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Lawrence Nolan [22]Lawrence Patrick Nolan [1]
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Lawrence Nolan
California State University, Long Beach
  1. The Third Meditation: Causal Arguments for God's Existence.Lawrence Nolan - 2014 - In David Cunning (ed.), Cambridge Companion to Descartes' Meditations. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press. pp. 127-48.
  2.  22
    The Cambridge Descartes Lexicon.Lawrence Nolan (ed.) - 2016 - New York, USA: Cambridge University Press.
    The Cambridge Descartes Lexicon is the definitive reference source on René Descartes, 'the father of modern philosophy' and arguably among the most important philosophers of all time. Examining the full range of Descartes' achievements and legacy, it includes 256 in-depth entries that explain key concepts relating to his thought. Cumulatively they uncover interpretative disputes, trace his influences, and explain how his work was received by critics and developed by followers. There are entries on topics such as certainty, cogito ergo sum, (...)
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  3. Malebranche on Sensory Cognition and "Seeing As".Lawrence Nolan - 2012 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (1):21-52.
    Nicolas Malebranche holds that we see all things in the physical world by means of ideas in God (the doctrine of "vision in God"). In some writings he seems to posit ideas of particular bodies in God, but when pressed by critics he insists that there is only one general idea of extension, which he calls “intelligible extension.” But how can this general and “pure” idea represent particular sensible objects? I develop systematic solutions to this and two other putative difficulties (...)
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  4.  99
    Reductionism and Nominalism in Descartes's Theory of Attributes.Lawrence Nolan - 1997 - Topoi 16 (2):129-140.
  5. The Ontological Status of Cartesian Natures.Lawrence Nolan - 1997 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 78 (2):169–194.
    In the Fifth Meditation, Descartes makes a remarkable claim about the ontological status of geometrical figures. He asserts that an object such as a triangle has a 'true and immutable nature' that does not depend on the mind, yet has being even if there are no triangles existing in the world. This statement has led many commentators to assume that Descartes is a Platonist regarding essences and in the philosophy of mathematics. One problem with this seemingly natural reading is that (...)
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  6. Primary and Secondary Qualities: The Historical and Ongoing Debate.Lawrence Nolan (ed.) - 2011 - Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press.
    The essays collected here cover a wide range of topics, including the foundation for the distinction, the question of whether or not it is metaphysical or ...
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  7. Proofs for the Existence of God.Lawrence Nolan & Alan Nelson - 2006 - In Stephen Gaukroger (ed.), The Blackwell to Descartes’ Meditations. Blackwell. pp. 104--121.
    We argue that Descartes’s theistic proofs in the ’Meditations’ are much simpler and straightforward than they are traditionally taken to be. In particular, we show how the causal argument of the "Third Meditation" depends on the intuitively innocent principle that nothing comes from nothing, and not on the more controversial principle that the objective reality of an idea must have a cause with at least as much formal reality. We also demonstrate that the so-called ontological "argument" of the "Fifth Meditation" (...)
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  8. "Proofs for the Existence of God," in The Blackwell Guide to Descartes’ Meditations.Lawrence Nolan & Alan Nelson - 2006 - Blackwell.
    We argue that Descartes's theistic proofs in the 'Meditations' are much simpler and straightforward than they are traditionally taken to be. In particular, we show how the causal argument of the "Third Meditation" depends on the intuitively innocent principle that nothing comes from nothing, and not on the more controversial principle that the objective reality of an idea must have a cause with at least as much formal reality. We also demonstrate that the so-called ontological "argument" of the "Fifth Meditation" (...)
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  9.  81
    Descartes' Theory of Universals.Lawrence Nolan - 1998 - Philosophical Studies 89 (2-3):161-180.
  10. Cartesian Trialism on Trial: The Conceptualist Account of Descartes’ Human Being.Lawrence Nolan - 2015 - In Patricia Easton & Kurt Smith (eds.), The Battle of the Gods and Giants Redux. Leiden, The Netherlands: Brill. pp. 137-74.
     
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  11.  99
    The Ontological Argument as an Exercise in Cartesian Therapy.Lawrence Nolan - 2005 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 35 (4):521 - 562.
    I argue that Descartes intended the so-called ontological "argument" as a self-validating intuition, rather than as a formal proof. The textual evidence for this view is highly compelling, but the strongest support comes from understanding Descartes's diagnosis for why God's existence is not 'immediately' self-evident to everyone and the method of analysis that he develops for making it self-evident. The larger aim of the paper is to use the ontological argument as a case study of Descartes's nonformalist theory of deduction (...)
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  12.  38
    Descartes on "What We Call Color".Lawrence Nolan - 2011 - In Primary and Secondary Qualities: The Historical and Ongoing Debate. Oxford University Press. pp. 81.
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  13. To a Reader Voyaging Through the Meditations for the First Time, Descartes' Proofs for the Existence of God Can Seem Daunting, Especially the Argument of Meditation III, with its Appeal to Causal Principles That Seem Arcane, and to Medieval Doctrines About Different Modes of Being and Degrees of Reality. First-Time Readers Are Not Alone in Feeling Bewildered. Many Commentators Have Had the Same Reaction. In an Attempt at Charity, Some of Them Have Tried to Tame the Complexity of Descartes' Discussion by .. [REVIEW]Lawrence Nolan & Alan Nelson - 2006 - In Stephen Gaukroger (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Descartes' Meditations. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 2--104.
     
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  14.  32
    Malebranche's Theory of Ideas and Vision in God.Lawrence Nolan - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  15. The Dustbin Theory of Mind: A Cartesian Legacy?Lawrence Nolan & John Whipple - 2006 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 3:33-55.
  16.  79
    Self-Knowledge in Descartes and Malebranche.Lawrence Nolan & John Whipple - 2005 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 43 (1):55-81.
  17.  2
    Reductionism and Nominalism in Descartes's Theory of Attributes', Topoi 16: 129-40.Lawrence Nolan - 1997 - Topoi 16 (2):129-40.
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  18.  12
    Insight and Inference: Descartes’s Founding Principle and Modern Philosophy. [REVIEW]Lawrence Nolan - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (1):105-108.
    This long and ambitious work offers a systematic interpretation of Cartesian metaphysics and epistemology from the perspective of Descartes’s so-called founding principle, cogito ergo sum. The book is organized around the three parts of this famous dictum, though its scope is much more encompassing. Part 1 offers a careful analysis of the “formal structure” of Cartesian thought, in an effort to identify what is distinctive about the cogito and to uncover how Descartes’s theory of mind makes this insight possible. Part (...)
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  19.  84
    Insight and Inference: Descartes’s Founding Principle and Modern Philosophy.Lawrence Nolan - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (1):105-108.
    This long and ambitious work offers a systematic interpretation of Cartesian metaphysics and epistemology from the perspective of Descartes’s so-called founding principle, cogito ergo sum. The book is organized around the three parts of this famous dictum, though its scope is much more encompassing. Part 1 offers a careful analysis of the “formal structure” of Cartesian thought, in an effort to identify what is distinctive about the cogito and to uncover how Descartes’s theory of mind makes this insight possible. Part (...)
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  20.  13
    Review of W. J. Mander, The Philosophy of John Norris[REVIEW]Lawrence Nolan - 2009 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (3).
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  21. Descartes on Universal Essences and Divine Knowledge.Lawrence Nolan - 2017 - In Tad Schmaltz & Stefano Di Bella (eds.), The Problem of Universals in Early Modern Philosophy. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 87-116.
     
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