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  1.  22
    National Standards for Public Involvement in Research: Missing the Forest for the Trees.Matthew S. McCoy, Karin Rolanda Jongsma, Phoebe Friesen, Michael Dunn, Carolyn Plunkett Neuhaus, Leah Rand & Mark Sheehan - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (12):801-804.
    Biomedical research funding bodies across Europe and North America increasingly encourage—and, in some cases, require—investigators to involve members of the public in funded research. Yet there remains a striking lack of clarity about what ‘good’ or ‘successful’ public involvement looks like. In an effort to provide guidance to investigators and research organisations, representatives of several key research funding bodies in the UK recently came together to develop the National Standards for Public Involvement in Research. The Standards have critical implications for (...)
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  2. Prior Authorization as a Potential Support of Patient-Centered Care.Leah Rand & Zackary Berger - 2018 - Patient 4 (11):371-375.
    We discuss the role of prior authorization (PA) in supporting patient-centered care (PCC) by directing health system resources and thus the ability to better meet the needs of individual patients. We begin with an account of PCC as a standard that should be aimed for in patient care. In order to achieve widespread PCC, appropriate resource management is essential in a healthcare system. This brings us to PA, and we present an idealized view of PA in order to argue how (...)
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  3.  8
    Patient and Public Involvement: Two Sides of the Same Coin or Different Coins Altogether?Matthew S. McCoy, Jonathan Warsh, Leah Rand, Michael Parker & Mark Sheehan - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (6):708-715.
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    Are Medicaid Closed Formularies Unethical? Social Values and Limit-Setting.Leah Rand & Govind Persad - 2019 - AMA Journal of Ethics 21 (8):E654-E660.
    State Medicaid programs have proposed closed formularies to limit spending on drugs. Closed formularies can be justified when they enable spending on other socially valuable aims. However, it is still necessary to justify guidelines informing formulary design, which can be done through a process of decision making that includes the public. This article examines criticisms that Medicaid closed formularies limit deliberation about decisions that affect drug access and unfairly disadvantage poor patients. Although unfairness to poor patients is a risk, it (...)
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