Results for 'Laura Staum Casasanto'

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  1. Understanding Acceptability Judgments: Distinguishing the Effects of Grammar and Processing on Acceptability Judgments.Laura Staum Casasanto, Philip Hofmeister & Ivan A. Sag - 2010 - In S. Ohlsson & R. Catrambone (eds.), Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society.
     
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  2. Virtually Accommodating: Speech Rate Accommodation to a Virtual Interlocutor.Laura Staum Casasanto, Kyle Jasmin & Daniel Casasanto - 2010 - In S. Ohlsson & R. Catrambone (eds.), Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society.
     
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  3.  6
    The Reverse Chameleon Effect: Negative Social Consequences of Anatomical Mimicry.Daniel Casasanto, Laura Staum Casasanto, Tom Gijssels & Peter Hagoort - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  4. A Paradigm Shift in Theorizing About Justice? A Critique of Sen: Laura Valentini.Laura Valentini - 2011 - Economics and Philosophy 27 (3):297-315.
    In his recent book The Idea of Justice, Amartya Sen suggests that political philosophy should move beyond the dominant, Rawls-inspired, methodological paradigm – what Sen calls ‘transcendental institutionalism’ – towards a more practically oriented approach to justice: ‘realization-focused comparison’. In this article, I argue that Sen's call for a paradigm shift in thinking about justice is unwarranted. I show that his criticisms of the Rawlsian approach are either based on misunderstandings, or correct but of little consequence, and conclude that the (...)
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  5.  43
    Time in the Mind: Using Space to Think About Time.Daniel Casasanto & Lera Boroditsky - 2008 - Cognition 106 (2):579-593.
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  6.  30
    Embodiment of Abstract Concepts: Good and Bad in Right- and Left-Handers.Daniel Casasanto - 2009 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 138 (3):351-367.
  7.  93
    Handedness Shapes Children’s Abstract Concepts.Daniel Casasanto & Tania Henetz - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (2):359-372.
    Can children’s handedness influence how they represent abstract concepts like kindness and intelligence? Here we show that from an early age, right-handers associate rightward space more strongly with positive ideas and leftward space with negative ideas, but the opposite is true for left-handers. In one experiment, children indicated where on a diagram a preferred toy and a dispreferred toy should go. Right-handers tended to assign the preferred toy to a box on the right and the dispreferred toy to a box (...)
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  8.  64
    Laura F. Hodges, Chaucer and Clothing: Clerical and Academic Costume in the General Prologue to “The Canterbury Tales.” (Chaucer Studies, 34.) Woodbridge, Eng., and Rochester, N.Y.: Boydell and Brewer, 2005. Pp. Xiv, 316 Plus 8 Color Plates; 16 Black-and-White Plates. $90. [REVIEW]Laura L. Howes - 2006 - Speculum 81 (4):1209-1211.
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  9.  80
    The Essential Moral Perfection of God: LAURA L. GARCIA.Laura L. Garcia - 1987 - Religious Studies 23 (1):137-144.
    Many theists of a traditional bent have been bothered by the apparent tension between God's essential omnipotence and his essential moral goodness. Nelson Pike draws attention to the conflict between these two attributes in his article ‘Omnipotence and God's Ability to Sin’, and there have been many attempts to respond to it since that time. Most of these responses argue that the essential omnipotence and essential goodness of God are not logically incompatible, so that the traditional conception of God is (...)
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  10.  9
    Mirror Reading Can Reverse the Flow of Time.Daniel Casasanto & Roberto Bottini - 2014 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 143 (2):473-479.
  11. Interpreting Quantum Theories: The Art of the Possible.Laura Ruetsche - 2011 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Philosophers of quantum mechanics have generally addressed exceedingly simple systems. Laura Ruetsche offers a much-needed study of the interpretation of more complicated systems, and an underexplored family of physical theories, such as quantum field theory and quantum statistical mechanics, showing why they repay philosophical attention. She guides those familiar with the philosophy of ordinary QM into the philosophy of 'QM infinity', by presenting accessible introductions to relevant technical notions and the foundational questions they frame--and then develops and defends answers (...)
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  12.  16
    The Hands of Time: Temporal Gestures in English Speakers.Daniel Casasanto & Kyle Jasmin - 2012 - Cognitive Linguistics 23 (4):643–674.
    Do English speakers think about time the way they talk about it? In spoken English, time appears to flow along the sagittal axis (front/back): the future is ahead and the past is behind us. Here we show that when asked to gesture about past and future events deliberately, English speakers often use the sagittal axis, as language suggests they should. By contrast, when producing co-speech gestures spontaneously, they use the lateral axis (left/right) overwhelmingly more often, gesturing leftward for earlier times (...)
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  13.  26
    Space and Time in the Child’s Mind: Evidence for a Cross-Dimensional Asymmetry.Daniel Casasanto, Olga Fotakopoulou & Lera Boroditsky - 2010 - Cognitive Science 34 (3):387-405.
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  14.  17
    Do Monkeys Think in Metaphors? Representations of Space and Time in Monkeys and Humans.Dustin J. Merritt, Daniel Casasanto & Elizabeth M. Brannon - 2010 - Cognition 117 (2):191-202.
  15.  8
    Motor Action and Emotional Memory.Daniel Casasanto & Katinka Dijkstra - 2010 - Cognition 115 (1):179.
  16. Free Will: A Philosophical Study.Laura W. Ekstrom - 1999 - Westview.
    In this comprehensive new study of human free agency, Laura Waddell Ekstrom critically surveys contemporary philosophical literature and provides a novel account of the conditions for free action. Ekstrom argues that incompatibilism concerning free will and causal determinism is true and thus the right account of the nature of free action must be indeterminist in nature. She examines a variety of libertarian approaches, ultimately defending an account relying on indeterministic causation among events and appealing to agent causation only in (...)
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  17.  27
    Can Culture Influence Body‐Specific Associations Between Space and Valence?Juanma Fuente, Daniel Casasanto, Antonio Román & Julio Santiago - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (4):821-832.
    People implicitly associate positive ideas with their dominant side of space and negative ideas with their non-dominant side. Right-handers tend to associate “good” with “right” and “bad” with “left,” but left-handers associate “bad” with “right” and “good” with “left.” Whereas right-handers' implicit associations align with idioms in language and culture that link “good” with “right,” left-handers' implicit associations go against them. Can cultural conventions modulate the body-specific association between valence and left-right space? Here, we compared people from Spanish and Moroccan (...)
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  18.  14
    Meaning is Not a Reflex: Context Dependence of Spatial Congruity Effects.Daniel Casasanto, Geoffrey Brookshire & Richard Ivry - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (8):1979-1986.
    In two experiments, Brookshire, Ivry, and Casasanto showed that words with positive and negative emotional valence can activate spatial representations with a high degree of automaticity, but also that this activation is highly context dependent. Lebois, Wilson-Mendenhall, and Barsalou reported that they “aimed to replicate” our study but found only null results in the “Brookshire et al. replication” conditions. Here we express concerns about three aspects of this paper. First, the study was not an attempt to replicate ours; it (...)
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  19.  15
    Nature and Nurture in French Ethnography and Anthropology, 1859-1914.Martin S. Staum - 2004 - Journal of the History of Ideas 65 (3):475-495.
  20.  8
    Metaphors We Learn By: Directed Motor Action Improves Word Learning.Daniel Casasanto & Angela de Bruin - 2019 - Cognition 182:177-183.
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  21. How Deep Are Effects of Language on Thought? Time Estimation in Speakers of English and Greek.Daniel Casasanto, Olga Fotokopolou, Ria Pita & Lera Boroditsky - unknown
     
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  22. A Rebuttal of Nussbaum Laura Cannon.Laura Cannon - 2005 - In Barbara S. Andrew, Jean Clare Keller & Lisa H. Schwartzman (eds.), Feminist Interventions in Ethics and Politics: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. pp. 97.
  23. Toward a Plausible Event-Causal Indeterminist Account of Free Will.Laura Ekstrom - 2019 - Synthese 196 (1):127-144.
    For those who maintain that free will is incompatible with causal determinism, a persistent problem is to give a coherent characterization of action that is neither determined by prior events nor random, arbitrary, lucky or in some way insufficiently under the control of the agent to count as free action. One approach—that of Roderick Chisholm and others—is to say that a third alternative is for an action to be caused by an agent in a way that is not reducible to (...)
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  24. Did My Brain Implant Make Me Do It? Questions Raised by DBS Regarding Psychological Continuity, Responsibility for Action and Mental Competence.Laura Klaming & Pim Haselager - 2013 - Neuroethics 6 (3):527-539.
    Deep brain stimulation is a well-accepted treatment for movement disorders and is currently explored as a treatment option for various neurological and psychiatric disorders. Several case studies suggest that DBS may, in some patients, influence mental states critical to personality to such an extent that it affects an individual’s personal identity, i.e. the experience of psychological continuity, of persisting through time as the same person. Without questioning the usefulness of DBS as a treatment option for various serious and treatment refractory (...)
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  25.  11
    Space and Time in the Sighted and Blind.Roberto Bottini, Davide Crepaldi, Daniel Casasanto, Virgine Crollen & Olivier Collignon - 2015 - Cognition 141:67-72.
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  26.  33
    Motor Imagery Shapes Abstract Concepts.Juanma Fuente, Daniel Casasanto, Isidro Martínez‐Cascales Jose & Julio Santiago - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (5):1350-1360.
    The concepts of “good” and “bad” are associated with right and left space. Individuals tend to associate good things with the side of their dominant hand, where they experience greater motor fluency, and bad things with their nondominant side. This mapping has been shown to be flexible: Changing the relative fluency of the hands, or even observing a change in someone else's motor fluency, results in a reversal of the conceptual mapping, such that good things become associated with the side (...)
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  27. Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema.Laura Mulvey - 2010 - In Marc Furstenau (ed.), The Film Theory Reader: Debates and Arguments. Routledge.
     
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  28.  10
    Spatializing Emotion: No Evidence for a Domain‐General Magnitude System.Benjamin Pitt & Daniel Casasanto - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (7):2150-2180.
    People implicitly associate different emotions with different locations in left-right space. Which aspects of emotion do they spatialize, and why? Across many studies people spatialize emotional valence, mapping positive emotions onto their dominant side of space and negative emotions onto their non-dominant side, consistent with theories of metaphorical mental representation. Yet other results suggest a conflicting mapping of emotional intensity, according to which people associate more intense emotions with the right and less intense emotions with the left — regardless of (...)
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  29.  7
    The Correlations in Experience Principle: How Culture Shapes Concepts of Time and Number.Benjamin Pitt & Daniel Casasanto - 2020 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 149 (6):1048-1070.
  30. Bootstrapping Our Way to Samesaying.Laura Schroeter - 2012 - Synthese 189 (1):177-197.
    This paper articulates two constraints on an acceptable account of meaning: (i) accessibility: sameness of meaning affords an immediate appearance of de jure co-reference, (ii) flexibility: sameness of meaning tolerates open-ended variation in speakers' substantive understanding of the reference. Traditional accounts of meaning have trouble simultaneously satisfying both constraints. I suggest that relationally individuated meanings provide a promising way of avoiding this tension. On relational accounts, we bootstrap our way to de jure co-reference: the subjective appearance of de jure co-reference (...)
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  31. Free Will, Chance, and Mystery.Laura W. Ekstrom - 2003 - Philosophical Studies 113 (2):153-80.
    This paper proposes a reconciliation between libertarian freedomand causal indeterminism, without relying on agent-causation asa primitive notion. I closely examine Peter van Inwagen''s recentcase for free will mysterianism, which is based in part on thewidespread worry that undetermined acts are too chancy to befree. I distinguish three senses of the term chance I thenargue that van Inwagen''s case for free will mystrianism fails,since there is no single construal of the term change on whichall of the premises of his argument for (...)
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  32.  49
    Business Ethical Values in China and the U.S.Laura L. Whitcomb, Carolyn B. Erdener & Chen Li - 1998 - Journal of Business Ethics 17 (8):839-852.
    The research presented in this paper focuses on business ethical values inChina, a country in which the process of institutional transformation has left cultural values in a state of flux. A survey was conducted in China and the U.S. by using five business scenarios. Survey results show similarities between the Chinese and American decision choices for three out of five scenarios. However, the results reveal significant differences in rationales, even forsimilar decisions. The implications of similarities and differences between the U.S. (...)
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  33.  40
    Epistemic Emotions and the Value of Truth.Laura Candiotto - 2020 - Acta Analytica 35 (4):563-577.
    In this paper, I discuss the intrinsic value of truth from the perspective of the emotion studies in virtue epistemology. The strategy is the one that looks at epistemic emotions as driving forces towards truth as the most valuable epistemic good. But in doing so, a puzzle arises: how can the value of truth be intrinsic and instrumental? My answer lies in the difference established by Duncan Pritchard between epistemic value and the value of the epistemic applied to the case (...)
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  34. Book Review: Compassionate Confinement: A Year in the Life of Unit C by Laura S. Abrams and Ben Andersen-Nathe. [REVIEW]Laura S. Logan - 2014 - Gender and Society 28 (6):936-938.
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  35. Normative Concepts: A Connectedness Model.Laura Schroeter - 2014 - Philosophers' Imprint 14.
    This paper proposes a new relational account of concepts and shows how it is particularly well suited to characterizing normative concepts. The key advantage of our ‘connectedness’ model is that it explains how subjects can share the same normative concepts despite radical divergences in the descriptive or motivational commitments they associate with them. The connectedness model builds social and historical facts into the foundations of concept identity. This aspect of the model, we suggest, reshapes normative epistemology and provides new resources (...)
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  36. Public Policies on Corporate Social Responsibility: The Role of Governments in Europe.Laura Albareda, Josep M. Lozano & Tamyko Ysa - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 74 (4):391-407.
    Over the last decade, Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has been defined first as a concept whereby companies decide voluntarily to contribute to a better society and cleaner environment and, second, as a process by which companies manage their relationship␣with stakeholders (European Commission, 2001. Nowadays, CSR has become a priority issue on governments’ agendas. This has changed governments’ capacity to act and impact on social and environmental issues in their relationship with companies, but has also affected the framework in which CSR (...)
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  37.  77
    The Epistemic Role of Outlaw Emotions.Laura Silva - forthcoming - Ergo.
    Outlaw emotions are emotions that stand in tension with one’s wider belief system, often allowing epistemic insight one may have otherwise lacked. Outlaw emotions are thought to play crucial epistemic roles under conditions of oppression. Although the crucial epistemic value of these emotions is widely acknowledged, specific accounts of their epistemic role(s) remain largely programmatic. There are two dominant accounts of the epistemic role of emotions: The Motivational View and the Justificatory View. Philosophers of emotion assume that these dominant ways (...)
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  38.  59
    Communicating About Ethics with Small Firms: Experiences From the U.K. And Spain. [REVIEW]Laura J. Spence & José Félix Lozano - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics 27 (1-2):43 - 53.
    This article introduces the important issue of communicating with small firms about ethical issues. Evidence from two research projects from the U.K. and Spain are used to indicate some of the important issues and how small firms may differ from large firms in this area. The importance of informal mechanisms such as the influence of friends, family and employees are highlighted, and the likely ineffectiveness of formal tools such as Codes and Social and Ethical Standards suggested. Further resarch in the (...)
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  39.  23
    The Politics of the Human.Laura Brace, Moya Lloyd, Andrew Reid, Kelly Staples, Véronique Pin-Fat & Anne Phillips - 2018 - Contemporary Political Theory 17 (2):207-240.
  40.  29
    Moral Status: Obligations to Persons and Other Living Things.Laura Purdy & Mary Anne Warren - 1999 - Philosophical Review 108 (4):569.
    Moral Status asks what creates moral obligations toward entities. Warren’s thesis is that attempts to ground moral status on a single criterion have been unsuccessful, as they inevitably lead to Procrustean measures to fit diverse values into a single mold. She proposes instead a “multi-criterial’ approach that promises to accommodate these values. In so doing, she expands and generalizes on a strategy she uses quite successfully in her 1990 article “The Moral Significance of Birth” to show why a personhood approach (...)
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  41. Entrevista a Laura Ponisio. Museo de Arte y Memoria (mAm) La Plata, Argentina. Noviembre 20 de 2009.Maryluz Sarmiento Ordoñez & Laura Ponisio - 2010 - Aletheia: Cuadernos Críticos Del Derecho 1:10 - 4.
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  42.  18
    [Book Review] Children of Choice, Freedom and the New Reproductive Technologies. [REVIEW]Laura M. Purdy - 1996 - Criminal Justice Ethics 15 (1):67-74.
  43.  29
    Patient and Citizen Participation in Health: The Need for Improved Ethical Support.Laura Williamson - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (6):4-16.
    Patient and citizen participation is now regarded as central to the promotion of sustainable health and health care. Involvement efforts create and encounter many diverse ethical challenges that have the potential to enhance or undermine their success. This article examines different expressions of patient and citizen participation and the support health ethics offers. It is contended that despite its prominence and the link between patient empowerment and autonomy, traditional bioethics is insufficient to guide participation efforts. In addition, the turn to (...)
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  44.  17
    Modulation of Motor-Meaning Congruity Effects for Valenced Words.G. Brookshire, Daniel Casasanto & Richard Ivry - 2010 - In S. Ohlsson & R. Catrambone (eds.), Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society. pp. 1940--1945.
  45.  32
    Don’T Blame the Model: Reconsidering the Network Approach to Psychopathology.Laura F. Bringmann & Markus I. Eronen - 2018 - Psychological Review 125 (4):606-615.
    The network approach to psychopathology is becoming increasingly popular. The motivation for this approach is to provide a replacement for the problematic common cause perspective and the associated latent variable model, where symptoms are taken to be mere effects of a common cause (the disorder itself). The idea is that the latent variable model is plausible for medical diseases, but unrealistic for mental disorders, which should rather be conceptualized as networks of directly interacting symptoms. We argue that this rationale for (...)
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  46. Why Be an Anti-Individualist?Laura Schroeter - 2008 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 77 (1):105-141.
    Anti-individualists claim that concepts are individuated with an eye to purely external facts about a subject's environment about which she may be ignorant or mistaken. This paper offers a novel reason for thinking that anti-individualistic concepts are an ineliminable part of commonsense psychology. Our commitment to anti-individualism, I argue, is ultimately grounded in a rational epistemic agent's commitment to refining her own representational practices in the light of new and surprising information about her environment. Since anti-individualism is an implicit part (...)
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  47.  50
    Reproducing Persons: Issues in Feminist Bioethics.Laura Purdy - 1996 - Cornell University Press.
    Controversies about abortion and women's reproductive technologies often seem to reflect personal experience, religious commitment, or emotional response. Laura M. Purdy believes, however, that coherent ethical principles are implicit in these controversies and that feminist bioethics can help clarify the conflicts of interest which often figure in human reproduction. As she defines the underlying issues, Purdy emphasizes the importance of taking women's interests fully into account. Reproducing Persons first explores the rights and duties connected with conception and pregnancy. Purdy (...)
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  48.  24
    The Theory and Practice of Autonomy.Laura Waddell Ekstrom - 1993 - Philosophical Review 102 (4):616.
  49. Libertarianism and Frankfurt-Style Cases.Laura W. Ekstrom - 2002 - In Robert Kane (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Free Will, 1st edition. Oxford University Press.
  50.  64
    Anger and its Desires.Laura Silva - forthcoming - European Journal of Philosophy.
    The orthodox view of anger takes desires for revenge or retribution to be central to the emotion. In this paper, I develop an empirically informed challenge to the retributive view of anger. In so doing, I argue that a distinct desire is central to anger: a desire for recognition. Desires for recognition aim at the targets of anger acknowledging the wrong they have committed, as opposed to aiming for their suffering. In light of the centrality of this desire for recognition, (...)
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