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Lee C. McIntyre [11]Lee Cameron Mcintyre [1]
  1. Readings in the Philosophy of Social Science.Michael Martin & Lee C. Mcintyre - 1994
  2.  46
    Accomodation, Prediction, and Confirmation.Lee C. McIntyre - 2001 - Perspectives on Science 9 (3):308-323.
    : In this paper I argue that belief in the greater confirmatory value of prediction over accommodation can best be understood as a function of the practice rather than the logic of science. Attempts to account for this asymmetry within the logic of science have revealed no non-arbitrary way to address the problem of underdetermination as it applies to prediction and thus have failed to account for the preference for prediction over accommodation on logical grounds. Instead, I propose a model (...)
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  3.  66
    Complexity and Social Scientific Laws.Lee C. McIntyre - 1993 - Synthese 97 (2):209 - 227.
    This essay defends the role of law-like explanation in the social sciences by showing that the "argument from complexity" fails to demonstrate a difference in kind between the subject matter of natural and social science. There are problems internal to the argument itself - stemming from reliance on an overly idealized view of natural scientific practice - and reason to think that, based upon an analogy with a more sophisticated understanding of natural science, which makes use of "redescriptions" in the (...)
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  4. Laws and Explanation in the Social Sciences Defending a Science of Human Behavior.Lee C. Mcintyre - 1996
  5.  26
    Taking Underdetermination Seriously.Lee C. McIntyre - 2003 - SATS 4 (1):59-72.
  6.  72
    Reduction, Supervenience, and the Autonomy of Social Scientific Laws.Lee C. McIntyre - 2000 - Theory and Decision 48 (2):101-122.
    Many have felt that it is impossible to defend autonomous laws of social science: where the regularities upheld are law-like it is argued that they are not at base social scientific, and where the phenomena to be explained would seem to require social descriptions, it is argued that laws governing the phenomena are unavailable at that level. But is it possible to develop an ontology that supports the dependence of the social on the physical, while nonetheless supporting the explanatory power (...)
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  7.  33
    Redescription and Descriptivism in the Social Sciences.Lee C. McIntyre - 2004 - Behavior and Philosophy 32 (2):453 - 464.
    In its quest to become more scientific, many have held that social science should more closely emulate the methodology of natural science. This has proven difficult and has led some to assert the impossibility of a science of human behavior. I maintain, however, that many critics of empirical social science have misunderstood the foundation for the success of the natural sciences, which is not that they have discovered the "true vocabulary of nature," but—on the contrary—that they have realized the benefits (...)
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  8.  29
    Editorial Introduction: Empiricism in the Philosophy of Social Science.Lee C. McIntyre - 1993 - Synthese 97 (2):159-159.
  9.  52
    Philosophy of Chemistry: Synthesis of a New Discipline.Davis Baird, Eric R. Scerri & Lee C. McIntyre (eds.) - 2006 - Springer.
    This comprehensive volume marks a new standard in scholarship in the still emerging field of the philosophy of chemistry. With selections drawn from a wide range of scholarly disciplines, philosophers, chemists, and historians of science here converge to ask some of the most fundamental questions about the relationship between philosophy and chemistry. What can chemistry teach us about longstanding disputes in the philosophy of science over such issues as reductionism, autonomy, and supervenience? And what new issues may chemistry bring to (...)
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  10.  20
    Dark Ages: The Case for a Science of Human Behavior.Lee C. McIntyre - 2006 - Bradford.
    During the Dark Ages, the progress of Western civilization virtually stopped. The knowledge gained by the scholars of the classical age was lost; for nearly 600 years, life was governed by superstitions and fears fueled by ignorance. In this outspoken and forthright book, Lee McIntyre argues that today we are in a new Dark Age--that we are as ignorant of the causes of human behavior as people centuries ago were of the causes of such natural phenomena as disease, famine, and (...)
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  11.  9
    Dark Ages: The Case for a Science of Human Behavior.Lee C. McIntyre - 2009 - Bradford.
    During the Dark Ages, the progress of Western civilization virtually stopped. The knowledge gained by the scholars of the classical age was lost; for nearly 600 years, life was governed by superstitions and fears fueled by ignorance. In this outspoken and forthright book, Lee McIntyre argues that today we are in a new Dark Age--that we are as ignorant of the causes of human behavior as people centuries ago were of the causes of such natural phenomena as disease, famine, and (...)
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