94 found
Order:
See also
Laurence Goldstein
PhD: University of St. Andrews; Last affiliation: University of Kent
  1.  20
    Universals and Scientific Realism.Laurence Goldstein - 1979 - Philosophical Quarterly 29 (117):360-362.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   66 citations  
  2.  84
    Fibonacci, Yablo, and the Cassationist Approach to Paradox.Laurence Goldstein - 2006 - Mind 115 (460):867-890.
    A syntactically correct number-specification may fail to specify any number due to underspecification. For similar reasons, although each sentence in the Yablo sequence is syntactically perfect, none yields a statement with any truth-value. As is true of all members of the Liar family, the sentences in the Yablo sequence are so constructed that the specification of their truth-conditions is vacuous; the Yablo sentences fail to yield statements. The ‘revenge’ problem is easily defused. The solution to the semantical paradoxes offered here (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  3. A Consistent Way with Paradox.Laurence Goldstein - 2009 - Philosophical Studies 144 (3):377 - 389.
    Consideration of a paradox originally discovered by John Buridan provides a springboard for a general solution to paradoxes within the Liar family. The solution rests on a philosophical defence of truth-value-gaps and is consistent (non-dialetheist), avoids ‘revenge’ problems, imports no ad hoc assumptions, is not applicable to only a proper subset of the semantic paradoxes and implies no restriction of the expressive capacities of language.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  4.  81
    A Yabloesque Paradox in Set Theory.Laurence Goldstein - 1994 - Analysis 54 (4):223-227.
  5.  44
    III A Unified Solution to Some Paradoxes.Laurence Goldstein - 2000 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 100:53-74.
    The Russell class does not exist because the conditions purporting to specify that class are contradictory, and hence fail to specify any class. Equally, the conditions purporting to specify the Liar statement are contradictory and hence, although the Liar sentence is grammatically in order, it fails to yield a statement. Thus the common source of these and related paradoxes is contradictory (or tautologous) specifying conditions-for such conditions fail to specify. This is the diagnosis. The cure consists of seeking and destroying (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  6.  70
    The Paradox of the Liar: A Case of Mistaken Identity.Laurence Goldstein - 1985 - Analysis 45 (1):9.
  7.  50
    `This Statement is Not True' is Not True.Laurence Goldstein - 1992 - Analysis 52 (1):1-5.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  8.  31
    Clear and Queer Thinking: Wittgenstein's Development and His Relevance to Modern Thought.Laurence Goldstein - 1999 - London, England: Duckworth.
    Laurence Goldstein gives a straightforward and lively account of some of the central themes of Wittgenstein's writings on meaning, mind, and mathematics.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  9.  65
    Epimenides and Curry.Laurence Goldstein - 1986 - Analysis 46 (3):117 - 121.
  10.  44
    Quotation of Types and Other Types of Quotation.Laurence Goldstein - 1984 - Analysis 44 (1):1 - 6.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  11.  12
    'This Statement Is Not True' Is Not True.Laurence Goldstein - 1992 - Analysis 52 (1):1.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  12.  83
    Truth-Bearers and the Liar – a Reply to Alan Weir.Laurence Goldstein - 2001 - Analysis 61 (2):115–126.
  13.  5
    III-A Unified Solution to Some Paradoxes.Laurence Goldstein - 2000 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 100 (1):53-74.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  14. The Barber, Russell's Paradox, Catch-22, God, Contradiction, and More.Laurence Goldstein - 2004 - In Graham Priest, J. C. Beall & Bradley Armour-Garb (eds.), The Law of Non-Contradiction. Clarendon Press. pp. 295--313.
    outrageous remarks about contradictions. Perhaps the most striking remark he makes is that they are not false. This claim first appears in his early notebooks (Wittgenstein 1960, p.108). In the Tractatus, Wittgenstein argued that contradictions (like tautologies) are not statements (Sätze) and hence are not false (or true). This is a consequence of his theory that genuine statements are pictures.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  15.  60
    Wittgenstein's Late Views on Belief, Paradox and Contradiction.Laurence Goldstein - 1988 - Philosophical Investigations 11 (1):49-73.
  16. Clear and Queer Thinking: Wittgenstein's Development and His Relevance to Modern Thought.Laurence Goldstein - 2001 - Mind 110 (437):207-211.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  17.  3
    Brevity.Laurence Goldstein (ed.) - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    Brevity in conversation is a window to the workings of the mind. It is both a multifaceted topic of deep philosophical importance and a phenomenon that serves as a testing ground for theories in linguistics, psycholinguistics and computer modeling. Speakers use elliptical constructions and exploit salient features of the conversational environment, a process of pragmatic enrichment, so as to pack a great deal into a few words. They also tailor their words to theirparticular conversational partners. In Brevity, distinguished linguists, philosophers (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  18. Wittgenstein's Ph.D Viva—a Re-Creation.Laurence Goldstein - 1999 - Philosophy 74 (4):499-513.
  19.  92
    False stipulation and semantical paradox.Laurence Goldstein - 1986 - Analysis 46 (4):192.
    Direct download (6 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  20.  67
    The Development of Wittgenstein's Views on Contradiction.Laurence Goldstein - 1986 - History and Philosophy of Logic 7 (1):43-56.
    The views on contradiction and consistency that Wittgenstein expressed in his later writings have met with misunderstanding and almost uniform hositility. In this paper, I trace the roots of these views by attempting to show that, in his early writings, Wittgenstein accorded a ?unique status? to tautologies and contradictions, marking them off logically from genuine propositions. This is integral both to his Tractatus project of furnishing a theory of inference, and to the enterprise of explaining the nature of the Satz (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  21.  32
    Categories of Linguistic Aspects and Grelling's Paradox.Laurence Goldstein - 1980 - Linguistics and Philosophy 4 (3):405 - 421.
  22.  33
    The Fallacy of the Simple Question.Laurence Goldstein - 1993 - Analysis 53 (3):178 - 181.
  23. How Original a Work is the Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus?Laurence Goldstein - 2002 - Philosophy 77 (3):421-446.
    Wittgenstein's Tractatus is widely regarded as a masterpiece, a brilliant, if flawed attempt to achieve an ‘unassailable and definitive … final solution’ to a wide range of philosophical problems. Yet, in a 1931 notebook, Wittgenstein confesses: ‘I think there is some truth in my idea that I am really only reproductive in my thinking. I think I have never invented a line of thinking but that it was always provided for me by someone else’. This disarming self-assessment is, I believe (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  24.  15
    Inescapable Surprises and Acquirable Intentions.Laurence Goldstein - 1993 - Analysis 53 (2):93 - 99.
  25.  44
    A Unified Pyrrhonian Resolution of the Toxin Problem, The Surprise Examination and Newcomb’s Puzzle.Laurence Goldstein & Peter Cave - 2008 - American Philosophical Quarterly 45 (4):365 - 376.
    The three puzzles here considered are shown to have a common structure. And in each, an agent is thrust into a cleverly contrived deliberatively unstable situation. The paper advocates a resolutely Pyrrhonian abandonment of the futile reasoning in which the agent is trapped and advocates an alternative strategy for escape.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  26. Humor and Harm.Laurence Goldstein - 1995 - Sorites 3:27-42.
    For familiar reasons, stereotyping is believed to be irresponsible and offensive. Yet the use of stereotypes in humor is widespread. Particularly offensive are thought to be sexual and racial stereotypes, yet it is just these that figure particularly prominently in jokes. In certain circumstances it is unquestionably wrong to make jokes that employ such stereotypes. Some writers have made the much stronger claim that in all circumstances it is wrong to find such jokes funny; in other words that people who (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  27.  14
    Linguistic Representation.Laurence Goldstein - 1976 - Philosophical Quarterly 26 (103):189-191.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  28.  16
    Wittgenstein's Lectures on the Foundations of Mathematics.Laurence Goldstein - 1977 - Philosophical Quarterly 27 (109):370.
  29.  93
    Pierre and Circumspection in Belief-Formation.Laurence Goldstein - 2009 - Analysis 69 (4):653-655.
    In a well-known story constructed by Saul Kripke , Pierre, a rational but monolingual Frenchman who has never visited England, acquires, on the evidence of many magazine pictures of London, the belief that London is beautiful. He is happy to declare ‘Londres est jolie’. Pierre eventually moves to England and settles in one of the seedier areas of London, travelling only to comparably shabby neighbourhoods. He learns English by immersion, though he does not realize that ‘London’ and ‘Londres’ are co-referential. (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  30.  23
    Linguistic Aspects, Meaninglessness and Paradox: A Rejoinder to John David Stone. [REVIEW]Laurence Goldstein - 1980 - Linguistics and Philosophy 4 (4):579 - 592.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  31.  92
    Introduction.Laurence Goldstein - 2005 - The Monist 88 (1):3-10.
    According to some commentators, Wittgenstein’s Tractatus is all one big joke: we plough through the text trying to extract the sense out of each spare and heroic proposition, only to be told at the end, that anyone who understands the author will realize that all of his propositions are nonsensical and so are not even propositions. The whole work is a kind of hoax; the readers are ridiculed, but, with luck, will eventually have to laugh when they come to recognize (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  32.  57
    Farewell to Grelling.Laurence Goldstein - 2003 - Analysis 63 (1):31–32.
  33.  70
    Circular Queue Paradoxes – the Missing Link.Laurence Goldstein - 1999 - Analysis 59 (4):284–290.
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  34.  46
    The Sorites as a Lesson in Semantics.Laurence Goldstein - 1988 - Mind 97 (387):447-455.
  35.  62
    The title of this paper is 'quotation'.Laurence Goldstein - 1985 - Analysis 45 (3):137.
    Direct download (6 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  36. The Barber, Russell's Paradox, Catch-22, God, Contradiction, and More.Laurence Goldstein - 2006 - In Graham Priest, J. C. Beall & Bradley Armour-Garb (eds.), The Law of Non-Contradiction: New Philosophical Essays. Clarendon Press.
  37. How to Boil a Live Frog.Laurence Goldstein - 2000 - Analysis 60 (2):170–178.
  38.  25
    Strengthened Paradoxes.Laurence Goldstein & Leonard Goddard - 1980 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 58 (3):211 – 221.
  39. Russell, Edward Lear, Plato, Zeno, Grelling, Eubulides.Laurence Goldstein - 2005 - The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 1.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  40.  23
    A Buridanian Discussion of Desire, Murder and Democracy.Laurence Goldstein - 1992 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 70 (4):405 – 414.
  41. Wittgenstein as Soil.Laurence Goldstein - 2004 - In Max Kölbel & Bernhard Weiss (eds.), Wittgenstein's Lasting Significance. Routledge.
    Wittgenstein likened himself to a soil distinctive only in that once implanted with the seeds of great thinkers, interesting flora grew. This chapter examines the influence on him of authors he regarded as truly original, such as Bolzmann, Hertz, Schopenhauer, Frege and Russell.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  42. Reasoning Without Contradiction.Laurence Goldstein - 2012 - The Reasoner 6 (12):183-184.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43. A Problem For The Dialetheist.Laurence Goldstein - 1986 - Bulletin of the Section of Logic 15 (1):10-13.
    There has recently been revived logical interest, particularly in the context of attempts to solve the logico-semantical paradoxes, of the idea that there are true contracistions, and of semantics accomodating the glut value both true and false. By considering some generally accepted claims about assertion. I attempt to show that this dialetheist idea is untenable.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  44.  90
    A Non-Theistic Cosmology and Natural History.Laurence Goldstein - 2006 - Analysis 66 (3):256-260.
    The plausibility of the theory of evolution depends on abandoning the assumption of a unique 'big bang' ex nihilo marking the beginning of the universe.
    No categories
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  28
    Wittgenstein, Semantics and Connectionism.Laurence Goldstein & Hartley Slater - 1998 - Philosophical Investigations 21 (4):293–314.
  46.  25
    Scientific Scotism - the Emperor's New Trousers or has Armstrong Made Some Real Strides?Laurence Goldstein - 1983 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 61 (1):40 – 57.
    (1983). Scientific scotism — The emperor's new trousers or has armstrong made some real strides? Australasian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 61, No. 1, pp. 40-57.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  47.  21
    Unassertion.Laurence Goldstein - 1988 - Philosophia 18 (1):119-121.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  48.  15
    Smooth and Rough Logic.Laurence Goldstein - 1992 - Philosophical Investigations 15 (2):93-110.
  49.  85
    The Indefinability of €œOne”.Laurence Goldstein - 2002 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 31 (1):29-42.
    Logicism is one of the great reductionist projects. Numbers and the relationships in which they stand may seem to possess suspect ontological credentials – to be entia non grata – and, further, to be beyond the reach of knowledge. In seeking to reduce mathematics to a small set of principles that form the logical basis of all reasoning, logicism holds out the prospect of ontological economy and epistemological security. This paper attempts to show that a fundamental logicist project, that of (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  83
    Wittgenstein and Situation Comedy.Laurence Goldstein - 2009 - Philosophia 37 (4):605-627.
    Wittgenstein discusses speakers exploiting context to inject meaning into the sentences that they use. One facet of situation comedy is context-injected ambiguity, where scriptwriters artfully construct situations such that, because of conflicting contextual clues, a character, though uttering a sentence that contains neither ambiguous words nor amphibolous contruction may plausibly be interpreted in at least two distinct ways. This highlights an important distinction between the (concise) sentence that a speaker uses and what the speaker means, the disclosure of which may (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 94