Search results for 'Legal polycentricity Language' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  31
    V. K. Bhatia, Christopher Candlin & Paola Evangelisti Allori (eds.) (2008). Language, Culture and the Law: The Formulation of Legal Concepts Across Systems and Cultures. Peter Lang.
    The volume presents a set of invited papers based on analyses of legal discourse drawn from a number of international contexts where often the English language ...
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  2.  40
    Despina Dokoupilova (2013). Creating Legal Subjectivity Through Language and the Uses of the Legal Emblem: Children of Law and the Parenthood of the State. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 26 (2):315-339.
    This paper constitutes a critical exploration of the functional features underpinning the unconscious of institutional attachment—namely an attachment which is understood in terms of the subject-infant’s love for his institutional parent-power holder, and the indefinite need for a subject to remain within its infantile condition under the parenthood of the State. We venture beyond the Paternal metaphor and move towards the neglected metaphor of the Mother, so focal in the individual process of identification, assumption of language and the permanent (...)
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  3.  12
    Lucia Morra (2010). New Models for Language Understanding and the Cognitive Approach to Legal Metaphors. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 23 (4):387-405.
    The essay deals with the mechanism of interpretation for legal metaphorical expressions. Firstly, it points out the perspective the cognitive approach induced about legal metaphors; then it suggests that this perspective gains in plausibility when a new bilateral model of language understanding is endorsed. A possible sketch of the meaning-making procedure for legal metaphors, compatible with this new model, is then proposed, and illustrated with some examples built on concepts belonging to the Italian Civil Code. The (...)
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  4.  12
    Massimo Leone (2013). Intracultural Awareness in Legal Language—Silvio Berlusconi's Iconography of Law. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 26 (3):579-595.
    Against the assumption that legal and normative systems are coextensive with geopolitical units and national spaces, the article advocates for the need to study how different legal and normative semiospheres, within the same geopolitical unit and national space, often give rise to ‘normolects’ that are transversal to socio-economic classes, ethnicities, and cultural lifestyles. The concept of legal and normative ‘imaginaries’ is useful to come to terms with the legal and normative semiotic ideology of such normolects, including (...)
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  5. Brian Bix (1993). Law, Language, and Legal Determinacy. Oxford University Press.
    This book discusses one of the central problems in the philosophy of law--the question of legal determinacy. Is the law a seamless web or are there gaps? Bix argues that the major re-thinking of the common and "common sense" views about law that have been proposed by various recent legal theories is unnecessary. He offers a reconsideration of the role of language in the law, and the way ideas about language have been used and misused in (...)
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  6.  6
    Sol Azuelos-Atias (2011). On the Incoherence of Legal Language to the General Public. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 24 (1):41-59.
    I will suggest, in this article, a possible explanation of the fact that legal language appears incoherent to the general public. I will present one legal text (an indictment), explaining why it appears incoherent to legal laypersons. I will argue that the traits making this particular text appear incoherent are, first, that a specialized legal meaning is conveyed implicitly and, second, that there are no key-words that could direct laypersons to the knowledge making this meaning (...)
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  7.  3
    Leïla Choukroune (2016). The Language of Rights and the Politics of Law: Perspectives on China’s Last Legal Ditch Struggle. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 29 (4):779-803.
    Since Xi Jinping has taken office in 2012, China’s political repression has only but intensified so that the regime is definitively turning away from the 1990s legal reforms and the many expectations that followed in terms of rule of law and other rights fostering. In replacing these recent developments in a larger perspective including that of a “socialist harmonious society”, which had already shaded a particular light on Chinese reforms, this article proposes to envisage contemporary Chinese legal culture (...)
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  8. Andrei Marmor (2008). The Pragmatics of Legal Language. Ratio Juris 21 (4):423-452.
    The purpose of this essay is to explore some of the main pragmatic aspects of communication within the legal context. It will be argued that in some crucial respects, the pragmatics of legal language is unique, involving considerations that are not typically present in ordinary conversational contexts. In particular, certain normative considerations that are typically settled in a regular conversational context are unresolved and potentially contentious in the legal case. On the other hand, the essay also (...)
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  9. Duarte D'Almeida Luís (2011). Legal Statements and Normative Language. Law and Philosophy 30 (2):167-199.
    Can there be a non-reductivist, source-based explanation of the use of normative language in statements describing the law and legal situations? This problem was formulated by Joseph Raz, who also claimed to have solved it. According to his well-known doctrine of ‘detached’ statements, normative legal statements can be informatively made by speakers who merely adopt, without necessarily sharing, the point of view of someone who accepts that legal norms are justified and ought to be followed. In (...)
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  10.  8
    Manfred Spieker (2014). The Legal Language of the Culture of Death in Europe. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 14 (4):647-657.
    By its central terms, the language of the culture of death sends signals that produce life-accepting associations and at the same time mask its intentions against life. On the one hand, the culture of death includes certain behaviors. On the other hand, it includes those social and legal structures that strive to make killing socially acceptable by camouflaging it as a medical service or a social assistance. The culture of death wants to remove killing from condemnation, so that (...)
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  11.  6
    Hubert Lehmann (1990). Legal Concepts in a Natural Language Based Expert System. Ratio Juris 3 (2):245-253.
    . A new approach to the formalization of concepts used in legal reasoning such as obligation and cause is presented. The formalization is based on the linguistic use of the concepts both in legal language and in ordinary language, and has been motivated by work on a legal expert system with a natural language interface. Particularly for the concept of obligation this yields quite different results from those obtained by the usual approach of deontic (...)
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  12.  1
    Siobhan Weare (forthcoming). Bad, Mad or Sad? Legal Language, Narratives, and Identity Constructions of Women Who Kill Their Children in England and Wales. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique:1-22.
    In this article I explore the ways in which legal language, discourses, and narratives construct new dominant identities for women who kill their children. These identities are those of the ‘bad’, ‘mad’, or ‘sad’ woman. Drawing upon and critiquing statutes, case law, and sentencing remarks from England and Wales, I explore how singular narrative identities emerge for the female defendants concerned. Using examples from selected cases, I highlight how the judiciary interpret legislation, use evidence, and draw upon gender (...)
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  13.  2
    Maksymilian T. Madelr, System Values and Understanding Legal Language.
    This paper argues that the concerns and methodology of the recently completed Report of the International Law Commission (ILC) over the fragmentation of international law presuppose a particular way of understanding legal language which tends to separate the understanding of rules from their factual adaptability to certain recurring social problems faced within specific institutional contexts. The paper argues that separating rules from their factual adaptability focuses the analysis on surface coherence - coherence at the level of abstract terms (...)
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  14. Hector MacQueen (2015). Joanna Kopaczyk: The Legal Language of Scottish Burghs: Standardization and Lexical Bundles 1380-1560, 2013. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 28 (4):875-878.
    One of the most striking experiences of my early days as a postgraduate student of medieval Scots law was an encounter with a twelfth-century charter which, apart from being written in Latin, might have served as a model or template for the land transfer documents which I had learned how to draft the previous year in the undergraduate class called Conveyancing. Alliterative thoughts came into my head—conveyancing, conservatism, consistency, continuity—but also the question of when this seeming stability was first achieved, (...)
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  15.  42
    Georg Lohmann (2013). As Definições Teóricas de Direitos Humanos de Jürgen Habermas: O Princípio Legal E as Correções Morais[Ign] [Title Language="En"]The Theoretical Definitions of Human Rights of Jürgen Habermas[Ign]: [Subtitle]Legal Principle and Moral Corrections. Trans/Form/Ação 36 (SPE):87-102.
    No entendimento de Habermas, "direito", na expressão "direitos humanos", é um conceito jurídico, donde direitos humanos, para ele, serem direitos jurídicos, normas legais declaradas em atos de fundações do Estado ou anunciadas em convenções do direito internacional e/ou constituições estatais. Ao conceber assim os direitos e tematizar os direitos humanos numa abordagem tríplice (focando-os entre moral, direito e política), ele fornece diferentes definições teóricas dos direitos humanos. O texto apresenta uma exposição sistemática dessas definições e focaliza os diferentes problemas que (...)
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  16. Heikki Mattila (2005). The History of Legal Language. In Alex Barber (ed.), Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics. Elsevier.
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  17.  28
    L. Morawski (1999). Law, Fact and Legal Language. Law and Philosophy 18 (5):461-473.
    This paper discusses the difference between the factual and the legal, both as to terms and as to statements, on the analogy of the methodologists' distinction of the observational and the theoretical. No absolute distinction exists, and pure `brute facts' do not exist in law because of the socialisation of physical world and juridification of the social world.; also, the effect of evidentiary constraints. Law/fact distinction depends on `applicability rules'. The problem of `mixed terms' is partly a matter of (...)
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  18.  1
    Jaakko Husa (forthcoming). Translating Legal Language and Comparative Law. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique:1-12.
    Legal texts are in the focus of both lawyers and translators. This paper discusses the binary opposition of these two views especially in the light of contract law. There is one crucial epistemic difference between the point of view of the translator and the lawyer when it comes to the interpretation of legal texts. In the translator’s view legal text is traditionally conceived as static as to its nature; something that already exists in the form of text. (...)
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  19.  10
    Peter Goodrich (1984). Rhetoric as Jurisprudence: An Introduction to the Politics of Legal Language. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 4 (1):88-122.
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  20. Robert P. Charrow, Jo Ann Crandall & Veda R. Charrow (1982). Chapter 6. Characteristics and Functions of Legal Language. In John Lehrberger & Richard Kittredge (eds.), Sublanguage: Studies of Language in Restricted Semantic Domains. De Gruyter. pp. 175-190.
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  21. Karen Petroski (2015). Legal Fictions and the Limits of Legal Language. In William Twining & Maksymilian Del Mar (eds.), Legal Fictions in Theory and Practice. Springer Verlag.
     
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  22. Austin Sarat (ed.) (2016). Rhetorical Processes and Legal Judgments: How Language and Arguments Shape Struggles for Rights and Power. Cambridge University Press.
    Over the last several decades legal scholars have plumbed law's rhetorical life. Scholars have done so under various rubrics, with law and literature being among the most fruitful venues for the exploration of law's rhetoric and the way rhetoric shapes law. Today, new approaches are shaping this exploration. Among the most important of these approaches is the turn toward history and toward what might be called an 'embedded' analysis of rhetoric in law. Historical and embedded approaches locate that analysis (...)
     
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  23.  60
    Jerzy Wróblewski (1985). Legal Language and Legal Interpretation. Law and Philosophy 4 (2):239 - 255.
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  24.  7
    Alissa J. Hartig (2016). Intersections Between Law and Language: Disciplinary Concepts in Second Language Legal Literacy. Studies in Logic, Grammar and Rhetoric 45 (1):69-86.
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  25.  1
    Anne Wagner (2002). Introduction: The (Ab)Use of Language in Legal Discourse. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 15 (4):323-324.
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  26.  8
    Rafael Hernández Marín (1991). Practical Logic and the Analysis of Legal Language. Ratio Juris 4 (3):322-333.
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  27.  55
    John Hund (1995). Brian Bix: Law, Language and Legal Determinacy. Mind 104 (416):885-889.
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  28. Karl Olivecrona (1962). Legal Language and Reality. In Ralph Abraham Newman (ed.), Essays in Jurisprudence in Honor of Roscoe Pound. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill. pp. 151--91.
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  29. Anne Wagner (2003). Translation of the Language of the Common Law Into Legal French: Myth or Reality. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 16 (2):177-193.
    Translating (and so construinga specialized source text) means producing afunctional text in a linguaculture target textthat is needed for specific communicativepurposes by processing the information given ina previous text in a different linguaculturesource text. Consequently, the comparison oflegal texts and terms from English to Frenchinevitably involves a theory of equivalence –if ever possible. The aim of this article is toreview the various hindrances or pitfalls inlegal translation and also a possible theory ofhow to avoid misunderstandings between thesource and the target (...)
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  30.  4
    Rick Iedema (1995). Legal Ideology: The Role of Language in Common Law Appellate Judgments. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 8 (1):21-36.
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  31.  2
    Peter Ingram (1988). Implicature in Legal Language. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 1 (1):51-70.
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  32.  25
    Viktor Knapp (1991). Some Problems of Legal Language. Ratio Juris 4 (1):1-17.
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  33. Jerzy Wr�Blewski (1989). Proof in Law: Legal Language and Legal Institutions. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 2 (1):3-16.
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  34.  20
    James B. Brady (1972). Law, Language and Logic: The Legal Philosophy of Wesley Newcomb Hohfeld. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 8 (4):246 - 263.
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  35.  3
    Anthony Beck (1989). Legal Language and Legal Institutions, a Response to Jerzy Wr�Blewski. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 2 (1):17-28.
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  36.  3
    Joan Holland (1998). J. R. Schwyter, Old English Legal Language: The Lexical Field of Theft. (North-Western European Language Evolution, Supplement 15.) Odense: Odense University Press, 1996. Paper. Pp. Iv, 197; Black-and-White Figures and Tables. DKr 225. [REVIEW] Speculum 73 (2):593-595.
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  37.  3
    Alf Ross (1958). Definition in Legal Language. Logique Et Analyse 1 (1):139-149.
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  38.  2
    Matthew Holford (2015). Joanna Kopaczyk, The Legal Language of Scottish Burghs: Standardization and Lexical Bundles . Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2013. Pp. Xviii, 337; 15 Black-and-White Figures. $74. ISBN: 978-0-19-9945-15-3. [REVIEW] Speculum 90 (1):268-269.
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  39.  1
    Frank Nuessel (2016). The Consequences and Effects of Language Transformations in Legal Discourse. Semiotica 2016 (209):125-148.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Semiotica Jahrgang: 2016 Heft: 209 Seiten: 125-148.
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  40.  1
    Pi-Chan Hu & Jian Li (2016). An Exploration of the Semantic Domain of Legal Language. Semiotica 2016 (209):187-208.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Semiotica Jahrgang: 2016 Heft: 209 Seiten: 187-208.
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  41.  2
    Bozena Tieszen & Heather Pantoga (2006). Gender-Based Miscommunication in Legal Discourse and its Impact on the Clarity of Legal Language. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 19 (1):69-80.
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  42.  3
    R. Henle (1994). Law, Language, and Legal Determinacy. By Brian Bix . 221 Pp. [REVIEW] American Journal of Jurisprudence 39 (1):493-497.
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  43.  2
    A. Robinson (1960). Review: Alf Ross, Definition in Legal Language. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 25 (1):90-91.
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  44.  1
    Lynn Kaye (2015). Fixity and Time in Talmudic Law and Legal Language. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 23 (2):127-160.
    _ Source: _Volume 23, Issue 2, pp 127 - 160 This article illuminates rabbinic concepts of temporality through examining metaphorical uses of the root qbʿ. The root has both concrete and metaphorical meanings, describing the physical attachment of objects as well as temporal ideas of permanence, stability, and endurance. While it has been argued that rabbinic texts do not display concepts of time in the modern sense, a combination of philological and conceptual analysis shows how rabbinic images of temporal themes (...)
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  45.  1
    Colin D. Robertson (2010). Vijay K. Bhatia, Christopher N. Candlin and Paola Evangelisti Allori (Eds.): Language, Culture and the Law: The Formulation of Legal Concepts Across Systems and Cultures, Volume 64, Linguistic Insights. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 23 (4):509-514.
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  46.  1
    G. J. Dalcourt (1995). Finnis and Legal Language and Reasoning. American Journal of Jurisprudence 40 (1):49-69.
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  47.  2
    Kerry Breen (2012). Mandatory Reporting: Watch Your (Legal) Language. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (1):117-118.
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  48. J. W. Harris (1980). Olivecrona on Law and Language the Search for Legal Culture.
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  49. Joan Holland (1998). Old English Legal Language: The Lexical Field of Theft.J. R. Schwyter. Speculum 73 (2):593-595.
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  50. E. Hopkins (1925). Words of Defamation in Sanskrit Legal Language. Journal of the American Oriental Society 45:39-50.
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