Results for 'Lenora Hanson'

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  1.  9
    Allégorie des multitudes, ou William Blake comme économe défaillant.Lenora Hanson - 2013 - Multitudes 55 (4):94.
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  2. Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science in Memory of Norwood Russell Hanson Proceedings of the Boston Colloquium for the Philosophy of Science, 1964-1966.Norwood Russell Hanson, R. S. Cohen & Marx W. Wartofsky - 1967
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  3.  21
    The Hanson-Hughes Debate on “The Crack of a Future Dawn.”.Robin Hanson - 2007 - Journal of Evolution and Technology 16 (1):99-126.
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  4.  1
    Hanson's Gambling Save Science?: Reply.Robin Hanson - 1995 - Social Epistemology 9 (1):45-45.
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  5.  10
    Hippocrates. On Head Wounds. Edited and Translated with Commentaries by, Maury Hanson. 130 Pp., Bibl., Index. Berlin: Akademie Verlag, 1999. [REVIEW]Ann Ellis Hanson - 2002 - Isis 93 (4):685-686.
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  6. In Memory of Norwood Russell Hanson Proceedings of the Boston Colloquium for the Philosophy of Science, 1964-1966.R. S. Cohen, Norwood Russell Hanson & Marx W. Wartofsky - 1967 - Reidel.
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  7. Beyond the Edge of Certainty Essays in Contemporary Science and Philosophy [by] Norwood Russell Hanson [and Others]. --.Robert Garland Colodny & Norwood Russell Hanson - 1965 - Prentice-Hall.
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  8. Patterns of Discovery: An Inquiry Into the Conceptual Foundations of Science.Norwood Russell Hanson - 1958 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this 1958 book, Professor Hanson turns to an equally important but comparatively neglected subject, the philosophical aspects of research and discovery.
  9. Patterns of Discovery an Inquiry Into the Conceptual Foundations of Science.Norwood Russell Hanson - 1958 - Cambridge University Press.
    Philosophers of science have given considerable attention to the logic of completed scientific systems. In this 1958 book, Professor Hanson turns to an equally important but comparatively neglected subject, the philosophical aspects of research and discovery. He shows that there is a logical pattern in finding theories as much as in using established theories to make deductions and predictions, and he sets out the features of this pattern with the help of striking examples in the history of science.
     
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  10.  35
    Kierkegaard and the Life of Faith: The Aesthetic, the Ethical, and the Religious in Fear and Trembling.Jeffrey A. Hanson - 2017 - Indiana University Press.
    Soren Kierkegaard's Fear and Trembling is one of the most widely read works of Continental philosophy and the philosophy of religion. While several commentaries and critical editions exist, Jeffrey Hanson offers a distinctive approach to this crucial text. Hanson gives equal weight and attention to all three of Kierkegaard’s "problems," dealing with Fear and Trembling as part of the entire corpus of Kierkegaard's production and putting all parts into relation with each other. Additionally, he offers a distinctive analysis (...)
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  11.  53
    Logical Truth in Modal Languages: Reply to Nelson and Zalta. [REVIEW]William H. Hanson - 2014 - Philosophical Studies 167 (2):327-339.
    Does general validity or real world validity better represent the intuitive notion of logical truth for sentential modal languages with an actuality connective? In (Philosophical Studies 130:436–459, 2006) I argued in favor of general validity, and I criticized the arguments of Zalta (Journal of Philosophy 85:57–74, 1988) for real world validity. But in Nelson and Zalta (Philosophical Studies 157:153–162, 2012) Michael Nelson and Edward Zalta criticize my arguments and claim to have established the superiority of real world validity. Section 1 (...)
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  12.  22
    Foundational Issues in Human Brain Mapping.Stephen José Hanson & Martin Bunzl (eds.) - 2010 - Bradford.
    The field of neuroimaging has reached a watershed. Brain imaging research has been the source of many advances in cognitive neuroscience and cognitive science over the last decade, but recent critiques and emerging trends are raising foundational issues of methodology, measurement, and theory. Indeed, concerns over interpretation of brain maps have created serious controversies in social neuroscience, and, more important, point to a larger set of issues that lie at the heart of the entire brain mapping enterprise. In this volume, (...)
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  13. The Concept of the Positron: A Philosophical Analysis.Norwood Russell Hanson - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    Originally published in 1963, The Concept of the Positron forms a detailed analysis of quantum theory. Whilst it is not as well known as Professor Hanson's previous book, Patterns of Discovery, the text has many interesting aspects. In many ways it goes further than Hanson's earlier work in approaching the problems of theory competition and the rationality of science, topics that have since become central to the philosophy of science. It is also notable for a rigorous and forthright (...)
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  14.  51
    Combinatorial Information Market Design.Robin Hanson - unknown
    Department of Economics, George Mason University, MSN 1D3, Carow Hall, Fairfax VA 22030, USA E-mail: rhanson@gmu.edu (http://hanson.gmu.edu).
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  15.  16
    Reply to Comments on Could Gambling Save Science?Robin Hanson - unknown
    Arthur Diamond comments that "it is not clear how a donor distributes money through Hanson's market". Let me try again to be clear. Imagine David Levy were to seek funding for the regression he suggests in his comments, on the relative impact of sports versus science spending on aggregate productivity. Consider what might happen under three different funding institutions.
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  16.  3
    Perception and Discovery: An Introduction to Scientific Inquiry.Norwood Russell Hanson - 2018 - Springer Verlag.
    We have been discussing some of the fundamental features of the classical calculus of probability. The equiprobability of rival events was seen to be a major assumption of the calculus. Moreover, it is an assumption which the pure mathematician need not bother to justify. He need only present his formal system as follows.
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  17. Patterns of Discovery.Norwood R. Hanson, A. D. Ritchie & Henryk Mehlberg - 1960 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 10 (40):346-349.
     
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  18. Long-Term Trajectories of Human Civilization.Seth D. Baum, Stuart Armstrong, Timoteus Ekenstedt, Olle Häggström, Robin Hanson, Karin Kuhlemann, Matthijs M. Maas, James D. Miller, Markus Salmela, Anders Sandberg, Kaj Sotala, Phil Torres, Alexey Turchin & Roman V. Yampolskiy - 2019 - Foresight 21 (1):53-83.
    Purpose This paper aims to formalize long-term trajectories of human civilization as a scientific and ethical field of study. The long-term trajectory of human civilization can be defined as the path that human civilization takes during the entire future time period in which human civilization could continue to exist. -/- Design/methodology/approach This paper focuses on four types of trajectories: status quo trajectories, in which human civilization persists in a state broadly similar to its current state into the distant future; catastrophe (...)
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  19.  12
    Perception and Discovery.Norwood Russell Hanson - 1969 - San Francisco, Freeman, Cooper.
  20. Moral Realism, Aesthetic Realism, and the Asymmetry Claim.Louise Hanson - 2018 - Ethics 129 (1):39-69.
    Many people accept, at least implicitly, what I call the asymmetry claim: the view that moral realism is more defensible than aesthetic realism. This article challenges the asymmetry claim. I argue that it is surprisingly hard to find points of contrast between the two domains that could justify their very different treatment with respect to realism. I consider five potentially promising ways to do this, and I argue that all of them fail. If I am right, those who accept the (...)
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  21. Perception and Discovery an Introduction to Scientific Inquiry.Norwood Russell Hanson - 1969 - Freeman, Cooper.
     
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  22. The Real Problem with Evolutionary Debunking Arguments.Louise Hanson - 2017 - Philosophical Quarterly 67 (268):508-33.
    There is a substantial literature on evolutionary debunking arguments (EDAs) in metaethics. According to these arguments, evolutionary explanations of our moral beliefs pose a significant problem for moral realism, specifically by committing the realist to an unattractive pessimism about the prospects of our having moral knowledge. In this paper, I argue that EDAs exploit an equivocation between two distinct readings of their central claim. One is plausibly true but has no epistemic relevance, and the other would have epistemic consequences for (...)
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  23.  25
    What Connectionist Models Learn: Learning and Representation in Connectionist Networks.Stephen José Hanson & David J. Burr - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (3):471-489.
    Connectionist models provide a promising alternative to the traditional computational approach that has for several decades dominated cognitive science and artificial intelligence, although the nature of connectionist models and their relation to symbol processing remains controversial. Connectionist models can be characterized by three general computational features: distinct layers of interconnected units, recursive rules for updating the strengths of the connections during learning, and “simple” homogeneous computing elements. Using just these three features one can construct surprisingly elegant and powerful models of (...)
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  24. Actuality, Necessity, and Logical Truth.William H. Hanson - 2006 - Philosophical Studies 130 (3):437-459.
    The traditional view that all logical truths are metaphysically necessary has come under attack in recent years. The contrary claim is prominent in David Kaplan’s work on demonstratives, and Edward Zalta has argued that logical truths that are not necessary appear in modal languages supplemented only with some device for making reference to the actual world (and thus independently of whether demonstratives like ‘I’, ‘here’, and ‘now’ are present). If this latter claim can be sustained, it strikes close to the (...)
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  25.  96
    The Concept of Logical Consequence.William H. Hanson - 1997 - Philosophical Review 106 (3):365-409.
    In the first section, I consider what several logicians say informally about the notion of logical consequence. There is significant variation among these accounts, they are sometimes poorly explained, and some of them are clearly at odds with the usual technical definition. In the second section, I first argue that a certain kind of informal account—one that includes elements of necessity, generality, and apriority—is approximately correct. Next I refine this account and consider several important questions about it, including the appropriate (...)
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  26.  25
    Regulation During Challenge: A General Model of Learned Performance Under Schedule Constraint.Stephen J. Hanson & William Timberlake - 1983 - Psychological Review 90 (3):261-282.
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  27.  30
    Two Dogmas of the Artistic-Ethical Interaction Debate.Louise Hanson - forthcoming - Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-14.
    Can artworks be morally good or bad? Many philosophers have thought so. Does this moral goodness or badness bear on how good or bad a work is as art? This is very much a live debate. Autonomists argue that moral value is not relevant to artistic value; interactionists argue that it is. In this paper, I argue that the debate between interactionists and autonomists has been conducted unfairly: all parties to the debate have tacitly accepted a set of constraints which (...)
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  28. Reverse Inference in Neuropsychology.Clark Glymour & Catherine Hanson - 2016 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 67 (4):1139-1153.
    Reverse inference in cognitive neuropsychology has been characterized as inference to ‘psychological processes’ from ‘patterns of activation’ revealed by functional magnetic resonance or other scanning techniques. Several arguments have been provided against the possibility. Focusing on Machery’s presentation, we attempt to clarify the issues, rebut the impossibility arguments, and propose and illustrate a strategy for reverse inference. 1 The Problem of Reverse Inference in Cognitive Neuropsychology2 The Arguments2.1 The anti-Bayesian argument3 Patterns of Activation4 Reverse Inference Practiced5 Seek and Ye Shall (...)
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  29. Perception and Discovery.Norwood Russell Hanson - 1972 - Synthese 25 (1):241-247.
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  30.  9
    The Concept of Logical Consequence.William H. Hanson - 1997 - Philosophical Review 106 (3):365-409.
    In the first section, I consider what several logicians say informally about the notion of logical consequence. There is significant variation among these accounts, they are sometimes poorly explained, and some of them are clearly at odds with the usual technical definition. In the second section, I first argue that a certain kind of informal account—one that includes elements of necessity, generality, and apriority—is approximately correct. Next I refine this account and consider several important questions about it, including the appropriate (...)
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  31. The Reality of (Non‐Aesthetic) Artistic Value.Louise Hanson - 2013 - Philosophical Quarterly 63 (252):492-508.
    It has become increasingly common for philosophers to make use of the concept of artistic value, and, further, to distinguish artistic value from aesthetic value. In a recent paper, ‘The Myth of (Non-Aesthetic) Artistic Value’, Dominic Lopes takes issue with this, presenting a kind of corrective to current philosophical practice regarding the use of the concept of artistic value. Here I am concerned to defend current practice against Lopes's attack. I argue that there is some unclarity as to what aspect (...)
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  32.  35
    What Connectionist Models Learn.Susan Hanson & D. Burr - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences.
  33.  12
    The Logic of Scientific Discovery.Patterns of Discovery.Karl R. Popper & Norwood R. Hanson - 1960 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 21 (2):266-268.
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  34.  59
    Shall We Vote on Values, But Bet on Beliefs?Robin Hanson - 2013 - Journal of Political Philosophy 21 (2):151-178.
    Policy disputes arise at all scales of governance: in clubs, non-profits, firms, nations, and alliances of nations. Both the means and ends of policy are disputed. While many, perhaps most, policy disputes arise from conflicting ends, important disputes also arise from differing beliefs on how to achieve shared ends. In fact, according to many experts in economics and development, governments often choose policies that are “inefficient” in the sense that most everyone could expect to gain from other feasible policies. Many (...)
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  35.  78
    Beyond the Skin Bag: On the Moral Responsibility of Extended Agencies.F. Allan Hanson - 2009 - Ethics and Information Technology 11 (1):91-99.
    The growing prominence of computers in contemporary life, often seemingly with minds of their own, invites rethinking the question of moral responsibility. If the moral responsibility for an act lies with the subject that carried it out, it follows that different concepts of the subject generate different views of moral responsibility. Some recent theorists have argued that actions are produced by composite, fluid subjects understood as extended agencies (cyborgs, actor networks). This view of the subject contrasts with methodological individualism: the (...)
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  36. If Uploads Come First.Robin Hanson - unknown
    What if we someday learn how to model small brain units, and so can "upload" ourselves into new computer brains? What if this happens before we learn how to make human-level artificial intelligences? The result could be a sharp transition to an upload-dominated world, with many dramatic consequences. In particular, fast and cheap replication may once again make Darwinian evolution of human values a powerful force in human history. With evolved values, most uploads would value life even when life is (...)
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  37. The Great Filter - Are We Almost Past It?Robin Hanson - unknown
    Humanity seems to have a bright future, i.e., a non-trivial chance of expanding to fill the universe with lasting life. But the fact that space near us seems dead now tells us that any given piece of dead matter faces an astronomically low chance of begating such a future. There thus exists a great filter between death and expanding lasting life, and humanity faces the ominous question: how far along this filter are we?
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  38.  47
    Artistic Value is Attributive Goodness.Louise Hanson - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 75 (4):415-427.
    It is common to distinguish between attributive and predicative goodness. There are good reasons to think that artistic value is a kind of attributive goodness. Surprisingly, however, much debate in philosophical aesthetics has proceeded as though artistic value is a kind of predicative goodness. As I shall argue, recognising that artistic value is attributive goodness has important consequences for a number of debates in aesthetics.
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  39.  99
    Is Logic All in Our Heads? From Naturalism to Psychologism.Francis J. Pelletier, Renée Elio & Philip Hanson - 2008 - Studia Logica 88 (1):3-66.
    Psychologism in logic is the doctrine that the semantic content of logical terms is in some way a feature of human psychology. We consider the historically influential version of the doctrine, Psychological Individualism, and the many counter-arguments to it. We then propose and assess various modifications to the doctrine that might allow it to avoid the classical objections. We call these Psychological Descriptivism, Teleological Cognitive Architecture, and Ideal Cognizers. These characterizations give some order to the wide range of modern views (...)
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  40.  33
    Teaching Health Care Ethics: Why We Should Teach Nursing and Medical Students Together.Stephen Hanson - 2005 - Nursing Ethics 12 (2):167-176.
    This article argues that teaching medical and nursing students health care ethics in an interdisciplinary setting is beneficial for them. Doing so produces an education that is theoretically more consistent with the goals of health care ethics, can help to reduce moral stress and burnout, and can improve patient care. Based on a literature review, theoretical arguments and individual observation, this article will show that the benefits of interdisciplinary education, specifically in ethics, outweigh the difficulties many schools may have in (...)
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  41. The Goals of Medicine the Forgotten Issue in Health Care Reform.Mark J. Hanson & Daniel Callahan - 1999
     
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  42. Burning the Cosmic Commons: Evolutionary Strategies for Interstellar Colonization.Robin Hanson - manuscript
    Attempts to model interstellar colonization may seem hopelessly compromised by uncertainties regarding the technologies and preferences of advanced civilizations. If light speed limits travel speeds, however, then a selection effect may eventually determine frontier behavior. Making weak assumptions about colonization technology, we use this selection effect to predict colonists’ behavior, including which oases they colonize, how long they stay there, how many seeds they then launch, how fast and far those seeds fly, and how behavior changes with increasing congestion. This (...)
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  43.  15
    Complete Recovery of a Masked Visual Target.Alfred B. Kristofferson, John Galloway & Robert G. Hanson - 1979 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 13 (1):5-6.
  44.  81
    Are Disagreements Honest.Tyler Cowen & Robin Hanson - forthcoming - Journal of Economic Methodology.
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  45. Economic Growth Given Machine Intelligence.Robin Hanson - unknown
    A simple exogenous growth model gives conservative estimates of the economic implications of machine intelligence. Machines complement human labor when they become more productive at the jobs they perform, but machines also substitute for human labor by taking over human jobs. At first, expensive hardware and software does only the few jobs where computers have the strongest advantage over humans. Eventually, computers do most jobs. At first, complementary effects dominate, and human wages rise with computer productivity. But eventually substitution can (...)
     
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  46. How to Live in a Simulation.Robin Hanson - 2001 - Journal of Evolution and Technology 7 (1).
    If you might be living in a simulation then all else equal you should care less about others, live more for today, make your world look more likely to become rich, expect to and try more to participate in pivotal events, be more entertaining and praiseworthy, and keep the famous people around you happier and more interested in you.
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  47. Mr. Pap on Synonymity.Norwood R. Hanson - 1951 - Mind 60 (240):548-549.
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  48.  30
    Could Gambling Save Science? Encouraging an Honest Consensus.Robin Hanson - 1995 - Social Epistemology 9 (1):3-33.
    The pace of scientific progress may be hindered by the tendency of our academic institutions to reward being popular rather than being right. A market-based alternative, where scientists can more formally 'stake their reputation', is presented here. It offers clear incentives to be careful and honest while contributing to a visible, self-consistent consensus on controversial scientific questions. In addition, it allows patrons to choose questions to be researched without choosing people or methods. The bulk of this paper is spent in (...)
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  49. Is There a Logic of Scientific Discovery?Norwood Russell Hanson - 1960 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 38 (2):91 – 106.
  50. Decadence and Catholicism.Kevin Kopelson & Ellis Hanson - 2002 - Substance 31 (1):129.
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