofit organizations. We explore these cross-sector social partnerships from the perspective of these primary stakeholders, examining the questions of power differentials and the definitions and determinants of success. In order more deeply to understand these drivers, we review the evolution of the concept of “value” and the perception of the value that each stakeholder brings to the partnership. We (...)
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  21.  10
    Human Resources Opportunities to Balance Ethics and Neoclassical Economics in Global Labor Standards.Laura P. Hartman, Bill Shaw & Rodney Stevenson - 2000 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 19 (3):73-116.
  22.  12
    10.5840/Jbee20118114.Laura P. Hartman, Jenny Mead, Patricia H. Werhane & Danielle Christmas - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics Education 1 (1):199-230.
  23.  11
    Introduction to the Issue.Laura P. Hartman - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics 23 (1):1 - 2.
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  24.  9
    You've Got Mail... And the Boss Knows: A Survey by the Center for Business Ethics of Companies' Email and Internet Monitoring. [REVIEW]W. Michael Hoffman, Laura P. Hartman & Mark Rowe - 2003 - Business and Society Review 108 (3):285-307.
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  25.  3
    Strategic Global Strategy: The Intersection of General Principles, Corporate Responsibility and Economic Value-Added.Laura P. Hartman, Patricia H. Werhane, Cynthia E. Clark, Craig V. Vansandt & Mukesh Sud - 2017 - Business and Society Review 122 (1):71-91.
    An ongoing argument often made by business ethicists is that a singular preoccupation on profitability, will lead, in the long run, to disvalue for all the stakeholders and the communities it affects, and often, economic challenges for the company. On the other hand, we argue, a preoccupation with ethics and CSR as the primary aims of a for-profit company, it is, on its own, like a preoccupation with profitability, unsustainable. Indeed, without economic viability, a company will fail. Both of these (...)
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  26.  7
    You've Got Mail . . . And the Boss Knows: A Survey by the Center for Business Ethics of Companies' Email and Internet Monitoring. [REVIEW]W. Michael Hoffman, Laura P. Hartman & Mark Rowe - 2003 - Business and Society Review 108 (3):285-307.
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  27.  6
    Navigating the Life Cycle of Trust in Developing Economies: One-Size Solutions Do Not Fit All.Laura Pincus Hartman, Julie Gedro & Courtney Masterson - 2015 - Business and Society Review 120 (2):167-204.
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  28. You've Got Mail... And the Boss Knows.W. Michael Hoffman, Laura P. Hartman & Mark Rowe - 2003 - Business and Society Review 108 (3).
     
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