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  1. Human Inference: Strategies and Shortcomings of Social Judgment.Richard E. Nisbett & Lee Ross - 1980 - Prentice-Hall.
  2.  2
    Human Inference: Strategies and Shortcomings of Social Judgment.Christopher Cherniak, Richard Nisbett & Lee Ross - 1983 - Philosophical Review 92 (3):462.
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    Objectivity in the Eye of the Beholder: Divergent Perceptions of Bias in Self Versus Others.Emily Pronin, Thomas Gilovich & Lee Ross - 2004 - Psychological Review 111 (3):781-799.
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    Reflections on Biased Assimilation and Belief Polarization.Lee Ross - 2012 - Critical Review 24 (2):233-245.
    Where Taber and Lodge view belief polarization to indicate a ?partisan motivation,? Lord et al. (1979) believed it to be consistent with a desire for accuracy: A ?weak? study articulating an opposing viewpoint might simply sharpen participants' initial belief of the wisdom of their prior beliefs. This polarization, Taber and Lodge show, correlates with political sophistication: The more partisan a participant, the more time spent reading the opinions of the other side?in order to critically refute them. Taber and Lodge attribute (...)
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  5. Shortcomings in the Attribution Process: On the Origins and Maintenance of Erroneous Social Assessments.Lee Ross & Craig A. Anderson - 1982 - In Daniel Kahneman, Paul Slovic & Amos Tversky (eds.), Judgment Under Uncertainty: Heuristics and Biases. Cambridge University Press. pp. 129--152.
     
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    Reflections On Biased Assimilation And Belief Polarization.Lee Ross - 2012 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 24 (2):233-245.
    Where Taber and Lodge view belief polarization to indicate a “partisan motivation,” Lord et al. believed it to be consistent with a desire for accuracy: A “weak” study articulating an opposing viewpoint might simply sharpen participants' initial belief of the wisdom of their prior beliefs. This polarization, Taber and Lodge show, correlates with political sophistication: The more partisan a participant, the more time spent reading the opinions of the other side—in order to critically refute them. Taber and Lodge attribute such (...)
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    Barriers to Dispute Resolution.Byron Bland, Brenna Powell & Lee Ross - 2012 - In Ryan Goodman, Derek Jinks & Andrew K. Woods (eds.), Understanding Social Action, Promoting Human Rights. Oup Usa. pp. 265.
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  8. What Kinds of Conservatives Does Social Psychology Lack, and Why?Lee Ross - 2015 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38.
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