6 found
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  1.  12
    Brain Data in Context: Are New Rights the Way to Mental and Brain Privacy?Daniel Susser & Laura Y. Cabrera - 2024 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 15 (2):122-133.
    The potential to collect brain data more directly, with higher resolution, and in greater amounts has heightened worries about mental and brain privacy. In order to manage the risks to individuals posed by these privacy challenges, some have suggested codifying new privacy rights, including a right to “mental privacy.” In this paper, we consider these arguments and conclude that while neurotechnologies do raise significant privacy concerns, such concerns are—at least for now—no different from those raised by other well-understood data collection (...)
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  2.  12
    “They Are Invasive in Different Ways.”: Stakeholders’ Perceptions of the Invasiveness of Psychiatric Electroceutical Interventions.Robyn Bluhm, Marissa Cortright, Eric D. Achtyes & Laura Y. Cabrera - 2023 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 14 (1):1-12.
    Medical interventions are usually categorized as “invasive” when they involve piercing the skin or inserting an object into the body. Beyond this standard definition, however, there is little discussion of the concept of invasiveness in the medical literature, despite evidence that the term is used in ways that do not reflect the standard definition of medical invasiveness. We interviewed psychiatrists, patients with depression, and members of the public without depression to better understand their views on the invasiveness of several psychiatric (...)
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  3.  20
    It’s Not Just Counting that Counts: a Reply to Gilbert, Viaña, and Ineichen.Robyn Bluhm & Laura Y. Cabrera - 2018 - Neuroethics 14 (1):23-26.
    Gilbert et al. argue that discussions of self-related changes in patients undergoing DBS are overblown. They show that there is little evidence that these changes occur frequently and make recommendations for further research. We point out that their framing of the issue, their methodology, and their recommendations do not attend to other important questions about these changes.
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  4.  18
    Self-implant ambiguity? Understanding self-related changes in deep brain stimulation.Robyn Bluhm & Laura Y. Cabrera - 2022 - Philosophical Explorations 25 (3):367-385.
    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) uses electrodes implanted in the brain to modulate dysregulated brain activity related to a variety of neurological and psychiatric conditions. A number of people who use DBS have reported changes that affect their sense of self. In the neuroethics literature, there has been significant debate over the exact nature of these changes. More recently, there have been suggestions that this debate is overblown and detracts from clinically-relevant ways of understanding these effects of DBS. In this paper, (...)
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  5.  10
    Self-implant ambiguity? Understanding self-related changes in deep brain stimulation.Robyn Bluhm & Laura Y. Cabrera - 2022 - Tandf: Philosophical Explorations:1-19.
    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) uses electrodes implanted in the brain to modulate dysregulated brain activity related to a variety of neurological and psychiatric conditions. A number of people who use DBS have reported changes that affect their sense of self. In the neuroethics literature, there has been significant debate over the exact nature of these changes. More recently, there have been suggestions that this debate is overblown and detracts from clinically-relevant ways of understanding these effects of DBS. In this paper, (...)
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  6.  16
    Environmental Neuroethics: Bridging Environmental Ethics and Mental Health.Adam J. Shriver, Laura Y. Cabrera & Judy Illes - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (9):26-27.