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  1.  27
    The Application of Animal Signaling Theory to Human Phenomena: Some Thoughts and Clarifications.Lee Cronk - 2005 - Social Science Information 44 (4):603-620.
    Animal signaling theory has recently become popular among anthropologists as a way to study human communication. One aspect of animal signaling theory, often known as costly signaling or handicap theory, has been used particularly often. This article makes four points regarding these developments: signaling theory is broader than existing studies may make it seem; costly signaling theory has roots in the social as well as the biological sciences; not all honest signals are costly and not all costs borne by signalers (...)
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  2.  8
    Preferential Parental Investment in Daughters Over Sons.Lee Cronk - 1991 - Human Nature 2 (4):387-417.
    Female-biased parental investment is unusual but not unknown in human societies. Relevant explanatory models include Fisher’s principle, the Trivers-Willard model, local mate and resource competition and enhancement, and economic rational actor models. Possible evidence of female-biased parental investment includes sex ratios, mortality rates, parents’ stated preferences for offspring of one sex, and direct and indirect measurements of actual parental behavior. Possible examples of female-biased parental investment include the Mukogodo of Kenya, the Ifalukese of Micronesia, the Cheyenne of North America, the (...)
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  3.  60
    Intelligent Design in Cultural Evolution.Lee Cronk - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):352-353.
    Intelligent design, though unnecessary in the study of biological evolution, is essential to the study of cultural evolution. However, the intelligent designers in question are not deities or aliens but rather humans going about their lives. The role of intentionality in cultural evolution can be elucidated through the addition of signaling theory to the framework outlined in the target article. (Published Online November 9 2006).
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  4.  46
    The Use of Moralistic Statements in Social Manipulation: A Reply to Roy A. Rappaport.Lee Cronk - 1994 - Zygon 29 (3):351-355.
  5.  9
    Intention Versus Behaviour in Parental Sex Preferences Among the Mukogodo of Kenya.Lee Cronk - 1991 - Journal of Biosocial Science 23 (2):229-240.
    The relationship between parents' stated sex preferences for children and actual parental behaviour towards sons and daughters is examined among the Mukogodo, a group of traditional pastoralists in rural Kenya. Although their cultural values are male-centred and they tend to express a preference for sons, Mukogodo parents actually appear to be more solicitous of daughters, and the Mukogodo have a strongly female-biased childhood sex ratio. Studies of stated sex preferences should therefore be coupled with attempts to assess actual parental investment (...)
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  6.  28
    Amounts Spent on Engagement Rings Reflect Aspects of Male and Female Mate Quality.Lee Cronk & Bria Dunham - 2007 - Human Nature 18 (4):329-333.
    Previous research has shown that the qualities of nuptial gifts among nonhumans and marriage-related property transfers in human societies such as bridewealth and dowry covary with aspects of mate quality. This article explores this issue for another type of marriage-related property transfer: engagement rings. We obtained data on engagement ring costs and other variables through a mail survey sent to recently married individuals living in the American Midwest. This article focuses on survey responses regarding rings that were purchased by men (...)
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  7.  27
    Group Selection's New Clothes.Lee Cronk - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):615-616.
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  8.  4
    “A Solidarity-Type World”: Need-Based Helping among Ranchers in the Southwestern United States.Lee Cronk, Diego Guevara Beltrán, Denise Laya Mercado & Athena Aktipis - 2021 - Human Nature 32 (2):482-508.
    To better understand risk management and mutual aid among American ranchers, we interviewed and mailed a survey to ranchers in Hidalgo County, New Mexico, and Cochise County, Arizona, focusing on two questions: When do ranchers expect repayment for the help they provide others? What determines ranchers’ degrees of involvement in networks of mutual aid, which they refer to as “neighboring”? When needs arise due to unpredictable events, such as injuries, most ranchers reported not expecting to be paid back for the (...)
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  9.  43
    Continuity, Displaced Reference, and Deception.Lee Cronk - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):510-511.
    Falk's contribution to a continuity theory of the origins of language would be complemented by an account of the origins of displaced reference, a key characteristic distinguishing human language from animal signaling systems. Because deception is one situation in which nonhumans may use signals in the absence of their referents, deception may have been the starting point for displaced reference.
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  10.  10
    Ethnographic Text Formation Processes.Lee Cronk - 1998 - Social Science Information 37 (2):321-349.
    Although the textualist critique of ethnography has challenged the possibility of science in cultural anthropology, insights provided by that critique are crucial for the further development of a scientific approach in the discipline. The value of the textualist critique of ethnography for the development of scientific ethnology can best be seen through an analogy with archaeology. Just as archaeologists' ability to reconstruct the past has been enhanced, not undermined, by a detailed understanding of archaeological site formation processes, so can ethnologists' (...)
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  11.  17
    Human History as Natural History.Lee Cronk - 1988 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 2 (1):103-110.
  12.  19
    Hypothesis Testing and Social Engineering.Lee Cronk - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (2):305-306.
  13.  8
    Identity Fusion and Fitness Interdependence.Lee Cronk & Athena Aktipis - 2018 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 41.
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  14.  8
    The Anthropology of Tyranny.Lee Cronk - 1986 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 1 (1):106-114.
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  15.  39
    Why Do We Need to Coordinate When Classifying Kin?Drew Gerkey & Lee Cronk - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (5):385-386.
    We suggest that there are two coordination games when it comes to understanding kin terminology. Jones' article focuses on the linguistic coordination inherent in developing meaningful kin terminologies, alluding briefly to the benefits of these kin terminologies for coordination in other domains. We enhance Jones' discussion by tracing the links between the structure of kin terminologies and their functions.
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  16.  16
    What is a Group? Conceptual Clarity Can Help Integrate Evolutionary and Social Scientific Research on Cooperation.Drew Gerkey & Lee Cronk - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (3):260-261.
    Smaldino argues that evolutionary theories of social behavior do not adequately explain the emergence of group-level traits, including differentiation of roles and organized interactions among individuals. We find Smaldino's account to be commendable but incomplete. Our commentary focuses on a simple question that has not been adequately addressed: What is a group?
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