4 found
Order:
  1.  16
    It’s Not Just Counting that Counts: a Reply to Gilbert, Viaña, and Ineichen.Robyn Bluhm & Laura Y. Cabrera - 2018 - Neuroethics 14 (1):23-26.
    Gilbert et al. argue that discussions of self-related changes in patients undergoing DBS are overblown. They show that there is little evidence that these changes occur frequently and make recommendations for further research. We point out that their framing of the issue, their methodology, and their recommendations do not attend to other important questions about these changes.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  2.  11
    Environmental Neuroethics: Bridging Environmental Ethics and Mental Health.Adam J. Shriver, Laura Y. Cabrera & Judy Illes - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (9):26-27.
  3.  4
    Self-Implant Ambiguity? Understanding Self-Related Changes in Deep Brain Stimulation.Robyn Bluhm & Laura Y. Cabrera - 2022 - Philosophical Explorations 25 (3):367-385.
    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) uses electrodes implanted in the brain to modulate dysregulated brain activity related to a variety of neurological and psychiatric conditions. A number of people who use DBS have reported changes that affect their sense of self. In the neuroethics literature, there has been significant debate over the exact nature of these changes. More recently, there have been suggestions that this debate is overblown and detracts from clinically-relevant ways of understanding these effects of DBS. In this paper, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  2
    Self-Implant Ambiguity? Understanding Self-Related Changes in Deep Brain Stimulation.Robyn Bluhm & Laura Y. Cabrera - 2022 - Tandf: Philosophical Explorations:1-19.
    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) uses electrodes implanted in the brain to modulate dysregulated brain activity related to a variety of neurological and psychiatric conditions. A number of people who use DBS have reported changes that affect their sense of self. In the neuroethics literature, there has been significant debate over the exact nature of these changes. More recently, there have been suggestions that this debate is overblown and detracts from clinically-relevant ways of understanding these effects of DBS. In this paper, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark