Search results for 'Learning physiology' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  29
    Robyn Barnacle (2009). Gut Instinct: The Body and Learning. Educational Philosophy and Theory 41 (1):22-33.
    In the current socio-political climate pedagogies consistent with rationalism are in the ascendancy. One way to challenge the purchase of rationalism within educational discourse and practice is through the body, or by re-thinking the nature of mind-body relations. While the orientation of this paper is ultimately phenomenological, it takes as its point of departure recent feminist scholarship, which is demonstrating that attending to physiology can provide insight into the complexity of mind-body relations. Elizabeth Wilson's account of the role of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  2.  4
    David J. Stevens, Joanne Arciuli & David I. Anderson (2015). Concurrent Movement Impairs Incidental But Not Intentional Statistical Learning. Cognitive Science 39 (5):1081-1098.
    The effect of concurrent movement on incidental versus intentional statistical learning was examined in two experiments. In Experiment 1, participants learned the statistical regularities embedded within familiarization stimuli implicitly, whereas in Experiment 2 they were made aware of the embedded regularities and were instructed explicitly to learn these regularities. Experiment 1 demonstrated that while the control group were able to learn the statistical regularities, the resistance-free cycling group and the exercise group did not demonstrate learning. This is in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  3.  2
    S. Devriese, W. Winters, I. van Diest & O. van den Bergh (2004). Contingency Awareness in a Symptom Learning Paradigm: Necessary but Not Sufficient? Consciousness and Cognition 13 (3):439-452.
    In previous studies, we found that bodily symptoms can be learned in a differential conditioning paradigm, using odors as conditioned stimuli and CO2-enriched air as unconditioned stimulus . However, this only occurred when the odor CS had a negative valence , and tended to be more pronounced in persons scoring high for Negative Affectivity . This paper considers the necessity and/or sufficiency of awareness of the CS–US contingency in three studies using this paradigm. The relation between contingency awareness and the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  54
    Silvia A. Bunge & Jonathan D. Wallis (eds.) (2008). Neuroscience of Rule-Guided Behavior. Oxford University Press.
    euroscience of Rule-Guided Behavior brings together, for the first time, the experiments and theories that have created the new science of rules. Rules are central to human behavior, but until now the field of neuroscience lacked a synthetic approach to understanding them. How are rules learned, retrieved from memory, maintained in consciousness and implemented? How are they used to solve problems and select among actions and activities? How are the various levels of rules represented in the brain, ranging from simple (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Mario von Cranach (1976). Methods Of Inference From Animal To Human Behaviour. The Hague: Mouton.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Alan M. Turing (1950). Computing Machinery and Intelligence. Mind 59 (October):433-60.
    I propose to consider the question, "Can machines think?" This should begin with definitions of the meaning of the terms "machine" and "think." The definitions might be framed so as to reflect so far as possible the normal use of the words, but this attitude is dangerous, If the meaning of the words "machine" and "think" are to be found by examining how they are commonly used it is difficult to escape the conclusion that the meaning and the answer to (...)
    Direct download (19 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   249 citations  
  7.  57
    Abraham I. Melden (1961). Free Action. Routledge.
  8.  93
    George M. Wyburn, Ralph W. Pickford & R. J. Hirst (1964). Human Senses And Perception. University Of Toronto Press,.
  9. Antti Revonsuo (2000). The Reinterpretation of Dreams: An Evolutionary Hypothesis of the Function of Dreaming. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):877-901.
    Several theories claim that dreaming is a random by-product of REM sleep physiology and that it does not serve any natural function. Phenomenal dream content, however, is not as disorganized as such views imply. The form and content of dreams is not random but organized and selective: during dreaming, the brain constructs a complex model of the world in which certain types of elements, when compared to waking life, are underrepresented whereas others are over represented. Furthermore, dream content is (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   35 citations  
  10.  50
    Wolf Singer (1993). Synchronization of Cortical Activity and its Putative Role in Information Processing and Learning. Annual Review of Physiology 55:349-74.
  11.  3
    Alfredo Pereira Jr, Maria AliceOrnellas Pereira & FábioAugusto Furlan (2011). Recent Advances in Brain Physiology and Cognitive Processing. Mens Sana Monographs 9 (1):183.
    The discovery of participation of astrocytes as active elements in glutamatergic tripartite synapses (composed by functional units of two neurons and one astrocyte) has led to the construction of models of cognitive functioning in the human brain, focusing on associative learning, sensory integration, conscious processing and memory formation/retrieval. We have modelled human cognitive functions by means of an ensemble of functional units (tripartite synapses) connected by gap junctions that link distributed astrocytes, allowing the formation of intra- and intercellular calcium (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Dara Llewellyn & Craig Pearson (eds.) (2011). Consciousness-Based Education: A Foundation for Teaching and Learning in the Academic Disciplines. Consciousness-Based Books, an Imprint of Maharishi University of Management Press.
    Consciousness-based education and Maharishi Vedic science -- Consciousness-based education and education -- Consciousness-based education and physiology and health -- Consciousness-based education and physics -- Consciousness-based education and mathematics -- Consciousness-based education and literature -- Consciousness-based education and art -- Consciousness-based education and management -- Consciousness-based education and government -- Consciousness-based education and computer science -- Consciousness-based education and sustainability -- Consciousness-based education and world peace.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Stephen Downes (2010). Learning Networks and Connective Knowledge. In Harrison Hao Yang & Steve Chi-Yin Yuen (eds.), Collective Intelligence and E-Learning 2.0: Implications of Web-Based Communities and Networking. IGI Global
    The purpose of this chapter is to outline some of the thinking behind new e-learning technology, including e-portfolios and personal learning environments. Part of this thinking is centered around the theory of connectivism, which asserts that knowledge - and therefore the learning of knowledge - is distributive, that is, not located in any given place (and therefore not 'transferred' or 'transacted' per se) but rather consists of the network of connections formed from experience and interactions with a (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  23
    Chase E. Thiel, Shane Connelly, Lauren Harkrider, Lynn D. Devenport, Zhanna Bagdasarov, James F. Johnson & Michael D. Mumford (2013). Case-Based Knowledge and Ethics Education: Improving Learning and Transfer Through Emotionally Rich Cases. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (1):265-286.
    Case-based instruction is a stable feature of ethics education, however, little is known about the attributes of the cases that make them effective. Emotions are an inherent part of ethical decision-making and one source of information actively stored in case-based knowledge, making them an attribute of cases that likely facilitates case-based learning. Emotions also make cases more realistic, an essential component for effective case-based instruction. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of emotional case content, and (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   19 citations  
  15.  27
    Bente Elkjaer (2009). Pragmatism : A Learning Theory for the Future. In Knud Illeris (ed.), Contemporary Theories of Learning: Learning Theorists -- In Their Own Words. Routledge 74-89.
    Danish Bente Elkjaer holds a Chair in learning theory at the University of Aarhus. She is also Editor-in-Chief of the journal “Manament Learning”. Her main focus is working life learning and her theoretical approach is inspired by the works of the American pragmatist philosopher and educator, John Dewey. In 2005 she published a book, “When Learning goes to Work: a pragmatist gaze at working life learning” (in Danish). In the following chapter, which is published for (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  34
    Chris J. Mitchell, Jan De Houwer & Peter F. Lovibond (2009). The Propositional Nature of Human Associative Learning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (2):183-198.
    The past 50 years have seen an accumulation of evidence suggesting that associative learning depends on high-level cognitive processes that give rise to propositional knowledge. Yet, many learning theorists maintain a belief in a learning mechanism in which links between mental representations are formed automatically. We characterize and highlight the differences between the propositional and link approaches, and review the relevant empirical evidence. We conclude that learning is the consequence of propositional reasoning processes that cooperate with (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   27 citations  
  17. Ariel S. Cecchi (2014). Cognitive Penetration, Perceptual Learning and Neural Plasticity. Dialectica 68 (1):63-95.
    Cognitive penetration of perception, broadly understood, is the influence that the cognitive system has on a perceptual system. The paper shows a form of cognitive penetration in the visual system which I call ‘architectural’. Architectural cognitive penetration is the process whereby the behaviour or the structure of the perceptual system is influenced by the cognitive system, which consequently may have an impact on the content of the perceptual experience. I scrutinize a study in perceptual learning that provides empirical evidence (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  18.  52
    Alison Gopnik & Laura Schulz (eds.) (2007). Causal Learning: Psychology, Philosophy, and Computation. Oxford University Press.
    Understanding causal structure is a central task of human cognition. Causal learning underpins the development of our concepts and categories, our intuitive theories, and our capacities for planning, imagination and inference. During the last few years, there has been an interdisciplinary revolution in our understanding of learning and reasoning: Researchers in philosophy, psychology, and computation have discovered new mechanisms for learning the causal structure of the world. This new work provides a rigorous, formal basis for theory theories (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   19 citations  
  19. Arthur S. Reber (1993). Implicit Learning and Tacit Knowledge: An Essay on the Cognitive Unconscious. Oxford University Press.
    In this new volume in the Oxford Psychology Series, the author presents a highly readable account of the cognitive unconscious, focusing in particular on the problem of implicit learning. Implicit learning is defined as the acquisition of knowledge that takes place independently of the conscious attempts to learn and largely in the absence of explicit knowledge about what was acquired. One of the core assumptions of this argument is that implicit learning is a fundamental, "root" process, one (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   65 citations  
  20.  32
    Kenny Smith, Andrew D. M. Smith & Richard A. Blythe (2011). Cross-Situational Learning: An Experimental Study of Word-Learning Mechanisms. Cognitive Science 35 (3):480-498.
    Cross-situational learning is a mechanism for learning the meaning of words across multiple exposures, despite exposure-by-exposure uncertainty as to the word's true meaning. We present experimental evidence showing that humans learn words effectively using cross-situational learning, even at high levels of referential uncertainty. Both overall success rates and the time taken to learn words are affected by the degree of referential uncertainty, with greater referential uncertainty leading to less reliable, slower learning. Words are also learned less (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   14 citations  
  21.  16
    Daniel Yurovsky, Chen Yu & Linda B. Smith (2013). Competitive Processes in Cross‐Situational Word Learning. Cognitive Science 37 (5):891-921.
    Cross-situational word learning, like any statistical learning problem, involves tracking the regularities in the environment. However, the information that learners pick up from these regularities is dependent on their learning mechanism. This article investigates the role of one type of mechanism in statistical word learning: competition. Competitive mechanisms would allow learners to find the signal in noisy input and would help to explain the speed with which learners succeed in statistical learning tasks. Because cross-situational word (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  22. David R. Shanks & M. F. St John (1994). Characteristics of Dissociable Human Learning Systems. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):367-447.
    A number of ways of taxonomizing human learning have been proposed. We examine the evidence for one such proposal, namely, that there exist independent explicit and implicit learning systems. This combines two further distinctions, (1) between learning that takes place with versus without concurrent awareness, and (2) between learning that involves the encoding of instances (or fragments) versus the induction of abstract rules or hypotheses. Implicit learning is assumed to involve unconscious rule learning. We (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   54 citations  
  23.  6
    Thomas L. Griffiths & Michael L. Kalish (2007). Language Evolution by Iterated Learning With Bayesian Agents. Cognitive Science 31 (3):441-480.
    Languages are transmitted from person to person and generation to generation via a process of iterated learning: people learn a language from other people who once learned that language themselves. We analyze the consequences of iterated learning for learning algorithms based on the principles of Bayesian inference, assuming that learners compute a posterior distribution over languages by combining a prior (representing their inductive biases) with the evidence provided by linguistic data. We show that when learners sample languages (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   19 citations  
  24.  29
    Afsaneh Fazly, Afra Alishahi & Suzanne Stevenson (2010). A Probabilistic Computational Model of Cross-Situational Word Learning. Cognitive Science 34 (6):1017-1063.
    Words are the essence of communication: They are the building blocks of any language. Learning the meaning of words is thus one of the most important aspects of language acquisition: Children must first learn words before they can combine them into complex utterances. Many theories have been developed to explain the impressive efficiency of young children in acquiring the vocabulary of their language, as well as the developmental patterns observed in the course of lexical acquisition. A major source of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  25.  16
    Jacob Beck (2017). Can Bootstrapping Explain Concept Learning? Cognition 158:110–121.
    Susan Carey's account of Quinean bootstrapping has been heavily criticized. While it purports to explain how important new concepts are learned, many commentators complain that it is unclear just what bootstrapping is supposed to be or how it is supposed to work. Others allege that bootstrapping falls prey to the circularity challenge: it cannot explain how new concepts are learned without presupposing that learners already have those very concepts. Drawing on discussions of concept learning from the philosophical literature, this (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  15
    Haley A. Vlach & Catherine M. Sandhofer (2014). Retrieval Dynamics and Retention in Cross‐Situational Statistical Word Learning. Cognitive Science 38 (4):757-774.
    Previous research on cross-situational word learning has demonstrated that learners are able to reduce ambiguity in mapping words to referents by tracking co-occurrence probabilities across learning events. In the current experiments, we examined whether learners are able to retain mappings over time. The results revealed that learners are able to retain mappings for up to 1 week later. However, there were interactions between the amount of retention and the different learning conditions. Interestingly, the strongest retention was associated (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  27. Peter Hiscock (2014). Learning in Lithic Landscapes: A Reconsideration of the Hominid “Toolmaking” Niche. Biological Theory 9 (1):27-41.
    This article reconsiders the early hominid ‘‘lithic niche’’ by examining the social implications of stone artifact making. I reject the idea that making tools for use is an adequate explanation of the elaborate artifact forms of the Lower Palaeolithic, or a sufficient cause for long-term trends in hominid technology. I then advance an alternative mechanism founded on the claim that competency in making stone artifacts requires extended learning, and that excellence in artifact making is attained only by highly skilled (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  28.  27
    Michael Ramscar, Peter Hendrix, Cyrus Shaoul, Petar Milin & Harald Baayen (2014). The Myth of Cognitive Decline: Non‐Linear Dynamics of Lifelong Learning. Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (1):5-42.
    As adults age, their performance on many psychometric tests changes systematically, a finding that is widely taken to reveal that cognitive information-processing capacities decline across adulthood. Contrary to this, we suggest that older adults'; changing performance reflects memory search demands, which escalate as experience grows. A series of simulations show how the performance patterns observed across adulthood emerge naturally in learning models as they acquire knowledge. The simulations correctly identify greater variation in the cognitive performance of older adults, and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  29.  22
    Elisabeth Norman, Mark C. Price & Simon C. Duff (2006). Fringe Consciousness in Sequence Learning: The Influence of Individual Differences. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (4):723-760.
    We first describe how the concept of “fringe consciousness” can characterise gradations of consciousness between the extremes of implicit and explicit learning. We then show that the NEO-PI-R personality measure of openness to feelings, chosen to reflect the ability to introspect on fringe feelings, influences both learning and awareness in the serial reaction time task under conditions that have previously been associated with implicit learning . This provides empirical evidence for the proposed phenomenology and functional role of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   18 citations  
  30.  70
    Andreas Matthias (2004). The Responsibility Gap: Ascribing Responsibility for the Actions of Learning Automata. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 6 (3):175-183.
    Traditionally, the manufacturer/operator of a machine is held (morally and legally) responsible for the consequences of its operation. Autonomous, learning machines, based on neural networks, genetic algorithms and agent architectures, create a new situation, where the manufacturer/operator of the machine is in principle not capable of predicting the future machine behaviour any more, and thus cannot be held morally responsible or liable for it. The society must decide between not using this kind of machine any more (which is not (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   20 citations  
  31.  33
    E. Alpay (2013). Student-Inspired Activities for the Teaching and Learning of Engineering Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (4):1455-1468.
    Ethics teaching in engineering can be problematic because of student perceptions of its subjective, ambiguous and philosophical content. The use of discipline-specific case studies has helped to address such perceptions, as has practical decision making and problem solving approaches based on some ethical frameworks. However, a need exists for a wider range of creative methods in ethics education to help complement the variety of activities and learning experiences within the engineering curriculum. In this work, a novel approach is presented (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  32. Jennifer Culbertson, Paul Smolensky & Colin Wilson (2013). Cognitive Biases, Linguistic Universals, and Constraint‐Based Grammar Learning. Topics in Cognitive Science 5 (3):392-424.
    According to classical arguments, language learning is both facilitated and constrained by cognitive biases. These biases are reflected in linguistic typology—the distribution of linguistic patterns across the world's languages—and can be probed with artificial grammar experiments on child and adult learners. Beginning with a widely successful approach to typology (Optimality Theory), and adapting techniques from computational approaches to statistical learning, we develop a Bayesian model of cognitive biases and show that it accounts for the detailed pattern of results (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  33.  13
    Ramsey Affifi (2013). Learning Plants: Semiosis Between the Parts and the Whole. [REVIEW] Biosemiotics 6 (3):547-559.
    In this article, I explore plant semiosis with a focus on plant learning. I distinguish between the scales and levels of learning conceivable in phytosemiosis, and identify organism-scale learning as the distinguishing question for plant semiosis. Since organism-scale learning depends on organism-scale semiosis, I critically review the arguments regarding whole-plant functional cycles. I conclude that they have largely relied on Uexküllian biases that have prevented an adequate interpretation of modern plant neurobiology. Through an examination of trophic (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  34.  14
    Terry Hyland (2011). Mindfulness and Learning: Celebrating the Affective Dimension of Education. Springer Verlag.
    The result is a one-dimensional, economistic and bleakly utilitarian conception of the educational task.In Mindfulness and Learning: Celebrating the Affective Dimension of Education, Terry Hyland advances the thesis that education stands in ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  35.  34
    Gary Hatfield (1992). Descartes' Physiology and its Relation to His Psychology. In John Cottingham (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Descartes. Cambridge University Press 335--370.
    Descartes understood the subject matter of physics (or natural philosophy) to encompass the whole of nature, including living things. It therefore comprised not only nonvital phenomena, including those we would now denominate as physical, chemical, minerological, magnetic, and atmospheric; it also extended to the world of plants and animals, including the human animal (with the exception of those aspects of the human mind that Descartes assigned to solely to thinking substance: pure intellect and will). Descartes wrote extensively on physiology (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   33 citations  
  36.  13
    Elijah Chudnoff (forthcoming). The Epistemic Significance of Perceptual Learning. Inquiry.
    First impressions suggest the following contrast between perception and memory: perception generates new beliefs and reasons, justification, or evidence for those beliefs; memory preserves old beliefs and reasons, justification, or evidence for those beliefs. In this paper I argue that reflection on perceptual learning gives us reason to adopt an alternative picture on which perception plays both generative and preservative epistemic roles.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  25
    Kuo-Chin Chang, Tzung-Pei Hong & Shian-Shyong Tseng (1996). Machine Learning by Imitating Human Learning. Minds and Machines 6 (2):203-228.
    Learning general concepts in imperfect environments is difficult since training instances often include noisy data, inconclusive data, incomplete data, unknown attributes, unknown attribute values and other barriers to effective learning. It is well known that people can learn effectively in imperfect environments, and can manage to process very large amounts of data. Imitating human learning behavior therefore provides a useful model for machine learning in real-world applications. This paper proposes a new, more effective way to represent (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  25
    John A. Weber (2007). Business Ethics Training: Insights From Learning Theory. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 70 (1):61 - 85.
    This paper explores research in educational psychology and learning theory in a search for insights to enhance business ethics training Useful educational principles uncovered are then applied to the development of an ethics training initiative for sales professionals. The paper concludes with suggestions for future research to help enrich business ethics training.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   14 citations  
  39.  24
    Joanne Arciuli & Ian C. Simpson (2012). Statistical Learning Is Related to Reading Ability in Children and Adults. Cognitive Science 36 (2):286-304.
    There is little empirical evidence showing a direct link between a capacity for statistical learning (SL) and proficiency with natural language. Moreover, discussion of the role of SL in language acquisition has seldom focused on literacy development. Our study addressed these issues by investigating the relationship between SL and reading ability in typically developing children and healthy adults. We tested SL using visually presented stimuli within a triplet learning paradigm and examined reading ability by administering the Wide Range (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  40.  29
    Linda B. Smith, Eliana Colunga & Hanako Yoshida (2010). Knowledge as Process: Contextually Cued Attention and Early Word Learning. Cognitive Science 34 (7):1287-1314.
    Learning depends on attention. The processes that cue attention in the moment dynamically integrate learned regularities and immediate contextual cues. This paper reviews the extensive literature on cued attention and attentional learning in the adult literature and proposes that these fundamental processes are likely significant mechanisms of change in cognitive development. The value of this idea is illustrated using phenomena in children's novel word learning.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  41. Hong Liu, Bin Hu & Philip Moore (2015). HCI Model with Learning Mechanism for Cooperative Design in Pervasive Computing Environment. Journal of Internet Technology 16.
    This paper presents a human-computer interaction model with a three layers learning mechanism in a pervasive environment. We begin with a discussion around a number of important issues related to human-computer interaction followed by a description of the architecture for a multi-agent cooperative design system for pervasive computing environment. We present our proposed three- layer HCI model and introduce the group formation algorithm, which is predicated on a dynamic sharing niche technology. Finally, we explore the cooperative reinforcement learning (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Kevin Connolly (forthcoming). Sensory Substitution and Perceptual Learning. In Fiona Macpherson (ed.), Sensory Substitution and Augmentation. Oxford University Press
    When a user integrates a sensory substitution device into her life, the process involves perceptual learning, that is, ‘relatively long-lasting changes to an organism’s perceptual system that improve its ability to respond to its environment’ (Goldstone 1998: 585). In this paper, I explore ways in which the extensive literature on perceptual learning can be applied to help improve sensory substitution devices. I then use these findings to answer a philosophical question. Much of the philosophical debate surrounding sensory substitution (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  43.  59
    Ronald R. Sims & Edward L. Felton (2006). Designing and Delivering Business Ethics Teaching and Learning. Journal of Business Ethics 63 (3):297-312.
    The recent corporate scandals in the United States have caused a renewed interest and focus on teaching business ethics. Business schools and their faculties are reexamining the teaching of business ethics and are reassessing their responsibilities to produce honest and truthful managers who live lives of integrity and ethical accountability. The authors recognize that no agreement exists among business schools and their faculties regarding what should be the content and pedagogy of a course in business ethics. However, the authors hold (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  44.  37
    Charles Kemp, Noah D. Goodman & Joshua B. Tenenbaum (2010). Learning to Learn Causal Models. Cognitive Science 34 (7):1185-1243.
    Learning to understand a single causal system can be an achievement, but humans must learn about multiple causal systems over the course of a lifetime. We present a hierarchical Bayesian framework that helps to explain how learning about several causal systems can accelerate learning about systems that are subsequently encountered. Given experience with a set of objects, our framework learns a causal model for each object and a causal schema that captures commonalities among these causal models. The (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  45.  53
    Psyche Loui (2012). Learning and Liking of Melody and Harmony: Further Studies in Artificial Grammar Learning. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (4):554-567.
    Much of what we know and love about music is based on implicitly acquired mental representations of musical pitches and the relationships between them. While previous studies have shown that these mental representations of music can be acquired rapidly and can influence preference, it is still unclear which aspects of music influence learning and preference formation. This article reports two experiments that use an artificial musical system to examine two questions: (1) which aspects of music matter most for (...), and (2) which aspects of music matter most for preference formation. Two aspects of music are tested: melody and harmony. In Experiment 1 we tested the learning and liking of a new musical system that is manipulated melodically so that only some of the possible conditional probabilities between successive notes are presented. In Experiment 2 we administered the same tests for learning and liking, but we used a musical system that is manipulated harmonically to eliminate the property of harmonic whole-integer ratios between pitches. Results show that disrupting melody (Experiment 1) disabled the learning of music without disrupting preference formation, whereas disrupting harmony (Experiment 2) does not affect learning and memory but disrupts preference formation. Results point to a possible dissociation between learning and preference in musical knowledge. (shrink)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  46. Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (2011). Learning Matters: The Role of Learning in Concept Acquisition. Mind and Language 26 (5):507-539.
    In LOT 2: The Language of Thought Revisited, Jerry Fodor argues that concept learning of any kind—even for complex concepts—is simply impossible. In order to avoid the conclusion that all concepts, primitive and complex, are innate, he argues that concept acquisition depends on purely noncognitive biological processes. In this paper, we show (1) that Fodor fails to establish that concept learning is impossible, (2) that his own biological account of concept acquisition is unworkable, and (3) that there are (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  47.  51
    Tyson E. Lewis (2011). Rethinking the Learning Society: Giorgio Agamben on Studying, Stupidity, and Impotence. Studies in Philosophy and Education 30 (6):585-599.
    In this article, the author rethinks critiques of the learning society using Giorgio Agamben’s theory of potentiality. Summarizing several major contributions to our understanding of the limitations of the discourse of learning, the author proposes that critics thus far have failed to fully pinpoint the exact danger of learning. Importantly, learning is not only a rejection of the democratic or political dimension of education but it is first and foremost predicated on a false ontology of potentiality. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  48.  32
    Stanka A. Fitneva & Morten H. Christiansen (2011). Looking in the Wrong Direction Correlates With More Accurate Word Learning. Cognitive Science 35 (2):367-380.
    Previous research on lexical development has aimed to identify the factors that enable accurate initial word-referent mappings based on the assumption that the accuracy of initial word-referent associations is critical for word learning. The present study challenges this assumption. Adult English speakers learned an artificial language within a cross-situational learning paradigm. Visual fixation data were used to assess the direction of visual attention. Participants whose longest fixations in the initial trials fell more often on distracter images performed significantly (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  49.  52
    George Kachergis, Chen Yu & Richard M. Shiffrin (2013). Actively Learning Object Names Across Ambiguous Situations. Topics in Cognitive Science 5 (1):200-213.
    Previous research shows that people can use the co-occurrence of words and objects in ambiguous situations (i.e., containing multiple words and objects) to learn word meanings during a brief passive training period (Yu & Smith, 2007). However, learners in the world are not completely passive but can affect how their environment is structured by moving their heads, eyes, and even objects. These actions can indicate attention to a language teacher, who may then be more likely to name the attended objects. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  50.  25
    Michael Ramscar, Daniel Yarlett, Melody Dye, Katie Denny & Kirsten Thorpe (2010). The Effects of Feature-Label-Order and Their Implications for Symbolic Learning. Cognitive Science 34 (6):909-957.
    Symbols enable people to organize and communicate about the world. However, the ways in which symbolic knowledge is learned and then represented in the mind are poorly understood. We present a formal analysis of symbolic learning—in particular, word learning—in terms of prediction and cue competition, and we consider two possible ways in which symbols might be learned: by learning to predict a label from the features of objects and events in the world, and by learning to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000