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Profile: Leah Kalmanson (Drake University)
  1.  94
    Levinas in Japan: The Ethics of Alterity and the Philosophy of No-Self.Leah Kalmanson - 2010 - Continental Philosophy Review 43 (2):193-206.
    Does the Buddhist doctrine of no-self imply, simply put, no-other? Does this doctrine necessarily come into conflict with an ethics premised on the alterity of the other? This article explores these questions by situating Emmanuel Levinas’s ethics in the context of contemporary Japanese philosophy. The work of twentieth-century Japanese philosopher Watsuji Tetsurō provides a starting point from which to consider the ethics of the self-other relation in light of the Buddhist notion of emptiness. The philosophy of thirteenth-century Zen Master Dōgen (...)
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  2.  3
    The Ritual Methods of Comparative Philosophy.Leah Kalmanson - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (2):399-418.
    Whoever writes in blood and aphorisms does not want to be read, but rather to be learned by heart.Here's what is necessary: one blow with a club, one scar; one slap on the face, a handful of blood. Your reading of what other people write should be just like this. Don't be lax!In several recent articles, Leigh Kathryn Jenco questions the use of Eurocentric methodologies in conducting cross-cultural research within and about Chinese traditions.3 As she says, "postcolonial and 'non-Western' societies (...)
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  3.  9
    If You Show Me Yours: Reading All “Difference” as “Colonial Difference” in Comparative Philosophy.Leah Kalmanson - 2015 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 7 (2):201-213.
    Postcolonial studies and decolonial theory make visible the nature and extent of Eurocentrism through a critique of constructed categories as basic as “history” and “culture.” Walter Mignolo asserts a strong claim that the concept of “culture” is itself a colonial construction, and hence all cultural difference bears the mark of coloniality. This thesis presents a challenge to the field of comparative philosophy: What does “cross-cultural” philosophy even mean if all so-called cultural difference is indeed colonial difference? Could comparativists, in the (...)
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  4.  28
    Buddhism and Bell Hooks: Liberatory Aesthetics and the Radical Subjectivity of No-Self.Leah Kalmanson - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (4):810-827.
    This article engages bell hooks's concept of �radical black subjectivity� through the lens of the Buddhist doctrine of no-self. Relying on the Zen theorist D?gen and on resources from Japanese aesthetics, I argue that non-attachment to the self clarifies hooks's claim that radical subjectivity unites our capacity for critical resistance with our capacity to appreciate beauty. I frame this argument in terms of hooks's concern that postmodernist identity critiques dismiss the identity claims of disempowered peoples. On the one hand, identity (...)
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  5.  19
    Review of Robert Wilkinson, Nishida and Western Philosophy. [REVIEW]Leah Kalmanson - 2011 - Sophia 50 (3):505-507.
  6.  10
    “The Bottomless Brightness of the Open Expanse”.Leah Kalmanson - 2012 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (2):283 - 293.
    The recently published collection Japanese and Continental Philosophy: Conversations with the Kyoto School, edited by Bret Davis, Brian Schroeder, and Jason Wirth, gathers together the best in contemporary scholarship on the Kyoto School and its legacy. This review essay is an opportunity to raise questions about the implications of this scholarship and to reflect critically on the future of the field. Although early Kyoto School philosophers are renowned for their lofty intellectual rigor, almost every one at some point bemoaned the (...)
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  7. Buddhist Responses to Globalization.Leah Kalmanson & James Mark Shields (eds.) - 2014 - Lexington Books.
    This interdisciplinary collection of essays highlights the relevance of Buddhist doctrine and practice to issues of globalization. From philosophical, religious, historical, and political perspectives, the authors show that Buddhism—arguably the world’s first transnational religion—is a rich resource for navigating todays interconnected world.
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  8.  4
    Levinas and Asian Thought.Leah Kalmanson, Frank Garrett & Sarah Mattice (eds.) - 2013 - Duquesne University Press.
    While influential works have been devoted to comparative studies of various Asian philosophies and continental philosophers such as Nietzsche, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, and Derrida, this collection is the first to fully treat the increased interest in intercultural and interdisciplinary studies related to the work of Emmanuel Levinas in such a context. Levinas and Asian Thought seeks to discover common ground between Levinas’s ethical project and various religious and philosophical traditions of Asia such as Mahāyāna Buddhism, Theravādic Buddhism, Vedism, Confucianism, Daoism, and (...)
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  9. William Edeglass Et Al.: Facing Nature: Levinas and Environmental Thought. [REVIEW]Leah Kalmanson - 2013 - Environmental Ethics 35 (4):501-502.
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