Results for 'Lecture 2: Statements About The Past'

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  1.  10
    Lecture 2: Statements About the Past.Michael Dummett - 2003 - Journal of Philosophy 100 (1):26-37.
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  2.  12
    Lecture 2: Statements About the Past.Michael Dummett - 2003 - Journal of Philosophy 100 (1):26-37.
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  3. Lecture 2: Statements About the Past.Michael Dummett - 2003 - Journal of Philosophy 100 (1):26-37.
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  4. Lecture 1: The Concept of Truth.Lecture 2: Statements About The Past - 2003 - Journal of Philosophy 100 (1).
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  5.  40
    Statements About the Past.Richard K. Scheer - 1967 - Mind 76 (303):432-434.
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  6.  17
    I.—Statements About the Past: The Presidential Address.A. J. Ayer - 1952 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 52 (1):i-xx.
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  7.  5
    Statements About the Past and Future.Joseph Margolis - 1963 - Philosophical Review 72 (1):84-87.
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  8.  96
    Talking About the Past.Sam Baron - 2013 - Erkenntnis 78 (3):547-560.
    In this paper I consider the aboutness objection against standard truth-preserving presentism (STP). According to STP: (1) past-directed propositions (propositions that seem to be about the past) like , are sometimes true (2) truth supervenes on being and (3) the truth of past-directed propositions does not supervene on how things were, in the past. According to the aboutness objection (3) is implausible, given (1) and (2): for any proposition, P, P ought to be true in (...)
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  9.  54
    Thinking About the Past and Experiencing the Past.Dorothea Debus - 2013 - Mind and Language 28 (1):20-54.
    The present article aims to show that a subject can only fully grasp the concept of the past if she has some experiential, or recollective, memories of particular past events. More specifically, I argue that (1) in order for a subject to understand the concept of the past, it is necessary that the subject understand the concept of a particular past event in such a way that it might contribute to her understanding of the concept of (...)
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  10.  69
    At T-Time, the Inchoative Nick of Time, and “Statements About the Past”: Time and History in the Analytic Philosophy of Language.Géza Kállay - 2011 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (3):322-351.
    The paper, drawing on articles by J. M. E. McTaggart, G. E. Moore, D. Davidson, J. L. Austin, B. Russell, A. J. Ayer and G. E. M. Anscombe, argues that the philosophy of language in the analytic tradition has developed an “inchoative“ view of time, and history is a problem as regards the existence of events in the past and how these events can be known. An alternative view is hinted at through the work of L. Wittgenstein and S. (...)
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  11. Differences in the Evaluation of Generic Statements About Human and Non‐Human Categories.Arber Tasimi, Susan Gelman, Andrei Cimpian & Joshua Knobe - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (7):1934-1957.
    Generic statements express generalizations about categories. Current theories suggest that people should be especially inclined to accept generics that involve threatening information. However, previous tests of this claim have focused on generics about non-human categories, which raises the question of whether this effect applies as readily to human categories. In Experiment 1, adults were more likely to accept generics involving a threatening property for artifacts, but this negativity bias did not also apply to human categories. Experiment 2 (...)
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  12.  92
    Dreaming, Calculating, Thinking: Wittgenstein and Anti-Realism About the Past.William Child - 2007 - Philosophical Quarterly 57 (227):252–272.
    For the anti-realist, the truth about a subject's past thoughts and attitudes is determined by what he is subsequently disposed to judge about them. The argument for an anti-realist interpretation of Wittgenstein's view of past-tense statements seems plausible in three cases: dreams, calculating in the head, and thinking. Wittgenstein is indeed an anti-realist about dreaming. His account of calculating in the head suggests anti-realism about the past, but turns out to be essentially (...)
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  13.  17
    Please Mind the Gap: How To Podcast Your Brain.Karen Spaceinvaders - 2011 - Continent 1 (2):76-77.
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 76-77. Please click to listen to the mp3 files of deep brain recordings of individual brain cells, the smallest unit of the brain, in a whole, intact living brain. Each brain region’s cells possess an electrical signature. During recordings electrical signals are transformed into sound to facilitate auditory identification of cells during a process called “mapping.” Subthalamic nucleus by continent Cortex by continent Mapping is an important step in successfully identifying and localizing the appropriate target site in (...)
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  14. Meillassoux’s Virtual Future.Graham Harman - 2011 - Continent 1 (2):78-91.
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 78-91. This article consists of three parts. First, I will review the major themes of Quentin Meillassoux’s After Finitude . Since some of my readers will have read this book and others not, I will try to strike a balance between clear summary and fresh critique. Second, I discuss an unpublished book by Meillassoux unfamiliar to all readers of this article, except those scant few that may have gone digging in the microfilm archives of the École normale (...)
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  15.  68
    Pragmatism and Anti-Realism About the Past.Shaun O'Dwyer - 2010 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 46 (3):401-422.
    Around the beginning of the twentieth century, John Dewey began his struggle to pave a way out of the impasses generated by the contending schools of realism and idealism. In the early twenty-first century, claims have been made that his thought can also help philosophy move beyond the contemporary realism/anti-realism debate. Dewey scholar David Hildebrand asserts that John Dewey's philosophy provides "a defensible alternative to both realism and idealism" and to contemporary realism and anti-realism in the philosophy of history (Hildebrand (...)
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  16. Young Children's Reasoning About the Order of Past Events.Teresa McCormack & Christoph Hoerl - 2007 - Journal of Experimental Child Psychology 98 (3):168-183.
    Four studies are reported that employed an object location task to assess temporal–causal reasoning. In Experiments 1–3, successfully locating the object required a retrospective consideration of the order in which two events had occurred. In Experiment 1, 5- but not 4-year-olds were successful; 4-year-olds also failed to perform at above-chance levels in modified versions of the task in Experiments 2 and 3. However, in Experiment 4, 3-year-olds were successful when they were able to see the object being placed first in (...)
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  17. Justification, Realism and the Past.Christopher Peacocke - 2005 - Mind 114 (455):639-670.
    This paper begins by considering Dummett's justificationist treatment of statements about the past in his book Truth and the Past (2004). Contrary to Dummett's position, there is no way of applying the intuitionistic distinction in the arithmetical case between direct and indirect methods of establishing a content to the case of past-tense statements. Attempts to do so either give the wrong truth conditions, or rely on notions not available to a justificationist position. A better, (...)
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  18. Truth and the Past.Michael Dummett - 2003 - Cambridge University Press.
    Michael Dummett's three John Dewey Lectures--"The Concept of Truth," "Statements About the Past," and "The Metaphysics of Time"--were delivered at Columbia University in the spring of 2002. Revised and expanded, the lectures are presented here along with two new essays by Dummett, "Truth: Deniers and Defenders" and "The Indispensability of the Concept of Truth." In _Truth and the Past,_ Dummett clarifies his current positions on the metaphysical issue of realism and the philosophy of language. He is (...)
     
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  19.  13
    Systems of Iterated Projective Ordinal Notations and Combinatorial Statements About Binary Labeled Trees.L. Gordeev - 1989 - Archive for Mathematical Logic 29 (1):29-46.
    We introduce the appropriate iterated version of the system of ordinal notations from [G1] whose order type is the familiar Howard ordinal. As in [G1], our ordinal notations are partly inspired by the ideas from [P] where certain crucial properties of the traditional Munich' ordinal notations are isolated and used in the cut-elimination proofs. As compared to the corresponding “impredicative” Munich' ordinal notations (see e.g. [B1, B2, J, Sch1, Sch2, BSch]), our ordinal notations arearbitrary terms in the appropriate simple term (...)
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  20.  8
    Mitigating the Necessity of the Past in the Second Half of the Twelfth Century: Future-Dependent Predestination.Wojciech Wciórka - 2019 - Vivarium 58 (1-2):29-64.
    Early twelfth-century logicians invoked past-tensed statements with future-oriented contents to undermine the assumption that every proposition ‘about the past’ is determinate. In the second half of the century, the notion of future-dependence was used to restrict the scope of necessity per accidens. At some point, this idea began to be applied in theology to solve puzzles surrounding predestination, prescience, prophecy, and faith. In the mid-1160s, Magister Udo quotes some thinkers who insisted that the principle of the (...)
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  21. Should We Still Care About the Paradox of Fiction?R. Stecker - 2011 - British Journal of Aesthetics 51 (3):295-308.
    The paradox of fiction presents an inconsistent triad of propositions, all of which are purported to be plausible or difficult to abandon. Here is an instance of the paradox: (1) Sally pities Anna (where Anna is the character Anna Karenina). (2) To pity someone, one must believe that they exist and are suffering. (3) Sally does not believe that Anna exists. Here is the problem. The paradox was formulated during the heyday of the cognitive theory of the emotions when there (...)
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  22. Bringing About the Past.Michael Dummett - 1964 - Philosophical Review 73 (3):338-359.
  23.  37
    J. B. Paris. A Hierarchy of Cuts in Models of Arithmetic. Model Theory of Algebra and Arithmetic, Proceedings of the Conference on Applications of Logic to Algebra and Arithmetic Held at Karpacz, Poland, September 1–7, 1979, Edited by L. Pacholski, J. Wierzejewski, and A. J. Wilkie, Lecture Notes in Mathematics, Vol. 834, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, and New York, 1980, Pp. 312–337. - George Mills. A Tree Analysis of Unprovable Combinatorial Statements. Model Theory of Algebra and Arithmetic, Proceedings of the Conference on Applications of Logic to Algebra and Arithmetic Held at Karpacz, Poland, September 1–7, 1979, Pp. 248–311. - Jussi Ketonen and Robert Solovay. Rapidly Growing Ramsey Functions. Annals of Mathematics, Ser. 2 Vol. 113 , Pp. 267–314. [REVIEW]A. J. Wilkie - 1986 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 51 (4):1062-1066.
  24. Lmn-2 Interacts with Elf-2. On the Meaning of Common Statements in Biomedical Literature.Stefan Schulz & Ludger Jansen - 2006 - In KR-MED 2006 – Biomedical Ontology in Action. Proceedings of the 2nd International Workshop on Formal Knowledge Representation. MD. pp. 37-45.
    Statements about the behavior of biological entities, e.g. about the interaction between two proteins, abound in the literature on molecular biology and are increasingly becoming the targets of information extraction and text mining techniques. We show that an accurate analysis of the semantics of such statements reveals a number of ambiguities that is necessary to take into account in the practice of biomedical ontology engineering. Several concurring formalizations are proposed. Emphasis is laid on the discussion of (...)
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  25.  31
    The Medawar Lecture 2004 the Truth About Science.Peter Lipton - unknown
    The attitudes of scientists towards the philosophy of science is mixed and includes considerable indifference and some hostility. This may be due in part to unrealistic expectation and to misunderstanding. Philosophy is unlikely directly to improve scientific practices, but scientists may find the attempt to explain how science works and what it achieves of considerable interest nevertheless. The present state of the philosophy of science is illustrated by recent work on the ‘truth hypothesis’, according to which, science is generating increasingly (...)
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  26.  97
    Mad Speculation and Absolute Inhumanism: Lovecraft, Ligotti, and the Weirding of Philosophy.Ben Woodard - 2011 - Continent 1 (1):3-13.
    continent. 1.1 : 3-13. / 0/ – Introduction I want to propose, as a trajectory into the philosophically weird, an absurd theoretical claim and pursue it, or perhaps more accurately, construct it as I point to it, collecting the ground work behind me like the Perpetual Train from China Mieville's Iron Council which puts down track as it moves reclaiming it along the way. The strange trajectory is the following: Kant's critical philosophy and much of continental philosophy which has followed, (...)
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  27. On Identity Statements: In Defense of a Sui Generis View.Tristan Haze - 2016 - Disputatio 8 (43):269-293.
    This paper is about the meaning and function of identity statements involving proper names. There are two prominent views on this topic, according to which identity statements ascribe a relation: the object-view, on which identity statements ascribe a relation borne by all objects to themselves, and the name-view, on which an identity statement 'a is b' says that the names 'a' and 'b' codesignate. The object- and name-views may seem to exhaust the field. I make a (...)
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  28. Causal Decision Theory and the Fixity of the Past.Arif Ahmed - 2014 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 65 (4):665-685.
    Causal decision theory (CDT) cares only about the effects of a contemplated act, not its causes. The article constructs a case in which CDT consequently recommends a bet that the agent is certain to lose, rather than a bet that she is certain to win. CDT is plainly giving wrong advice in this case. It therefore stands refuted. 1 The Argument2 The Argument in More Detail2.1 The betting mechanism2.2 Soft determinism2.3 The content of P 2.4 The argument again3 The (...)
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  29. Realism, Decidability and the Past.Fabrice Pataut - 1996 - Dissertation, University of Southern California
    Realism is the claim that truth may transcend all possible verification. The familiar Dummettian argument against that modal claim is that there is no way to manifest an understanding of it in actual linguistic practice. The Dummettian anti-realist's provisional conclusion is that the modal claim must be false. ;The attack on truth-conditional semantics and on the principle of bivalence are familiar ingredients of the anti-realist negative programme. I agree that, whether mathematical formulae or ordinary sentences in the past tense (...)
     
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  30. The Truth About the Past and the Future.Ned Markosian - 2013 - In Fabrice Correia & Andrea Iacona (eds.), Around the Tree: Semantic and Metaphysical Issues Concerning Branching Time and the Open Future. Springer. pp. 127-141.
    This paper is about The Truthmaker Problem for Presentism. I spell out a solution to the problem that involves appealing to indeterministic laws of nature and branching semantics for past- and future-tensed sentences. Then I discuss a potential glitch for this solution, and propose a way to get around that glitch. Finally, I consider some likely objections to the view offered here, as well as replies to those objections.
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  31.  97
    Empirical Statements About the Absolute.Wesley C. Salmon - 1967 - Mind 76 (303):430-431.
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  32. Empirical Statements About the Absolute.Salmon Salmon - 1967 - Mind 76:430.
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  33. Kinship Past, Kinship Present: Bio-Essentialism in the Study of Kinship.Robert A. Wilson - 2016 - American Anthropologist 118 (3).
    In this article, I reconsider bio-essentialism in the study of kinship, centering on David Schneider’s influential critique that concluded that kinship was “a non-subject” (1972:51). Schneider’s critique is often taken to have shown the limitations of and problems with past views of kinship based on biology, genealogy, and reproduction, a critique that subsequently led those reworking kinship as relatedness in the new kinship studies to view their enterprise as divorced from such bio-essentialist studies. Beginning with an alternative narrative connecting (...)
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  34.  56
    The Origins of the Use of the Argument of Trivialization in the Twentieth Century.M. Andrés Bobenrieth - 2010 - History and Philosophy of Logic 31 (2):111-121.
    The origin of paraconsistent logic is closely related with the argument, 'from the assertion of two mutually contradictory statements any other statement can be deduced'; this can be referred to as ex contradictione sequitur quodlibet. Despite its medieval origin, only by the 1930s did it become the main reason for the unfeasibility of having contradictions in a deductive system. The purpose of this article is to study what happened earlier: from Principia Mathematica to that time, when it became well (...)
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  35. Cosmic Pessimism.Eugene Thacker - 2012 - Continent 2 (2):66-75.
    continent. 2.2 (2012): 66–75 ~*~ We’re Doomed. Pessimism is the night-side of thought, a melodrama of the futility of the brain, a poetry written in the graveyard of philosophy. Pessimism is a lyrical failure of philosophical thinking, each attempt at clear and coherent thought, sullen and submerged in the hidden joy of its own futility. The closest pessimism comes to philosophical argument is the droll and laconic “We’ll never make it,” or simply: “We’re doomed.” Every effort doomed to failure, every (...)
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  36. Abstract of "Antirealism, History and the Past".Fabrice Pataut - unknown
    According to the antirealist view of history, history is something historians construct in the present. Although the warrants they may gather in favour of past events do not form a coherent class, such warrants constitute the assertibility conditions of our statements about the past. They are by nature partial, gradual and defeasible. The antirealist is then faced with two problems. One is to account for a notion of historical significance, either in terms of causal links, broad (...)
     
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  37.  70
    Fatalism, Bivalence and the Past.Richard Gaskin - 1998 - Philosophical Quarterly 48 (190):83-88.
    In his paper ‘Some Comments on Fatalism’, The Philosophical Quartery, 46 (1996), pp. 1–11, James Cargile offers an argument against the view that the correct response to fatalism is to restrict the principle of bivalence with respect to statements about future contingencies. His argument fails because it is question‐begging. Further, he fails to give due weight to the reason behind this view, which is the desire to give an adequate account of the past/future asymmetry. He supposes that (...)
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  38.  11
    Rewording the Past: The Postwar Publication of a 1938 Lecture by Martin Heidegger.Sidonie Kellerer - 2014 - Modern Intellectual History 11 (3):575-602.
    In 1950 Martin Heidegger published his 1938 lecture “Die Zeit des Weltbildes” in the essay collectionHolzwege. He did so in order to document his “inner resistance” after the mid-1930s against the Nazi regime. This text has since been seen as evidence for Heidegger's early rejection of National Socialism and his refusal of a modern ideology that culminated in the totalitarian system. In spite of its influence, the published text has never been compared to the original lecture delivered in (...)
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  39. Being Emotional About the Past: On the Nature and Role of Past-Directed Emotions.Dorothea Debus - 2007 - Noûs 41 (4):758-779.
    We sometimes experience emotions which are directed at past events (or situations) which we witnessed at the time when they occurred (or obtained). The present paper explores the role which such "autobiographically past-directed emotions" (or "APD-emotions") play in a subject's mental life. A defender of the "Memory-Claim" holds that an APD-emotion is a memory, namely a memory of the emotion which the subject experienced at the time when the event originally occurred (or the situation obtained) towards which the (...)
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  40.  50
    Visions of Politics: Volume 2, Renaissance Virtues.Quentin Skinner - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    The first of three volumes of essays by Quentin Skinner, one of the world's leading intellectual historians. This collection includes some of his most important philosophical and methodological statements written over the past four decades, each carefully revised for publication in this form. In a series of seminal essays Professor Skinner sets forth the intellectual principles that inform his work. Writing as a practising historian, he considers the theoretical difficulties inherent in the pursuit of knowledge and interpretation, and (...)
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  41. Bringing About the Normative Past.Alessandra Tanesini - 2006 - American Philosophical Quarterly 43 (3):191-206.
  42.  35
    Introduction: Scientific History.Susanne Hoeber Rudolph & Robert B. Pippin - unknown
    In his inaugural lecture at Cambridge as Regius Professor of Modern History in 1895, Lord Acton urged that the historian deliver moral judgments on the figures of his research. Acton declaimed: I exhort you never to debase the moral currency or to lower the standard of rectitude, but to try others by the final maxim that governs your own lives and to suffer no man and no cause to escape the undying penalty which history has the power to inflict (...)
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  43. On Divine Foreknowledge and Bringing About the Past.Thomas B. Talbott - 1986 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 46 (3):455-469.
  44.  68
    On Blanket Statements About the Epistemic Effects of Religious Diversity.Andrew Koehl - 2005 - Religious Studies 41 (4):395-414.
    Religious diversity poses a challenge to the view that exclusive religious beliefs can be justified and warranted. Equally upright and thoughtful people who appear to possess similarly well-grounded and coherent systems of belief, come up with irreconcilable religious views. The content of religious beliefs also seems unduly dependent upon culture, and no one religion has been shown to be more transformative than the others. Philosophers have recently made at least three kinds of claims about the effects of diversity on (...)
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  45.  18
    Praying About the Past.Geoffrey Brown - 1985 - Philosophical Quarterly 35 (138):83-86.
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  46.  18
    Inaugural Lecture: Philosophy Enough.David Spurrett - 2009 - South African Journal of Philosophy 28 (1):43-64.
    This inaugural lecture was delivered at the Howard College Campus of UKZN on 2 April 2008. In it I do three things. First I sketch some arguments in favour of a naturalist conception of philosophy. The conclusions that I’m after are that philosophy is not an autonomous enterprise, so that it had better be continuous with scientific enquiry if it is to get anywhere. A supplementary claim I defend briefly is that the natural and social sciences should be viewed (...)
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  47.  14
    The Rejection of Fatalism About the Past.Gal Yehezkel - 2016 - Organon F: Medzinárodný Časopis Pre Analytickú Filozofiu 4 (23):525–538.
    In this paper I defend the rejection of fatalism about the past by showing that there are possible circumstances in which it would be rational to attempt to bring about by our decisions and actions a necessary and sufficient condition, other things being equal, for something which we see as favorable to have occurred in the past. The examples I put forward are analogous to our attempts to bring about the occurrence of future events, and (...)
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  48.  21
    Misconceptions About Colour Categories.Christoph Witzel - 2019 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 10 (3):499-540.
    The origin of colour categories and their relationship to colour perception have been the prime example for testing the influence of language on perception and thought and more generally for investigating the biological, ecological and cultural determination of human cognition. These themes are central to a broad range of disciplines, including vision research, neuroscience, cognitive psychology, developmental science, cultural anthropology, linguistics, computer science, and philosophy. Unfortunately, though, it has been tacitly taken for granted that the conceptual assumptions and methodological practices (...)
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  49. Statements About the Future.William Edward Morris - 1978 - Dissertation, University of Virginia
     
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  50.  8
    Adorno's Lesson Plans? : The Ethics of (Re)Education in "the Meaning of 'Working Through the Past'".Jaimey Fisher - 2010 - In Gerhard Richter (ed.), Language Without Soil: Adorno and Late Philosophical Modernity. Fordham University Press.
    This chapter refutes the long-standing prejudice that Theodor W. Adorno offered no concrete suggestions capable of bridging theory and praxis by scrutinizing the philosopher's contributions to Germany's educational reforms following World War II. The last lines of the introduction that Adorno added to “The Meaning of ‘Working through the Past’” when he gave the lecture again in 1962 suggest, like the original questions and answers to the lecture, that his mind was very much on the ethics suggested (...)
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