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  1.  66
    Ethics of Bewilderment.Lee H. Yearley - 2010 - Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (3):436-460.
    An ethics of bewilderment, which differs dramatically from the more familiar ethics of ease, is best understood through poetic presentations. Using examples drawn from Chinese and Western sources—notably Du Fu and Dante—this inquiry treats bewilderment as both an emotion and a virtue. Both these forms of bewilderment involve an acknowledgment of how minimal is the ethical confidence we have, given the feelings we have and the judgments we must make, but they also extend in productive ways the implications of that (...)
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  2.  26
    Daoist Presentation and Persuasion Wandering Among Zhuangzi's Kinds of Language.Lee H. Yearley - 2005 - Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (3):503-535.
    A concern central to virtually all full-blooded instances of religious ethics is how persuasively to represent a world central to our fulfillment that far exceeds our normal understanding. The treatment of three kinds of language in an early Daoist text, the Zhuangzi, contains an especially profound discussion and expression of such persuasive presentations in religious ethics. This study examines it and concludes by viewing Dante's Commedia through the perspectives Zhuangzi's ideas and practices present.
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  3.  78
    Daoist Presentation and Persuasion: Wandering Among Zhuangzi's Kinds of Language.Lee H. Yearley - 2005 - Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (3):503 - 535.
    A concern central to virtually all full-blooded instances of religious ethics is how persuasively to represent a world central to our fulfillment that far exceeds our normal understanding. The treatment of three kinds of language in an early Daoist text, the Zhuangzi (Chuang Tzu), contains an especially profound discussion and expression of such persuasive presentations in religious ethics. This study examines it and concludes by viewing Dante's Commedia through the perspectives Zhuangzi's ideas and practices present.
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  4.  55
    Three Ways of Being Religious.Lee H. Yearley - 1982 - Philosophy East and West 32 (4):439-451.
  5. Theories, Virtues, and the Comparative Philosophy of Human Flourishings: A Response to Professor Allan.Lee H. Yearley - 1994 - Philosophy East and West 44 (4):711-720.
  6.  17
    Selves, Virtues, Odd Genres, and Alien Guides: An Approach to Religious Ethics.Lee H. Yearley - 1997 - Journal of Religious Ethics 25 (3):127 - 155.
    Complex tensions define us, and that is why rational evaluative analysis and the deliberate application of principles to cases can, at best, claim to account for only a limited register in the full compass of ethical voice. Close analysis of brief texts from the "Mencius" and Dante's "Inferno" discloses in both an approach to ethical reflection that aims to expand the capacity for virtue, the ethical skillfulness exercised in response and evaluation, through affective engagement of the reader. This approach, a (...)
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  7. The Ideas of Newman: Christianity and Human Religiosity.Lee H. Yearley - 1979 - Religious Studies 15 (4):568-570.
     
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  8. The Nature-Grace Question in the Context of Fortitude.Lee H. Yearley - 1971 - The Thomist 35 (4):557-580.
     
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  9.  67
    Confucianism and Christianity: A Comparative Study.Lee H. Yearley - 1979 - Philosophy East and West 29 (4):509-512.
  10.  14
    The Role and Pursuit of the Virtue of Equanimity in Ancient China and Greece.Lee H. Yearley - 2015 - In R. A. H. King (ed.), The Good Life and Conceptions of Life in Early China and Graeco-Roman Antiquity. De Gruyter. pp. 363-386.
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  11.  24
    Review: The Author Replies [to Nussbaum, Van Norden, and Jenkins]. [REVIEW]Lee H. Yearley - 1993 - Journal of Religious Ethics 21 (2):385 - 395.
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  12.  59
    The Ascetic Grounds of Goodness: William James's Case for the Virtue of Voluntary Poverty.Lee H. Yearley - 1998 - Journal of Religious Ethics 26 (1):105-135.
    William James, concerned with the issue of the applicability of traditional religious virtues to modern society, argues for the significance of ascetic virtues in general and voluntary poverty in particular, not least because of their contribution to the actualization of benevolence. Examining and evaluating his account uncovers the ways in which James is a virtue theorist, some distinctive characteristics of religious virtues, and both the possibilities and difficulties in any modern defense of a traditional virtue that appears as odd as (...)
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  13. Virtues and Religious Virtues in the Confucian Tradition.Lee H. Yearley - 2003 - In Weiming Tu & Mary Evelyn Tucker (eds.), Confucian Spirituality. Crossroad Pub. Company. pp. 1--134.
     
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  14.  5
    Two Strands of Confucianism.Lee H. Yearley - 2009 - In Tracy B. Strong & Richard Madsen (eds.), The Many and the One: Religious and Secular Perspectives on Ethical Pluralism in the Modern World. Princeton University Press. pp. 154-158.
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  15.  11
    Chapter 10. Conflicts Among Ideals of Human Flourishing.Lee H. Yearley - 1992 - In John P. Reeder & Gene Outka (eds.), Prospects for a Common Morality. Princeton University Press. pp. 233-253.
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