Results for 'Laurence Alison'

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  1. Deborah Bird Rose, Thom van Dooren, and Matthew Chrulew, eds.: Extinction Studies: Stories of Time, Death, and Generations.Alison Laurence - forthcoming - Journal of the History of Biology:1-3.
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  2.  14
    Colliding Sacred Values: A Psychological Theory of Least-Worst Option Selection.Neil Shortland & Laurence Alison - forthcoming - Thinking and Reasoning:1-22.
    This paper focuses on how Soldiers make hard choices between competing options. To understand the psychological processes behind these types of decisions, we present qualitative data collected from Soldiers with combat experience. Using a grounded theory approach, we develop a testable and falsifiable theory of least-worst decision-making. Specifically, we argue that the process of choosing a least-worst option centres on an individuals’ ability to select between colliding values. Redundant deliberation describes the process that occurs when two equally “sacred” values collide (...)
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  3.  24
    The Effects of Subjective Time Pressure and Individual Differences on Hypotheses Generation and Action Prioritization in Police Investigations.Laurence Alison, Bernadette Doran, Matthew L. Long, Nicola Power & Amy Humphrey - 2013 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 19 (1):83.
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  4.  26
    Tom Simpson, Peter Carruthers, Stephen Laurence, & Stephen Stich.Stephen Laurence - 2005 - In Peter Carruthers (ed.), The Innate Mind: Structure and Contents. New York: Oxford University Press New York. pp. 1--3.
  5. The Joy of Being Wrong: Original Sin Through Easter Eyes.James Alison, Alistair I. Mcfadyen, Andrew Sung Park, Ted Peters & Solomon Schimmel - 2001 - Journal of Religious Ethics 29 (3):471-501.
    Reviewing works by James Alison, Alistair McFadyen, Andrew Sung Park, Ted Peters, and Solomon Schimmel, the author suggests that the status and function of the discourse/doctrine of sin highlight tensions between theology and ethics in ways that suggest the character, limits, and promise of religious ethics. This literature commends attention to sin-talk because it helps religious ethicists to render more adequately the dynamics of human agency, sociality, and culture and because it raises questions about the nature and task of (...)
     
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  6.  7
    Review of Roman Pompeii: Space and Society, by Laurence, R. [REVIEW]Alison Cooley - 1996 - The Classical Review 46 (1):140-141.
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  7. Concepts: Core Readings.Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (eds.) - 1999 - MIT Press.
    The first part of the book centers around the fall of the Classical Theory of Concepts in the face of attacks by W. V. O. Quine, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Eleanor..
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  8. The Ontology of Concepts: Abstract Objects or Mental Representations?Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence - 2007 - Noûs 41 (4):561-593.
    What is a concept? Philosophers have given many different answers to this question, reflecting a wide variety of approaches to the study of mind and language. Nonetheless, at the most general level, there are two dominant frameworks in contemporary philosophy. One proposes that concepts are mental representations, while the other proposes that they are abstract objects. This paper looks at the differences between these two approaches, the prospects for combining them, and the issues that are involved in the dispute. We (...)
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  9. Radical Concept Nativism.Stephen Laurence & Eric Margolis - 2002 - Cognition 86 (1):25-55.
    Radical concept nativism is the thesis that virtually all lexical concepts are innate. Notoriously endorsed by Jerry Fodor (1975, 1981), radical concept nativism has had few supporters. However, it has proven difficult to say exactly what’s wrong with Fodor’s argument. We show that previous responses are inadequate on a number of grounds. Chief among these is that they typically do not achieve sufficient distance from Fodor’s dialectic, and, as a result, they do not illuminate the central question of how new (...)
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  10. The Poverty of the Stimulus Argument.Stephen Laurence & Eric Margolis - 2001 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 52 (2):217-276.
    Noam Chomsky's Poverty of the Stimulus Argument is one of the most famous and controversial arguments in the study of language and the mind. Though widely endorsed by linguists, the argument has met with much resistance in philosophy. Unfortunately, philosophical critics have often failed to fully appreciate the power of the argument. In this paper, we provide a systematic presentation of the Poverty of the Stimulus Argument, clarifying its structure, content, and evidential base. We defend the argument against a variety (...)
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  11. Concepts and Conceptual Analysis.Stephen Laurence & Eric Margolis - 2003 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 67 (2):253-282.
    Conceptual analysis is undergoing a revival in philosophy, and much of the credit goes to Frank Jackson. Jackson argues that conceptual analysis is needed as an integral component of so-called serious metaphysics and that it also does explanatory work in accounting for such phenomena as categorization, meaning change, communication, and linguistic understanding. He even goes so far as to argue that opponents of concep- tual analysis are implicitly committed to it in practice. We show that he is wrong on all (...)
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  12. Concepts.Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence - 2011 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    This entry provides an overview of theories of concepts that is organized around five philosophical issues: (1) the ontology of concepts, (2) the structure of concepts, (3) empiricism and nativism about concepts, (4) concepts and natural language, and (5) concepts and conceptual analysis.
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  13. Concepts.Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence - 2003 - In Stephen P. Stich & Ted A. Warfield (eds.), Blackwell Guide to Philosophy of Mind. Blackwell. pp. 190-213.
    This article provides a critical overview of competing theories of conceptual structure (definitional structure, probabilistic structure, theory structure), including the view that concepts have no structure (atomism). We argue that the explanatory demands that these different theories answer to are best accommodated by an organization in which concepts are taken to have atomic cores that are linked to differing types of conceptual structure.
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  14. Should We Trust Our Intuitions? Deflationary Accounts of the Analytic Data.Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence - 2003 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 103 (3):299-323.
    At least since W. V. O. Quine's famous critique of the analytic/synthetic distinction, philosophers have been deeply divided over whether there are any analytic truths. One line of thought suggests that the simple fact that people have ' intuitions of analyticity' might provide an independent argument for analyticities. If defenders of analyticity can explain these intuitions and opponents cannot, then perhaps there are analyticities after all. We argue that opponents of analyticity have some unexpected resources for explaining these intuitions and (...)
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  15.  83
    Number and Natural Language.Stephen Laurence & Eric Margolis - 2005 - In Peter Carruthers, Stephen Laurence & Stephen P. Stich (eds.), The Innate Mind: Structure and Contents. New York: Oxford University Press New York. pp. 1--216.
    One of the most important abilities we have as humans is the ability to think about number. In this chapter, we examine the question of whether there is an essential connection between language and number. We provide a careful examination of two prominent theories according to which concepts of the positive integers are dependent on language. The first of these claims that language creates the positive integers on the basis of an innate capacity to represent real numbers. The second claims (...)
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  16. Is Linguistics a Branch of Psychology?Stephen Laurence - 2003 - In Alex Barber (ed.), The Epistemology of Language. Oxford University Press.
  17. A Chomskian Alternative to Convention-Based Semantics.Stephen Laurence - 1996 - Mind 105 (418):269-301.
    In virtue of what do the utterances we make mean what they do? What facts about these signs, about us, and about our environment make it the case that they have the meanings they do? According to a tradition stemming from H.P. Grice through David Lewis and Stephen Schiffer it is in virtue of facts about conventions that we participate in as language users that our utterances mean what they do (see Gr'ice 1957, Lewis 1969, 1983, Schiffer 1972, 1982). This (...)
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  18. Intentionality and Naturalism.Stephen P. Stich & Stephen Laurence - 1994 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 19 (1):159-82.
    ...the deepest motivation for intentional irrealism derives not from such relatively technical worries about individualism and holism as we.
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  19. Regress Arguments Against the Language of Thought.Stephen Laurence & Eric Margolis - 1997 - Analysis 57 (1):60-66.
    The Language of Thought Hypothesis is often taken to have the fatal flaw that it generates an explanatory regress. The language of thought is invoked to explain certain features of natural language (e.g., that it is learned, understood, and is meaningful), but, according to the regress argument, the language of thought itself has these same features and hence no explanatory progress has been made. We argue that such arguments rely on the tacit assumption that the entire motivation for the language (...)
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  20.  99
    Multiple Meanings and Stability of Content.Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence - 1998 - Journal of Philosophy 95 (5):255-63.
    We examine a proposal of Eric Lormand's for dealing with perhaps the chief difficulty facing holistic theories of meaning—meaning instability. The problem is that, given a robust holism, small changes in a representational system are likely to lead to meaning changes throughout the system. Consequently, different individuals are likely never to mean the same thing. Lormand suggests that holists can avoid this problem—and even secure more stability than non-holists—by positing that symbols have multiple meanings. We argue that the proposal doesn't (...)
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  21. Lewis' Strawman.Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence - 2002 - Philosophical Quarterly 52 (206):55-65.
    In a survey of his views in the philosophy of mind, David Lewis criticizes much recent work in the field by attacking an imaginary opponent, Strawman. His case against Strawman focuses on four central theses which Lewis takes to be widely accepted among contemporary philosophers of mind. These theses concerns (1) the language of thought hypothesis and its relation to folk psychology, (2) narrow content, (3) de se content, and (4) rationality. We respond to Lewis, arguing (among other things) that (...)
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  22. Where the Regress Argument Still Goes Wrong: Reply to Knowles.Stephen Laurence & Eric Margolis - 1999 - Analysis 59 (4):321-327.
    The Language of Thought Hypothesis (LOT) is at the centre of a number of the most fundamental debates about the mind. Yet many philosophers want to reject LOT out of hand on the grounds that it is essentially a recid- ivistic doctrine, one that has long since been refuted. According to these philosophers, LOT is subject to a devastating regress argument. There are several versions of the argument, but the basic idea is as follows. (1) Natu- ral language has some (...)
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  23.  43
    Introduction: Nativism Past and Present.Tom Simpson, Peter Carruthers, Stephen Laurence & Amp Amp - 2005 - In Peter Carruthers, Stephen Laurence & Stephen Stich (eds.), The Innate Mind: Structure and Contents. New York: Oxford University Press New York.
    Elaborates some of the background assumptions made by the chapters that follow and situates the theory that the author espouses within a wider context and range of alternatives. More specifically, it distinguishes between creature consciousness and state consciousness, and between access consciousness and phenomenal consciousness. And it defends representationalist accounts of consciousness against brute physicalist accounts. The chapter also introduces the remaining 11 chapters.
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  24. The Innate Mind, Vol. III, Foundations and the Future.P. Carruthers, S. Stich & S. Laurence (eds.) - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
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  25.  16
    Philosophy From the Ground Up: An Interview with Alison Wylie.Alison Wylie - 2000 - Assemblages 5.
    Alison Wylie is one of the few full-time academic philosophers of the social and historical sciences on the planet today. And fortunately for us, she happens to specialise in archaeology! After emerging onto the archaeological theory scene in the mid-1980s with her work on analogy, she has continued to work on philosophical questions raised by archaeological practice. In particular, she explores the status of evidence and ideals of objectivity in contemporary archaeology: how do we think we know about the (...)
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  26. Archaeology and Critical Feminism of Science: Interview with Alison Wylie.Alison Wylie, Kelly Koide, Marisol Marini & Marian Toledo - 2014 - Scientiae Studia 12 (3):549-590.
    In this wide-ranging interview with three members of the Department of Philosophy at the University of Sao Paolo (Brazil) Wylie explains how she came to work on philosophical issues raised in and by archaeology, describes the contextualist challenges to ‘received view’ models of confirmation and explanation in archaeology that inform her work on the status of evidence and contextual ideals of objectivity, and discusses the role of non-cognitive values in science. She also is pressed to explain what’s feminist about feminist (...)
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  27. "In Defense of Pure Reason: A Rationalist Account of A Priori Justification" by Laurence BonJour. [REVIEW]Tim Crane - 2003 - Mind 112 (447):502-6.
    Laurence BonJour divides approaches to a priori justification into three kinds. Quine’s radical empiricism denies the existence of any special category of a priori justification; moderate empiricism attempts to explain a priori justification in terms of something like knowledge of meaning or grasp of concepts; and rationalism postulates an irreducible ‘rational insight’ into the nature of reality. The positions therefore form a familiar trio of eliminativism, reductionism and anti-reductionism concerning a priori justification. BonJour’s interesting and (in the present philosophical (...)
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  28. « Review Of: Mary P. Nichols, Socrates On Friendship And Community: Reflections On Plato’s Symposium, Phaedrus, And Lysis ; And Laurence D. Cooper, Eros In Plato, Rousseau, And Nietzsche: The Politics Of Infinity ». [REVIEW]David Konstan - 2010 - Plato: The Internet Journal of the International Plato Society 10.
    Mary P. Nichols, Socrates on Friendship and Community: Reflections on Plato’s Symposium, Phaedrus, and Lysis. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008. Pp. viii + 229. ISBN 978-0-521-89973-4. Laurence D. Cooper, Eros in Plato, Rousseau, and Nietzsche: The Politics of Infinity. University Park: The Pennsylvania State University Press, 2008. Pp. xii + 357. ISBN 978-0-271-03330-3.
     
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  29.  7
    Thomism in the Renaissance: Fifty Years After Kristeller. Divus Thomas 120 Ed. By Alison Frazier.John Monfasani - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (4):753-754.
    In his long scholarly career, Paul Oskar Kristeller produced an extraordinary number of seminal books and articles, one of which was the 1967 monograph Le Thomisme et la pensée italienne de la Renaissance, which presented the evidence for the intellectual vitality of Thomism in the Italian Renaissance. In 2017, on the fiftieth anniversary of Kristeller's book, the collection of articles under review was presented originally as papers at the Chicago meeting of the Renaissance Society of America and brought together for (...)
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  30.  89
    From a "Revealed" Psychology to Theological Inquiry: James Alison's Theological Appropriation of Girard.John P. Edwards - 2014 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 21:121-130.
    In the course of my efforts to distinguish and relate the methods and achievements of René Girard and James Alison, I have developed the hypothesis that a particular pair of theological terms might provide a helpful conceptual tool for carrying out this task—fides quae creditur and fides qua creditur. These terms were given their classic formulation within Protestant scholasticism at the beginning of the seventeenth century, where they were used to distinguish between two dimensions of Christian faith: the “object” (...)
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  31. Review of Alison L. LaCroix Ideological Origins of American Federalism. [REVIEW]H. G. Callaway - 2011 - Law and Politics Book Review 21 (10):619-627.
    Alison L. LaCroix is Assistant Professor of Law at the University of Chicago Law School, where she specializes in legal history, federalism, constitutional law and questions of jurisdiction. She has written a fine, scholarly volume on the intellectual origins of American federalism. LaCroix holds the JD degree (Yale, 1999) and a Ph.D. in history (Harvard, 2007). According to the author, to fully understand the origins of American federalism, we must look beyond the Constitutional Convention of 1787 and range over (...)
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  32.  32
    Punk Rock and Discourse Ethics: 924 Gilman Meets Alison Jaggar.Trevor Smith - 2012 - Radical Philosophy Review 15 (2):281-304.
    Alison Jaggar, in her treatment of feminist discourse ethics, expresses worries about using “idealized and imaginary communities” as elucidatory tools for discursive ethics. In response, this paper presents the history of 924 Gilman as a case study of a non-imagined and real discursive community. While the example of 924 Gilman, with its overtly feminist agenda and democratic ethos, bolsters Jaggar’s claims about the need for “closed communities” within discourse ethics, it also challenges some of her basic assumptions and raises (...)
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  33.  19
    Common Principles, Different Histories: Understanding Religious Liberty in the United States and France: R. Laurence Moore.R. Laurence Moore - 2010 - Modern Intellectual History 7 (2):459-478.
    In her book Liberty of Conscience: In Defense of America's Tradition of Religious Equality the American philosopher Martha Nussbaum joins a chorus of American intellectuals who have criticized France and other European nations for their failure to embrace the concept of cultural pluralism. In Nussbaum's opinion, the meaning that the French attach to egalité has remained stuck in circumstances peculiar to the eighteenth century. The concept is outdated and has not in the contemporary world been able to protect cultural diversity (...)
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  34.  28
    Marshall M. Weinberg Conference: The Future of Cognitive Science - Thursday Afternoon (Oct. 16, 2008) Session: John R. Anderson and Alison Gopnik. [REVIEW]John R. Anderson & Alison Gopnik - unknown
    Six leading experts speak about the future of cognitive science.
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  35.  7
    The Sensation of the Look: The Gazes in Laurence Anyways.Corey Kai Nelson Schultz - 2018 - Film-Philosophy 22 (1):1-20.
    This article analyses the gazes, looks, stares and glares in Laurence Anyways, and examines their affective, interpretive, and symbolic qualities, and their potential to create viewer empathy through affect. The cinematic gaze can produce sensations of shame and fear, by offering a sequence of varied “encounters” to which viewers can react, before we have been given a character onto which we can deflect them, thus bypassing the representational, narrative and even the sympathetic power of the medium to create “raw”, (...)
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  36. In Conversation: Ruth Macklin, Alison Reiheld, Robyn Bluhm, Sidney Callahan, and Frances Kissling Discuss the Marlise Munoz Case, Advance Directives, and Pregnant Women.Ruth Macklin, Alison Reiheld, Robyn Bluhm, Sidney Callahan & Frances Kissling - forthcoming - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 8 (1).
    Feminist bioethicists of a variety of persuasions discuss the 2013 case of Marlise Munoz, a pregnant woman whose medical care was in dispute after she became brain dead.
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  37.  4
    Rationality and Affectivity: The Metaphysics of the Moral Self*: Laurence Thomas.Laurence Thomas - 1988 - Social Philosophy and Policy 5 (2):154-172.
    There is a way of doing moral philosophy which goes something like this: If it can be shown that it is rational for perfectly selfish people to accept the constraints of morality, then it will follow, a fortiori, that it is rational for people capable of affective bonds, and thus less selfish, to do so. On this way of proceeding the real argument – that is, the argument for the actual constraints to be adopted – proceeds with only fully rational (...)
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  38.  3
    The Anthropologist, the Doctors and the Transgender Experience: An Interview with Laurence Hérault.Sylvie Steinberg & Laurence Hérault - 2014 - Clio 37.
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  39.  13
    Freedom, Benefit and Understanding: Reflections on Laurence Claus's Critique of Authority.John Finnis - unknown
    Written for a symposium in the University of San Diego Law School in September 2013 on Laurence Claus, Law’s Evolution and Human Understanding, this article appears in the final issue of volume 52 of the San Diego Law Review. With new illustrations and considerations suggested by the book, the article argues for a number of theses: “Because I/we say so” is never a reasonable ground or formulation of authoritative acts such as enactments or parental or other orders. The moral (...)
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  40.  11
    Gerard, Kames, Alison, and Stewart.Rachel Zuckert - 2012 - In Timothy M. Costelloe (ed.), The Sublime: From Antiquity to the Present. Cambridge University Press. pp. 64.
    This essay concerns the theories of the sublime proposed by Alexander Gerard, Henry Home (Lord Kames), Archibald Alison, and Dugald Stewart. All four thinkers, I argue, aim to provide a philosophical account of the unity of the concept of the sublime, i.e., to respond to the question: what might all objects, art works, etc. that have been identified as sublime (or “grand”) in the philosophical, literary, art-theoretical, and rhetorical tradition have in common? Yet because they find the objects called (...)
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  41. The Companionship of Books: Essays in Honor of Laurence Berns.John E. Alvis, George Anastaplo, Paul A. Cantor, Jerrold R. Caplan, Michael Davis, Robert Goldberg, Kenneth Hart Green, Harry V. Jaffa, Antonio Marino-López, Joshua Parens, Sharon Portnoff, Robert D. Sacks, Owen J. Sadlier & Martin D. Yaffe - 2011 - Lexington Books.
    This volume is a collection of essays by various contributors in honor of the late Laurence Berns, Richard Hammond Elliot Tutor Emeritus at St. John's College, Annapolis. The essays address the literary, political, theological, and philosophical themes of his life's work as a scholar, teacher, and constant companion of the "great books.".
     
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  42. Two Views of Laurence Lampert's Leo Strauss and Nietzsche. [REVIEW]Lawrence Casse & Charles Butterworth - 1998 - Interpretation 25 (3):429-445.
    Two reviews of Laurence Lapert's Leo Strauss and Nietzsche.
     
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  43. Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science / Edited by Daryn Lehoux, A. D. Morrison, and Alison Sharrock.Daryn Lehoux, A. D. Morrison & Alison Sharrock (eds.) - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
     
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  44. The Companionship of Books: Essays in Honor of Laurence Berns.Alan Udoff, Martin David Yaffe & Sharon Jo Portnoff (eds.) - 2011 - Lexington Books.
    This volume is a collection of essays by various contributors in honor of the late Laurence Berns, Richard Hammond Elliot Tutor Emeritus at St. John's College, Annapolis. The essays address the literary, political, theological, and philosophical themes of his life's work as a scholar, teacher, and constant companion of the "great books.".
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  45.  74
    Book Review:Feminist Politics and and Human Nature. Alison M. Jaggar. [REVIEW]Susan Moller Okin - 1985 - Ethics 95 (2):354-.
  46.  28
    Archaeology for Historians - R. Laurence Roman Archaeology for Historians. Pp. XIV + 192, Figs, Ills, Maps. London and New York: Routledge, 2012. Paper, £21.99, Us$35.95 . Isbn: 978-0-415-50592-5. [REVIEW]Eberhard Sauer - 2013 - The Classical Review 63 (2):570-572.
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  47.  24
    EPISTOLOGRAPHY - F. Guillaumont, P. Laurence La Présence de l'histoire dans l'épistolaire. Pp. 496. Tours: Presses Universitaires François-Rabelais, 2012. Paper, €20. ISBN: 978-2-86906-273-3. [REVIEW]Cristiana Sogno - 2013 - The Classical Review 63 (2):451-453.
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  48.  22
    BRUNT ON STOICISM - Brunt Studies in Stoicism. Edited by Miriam Griffin and Alison Samuels. With the Assistance of Michael Crawford. Pp. Vi + 521. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013. Cased, £110, US$199. ISBN: 978-0-19-969585-0. [REVIEW]Brad Inwood - 2014 - The Classical Review 64 (1):111-113.
  49.  20
    Roman Movement - R. Laurence, D.J. Newsome Rome, Ostia, Pompeii. Movement and Space. Pp. XX + 444, Figs, Ills, Maps. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011. Cased, £75, Us$150. Isbn: 978-0-19-958312-6. [REVIEW]Miko Flohr - 2013 - The Classical Review 63 (1):187-189.
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  50.  17
    Roads to Paradise - †Alison Goddard Elliott: Roads to Paradise. Reading the Lives of the Early Saints. Pp. Xvi + 244; 7 Illustrations. Hanover and London: University Press of New England, 1987. £16.75. [REVIEW]Michael Whitby - 1989 - The Classical Review 39 (1):43-45.
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