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  1.  22
    Covariation in Natural Causal Induction.Patricia W. Cheng & Laura R. Novick - 1992 - Psychological Review 99 (2):365-382.
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  2.  71
    Causes Versus Enabling Conditions.Patricia W. Cheng & Laura R. Novick - 1991 - Cognition 40 (1-2):83-120.
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  3.  26
    Assessing Interactive Causal Influence.Laura R. Novick & Patricia W. Cheng - 2004 - Psychological Review 111 (2):455-485.
    The discovery of conjunctive causes--factors that act in concert to produce or prevent an effect--has been explained by purely covariational theories. Such theories assume that concomitant variations in observable events directly license causal inferences, without postulating the existence of unobservable causal relations. This article discusses problems with these theories, proposes a causal-power theory that overcomes the problems, and reports empirical evidence favoring the new theory. Unlike earlier models, the new theory derives (a) the conditions under which covariation implies conjunctive causation (...)
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  4.  8
    Constraints and Nonconstraints in Causal Learning: Reply to White and to Luhmann and Ahn.Patricia W. Cheng & Laura R. Novick - 2005 - Psychological Review 112 (3):694-706.
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  5. Linear Versus Branching Depictions of Evolutionary History: Implications for Diagram Design.Laura R. Novick, Courtney K. Shade & Kefyn M. Catley - 2011 - Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (3):536-559.
    This article reports the results of an experiment involving 108 college students with varying backgrounds in biology. Subjects answered questions about the evolutionary history of sets of hominid and equine taxa. Each set of taxa was presented in one of three diagrammatic formats: a noncladogenic diagram found in a contemporary biology textbook or a cladogram in either the ladder or tree format. As predicted, the textbook diagrams, which contained linear components, were more likely than the cladogram formats to yield explanations (...)
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  6.  16
    Understanding Phylogenies in Biology: The Influence of a Gestalt Perceptual Principle.Laura R. Novick & Kefyn M. Catley - 2007 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 13 (4):197-223.
  7.  1
    Cognitive Constraints on Ordering Operations: The Case of Geometric Analogies.Laura R. Novick & Barbara Tversky - 1987 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 116 (1):50-67.
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  8.  15
    Some Determinants of Successful Analogical Transfer in the Solution of Algebra Word Problems.Laura R. Novick - 1995 - Thinking and Reasoning 1 (1):5 – 30.
  9.  6
    Postscript.Patricia W. Cheng & Laura R. Novick - 2005 - Psychological Review 112 (3):706-707.
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  10.  25
    Context and Structure: The Nature of Students' Knowledge About Three Spatial Diagram Representations.Sean M. Hurley & Laura R. Novick - 2006 - Thinking and Reasoning 12 (3):281 – 308.
    The authors investigated whether college students possess abstract rules concerning the applicability conditions for three spatial diagrams that are important tools for thinking—matrices, networks, and hierarchies. A total of 127 students were asked to select which type of diagram would be best for organising the information in each of several short scenarios. The scenarios were written using three different story contexts: (a) neutral, presenting a real-life situation but not cueing a particular representation; (b) abstract, presenting only variable names and relations; (...)
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  11. Inference Is Bliss: Using Evolutionary Relationship to Guide Categorical Inferences.Laura R. Novick, Kefyn M. Catley & Daniel J. Funk - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (4):712-743.
    Three experiments, adopting an evolutionary biology perspective, investigated subjects’ inferences about living things. Subjects were told that different enzymes help regulate cell function in two taxa and asked which enzyme a third taxon most likely uses. Experiment 1 and its follow-up, with college students, used triads involving amphibians, reptiles, and mammals (reptiles and mammals are most closely related evolutionarily) and plants, fungi, and animals (fungi are more closely related to animals than to plants). Experiment 2, with 10th graders, also included (...)
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  12.  3
    Perception and Conception in Understanding Evolutionary Trees.Laura R. Novick & Linda C. Fuselier - 2019 - Cognition 192:104001.
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