17 found
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  1.  68
    Perception, Aspects and Explanation: Some Remarks on Moderate Partisanship.Leon Culbertson - 2015 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 9 (2):182-204.
    Modifying a contrast introduced by Dixon, Stephen Mumford distinguishes between ‘partisan’ and ‘purist’ ways of watching sport. Recognising that the extreme partisan and extreme purist positions do not explain the nature of sports spectatorship, Mumford follows Dixon in adopting the idea of moderate partisanship. He outlines three theories of spectatorship designed to address the issue of the relationship between the partisan and the purist ways of viewing sport. The true perception theory regards the moderate fan as able to see the (...)
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  2.  11
    Scylla and Charybdis: The Purist’s Dilemma.Leon Culbertson - 2016 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 10 (2):175-196.
    This paper explores the view that, on Mumford’s account of the purist, to the degree that the purist adopts an aesthetic perspective, he or she doesn’t watch the sport in question, and to the degree that he or she does watch the sport, there is a loss of aesthetic appreciation. The idea that spectators oscillate between partisanship and purism means that the purist is unable to avoid either the Scylla of not actually watching the sport, or the Charybdis of loss (...)
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  3.  16
    Logic, Rules and Intention: The Principal Aim Argument.Leon Culbertson - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (4):440-452.
    Stephen Mumford develops his view of sport spectatorship partly through a rejection of an argument he attributes to Best, which distinguishes between two categories of sports, the ‘purposive’ and the ‘aesthetic’, on the basis of the claim that they have different principal aims. This paper considers the principal aim argument and one feature of Mumford’s rejection of that argument, namely, Best’s observation that the distinctions to which he draws attention are based on logical differences. The paper argues that Mumford misconstrues (...)
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  4.  97
    Does Sport Have Intrinsic Value?Leon Culbertson - 2008 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 2 (3):302 – 320.
    This paper considers the suggestion, central to McFee's (2004) moral laboratory argument, that sport is intrinsically valuable. McFee's position is outlined and critiqued and various interpretations of intrinsic value found in the philosophical literature are considered. In addition, Morgan's (2007) claim that sport is an appropriate final end is considered and partially accepted. The paper draws a number of terminological distinctions and concludes that sport does not have intrinsic value as traditionally conceived, but that this is of little consequence with (...)
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  5.  8
    Intention, Description and the Aesthetic: The by-Product Argument.Leon Culbertson - 2016 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 43 (3):440-453.
    Stephen Mumford argues that positive aesthetic value is a by-product of both sport and art, and that the principal aim of the artist and the player or athlete could not be to produce positive aesthetic value. Three features of Mumford’s by-product argument are considered. It is argued that problems arise as a result of failure to appreciate Best’s distinction between the evaluative and conceptual uses of ‘aesthetic’, the nature of the descriptions Mumford gives of the intention of the artist in (...)
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  6.  10
    Pandora Logic: Rules, Moral Judgement and the Fundamental Principles of Olympism.Leon Culbertson - 2012 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 6 (2):195-210.
    This article is concerned with the role of moral principles, specifically the Fundamental Principles of Olympism, in the judgements of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) on matters of performance enhancement. The article begins with two pairs of distinctions, that between moral judgements and morally-laden judgements, and that between the moral judgement of cases and the ethical environment of a society. The article is concerned with working through the implications of those distinctions in the context of the IOC's judgements on performance (...)
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  7.  23
    The Paradox of Bad Faith and Elite Competitive Sport.Leon Culbertson - 2005 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 32 (1):65-86.
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  8.  12
    Purism and the Category of ‘the Aesthetic’: The Drama Argument.Leon Culbertson - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (1):1-14.
    This paper examines one component of Stephen Mumford’s case for the claim that we should regard sport, art and the aesthetic as more closely connected than has tended to be the case, under the influence of the work of David Best, in recent years. Mumford’s rejection of what I call ‘the drama argument’ is examined in detail and it is argued that all but one element of his case fails to do the job he envisages.
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  9.  18
    Criteria, Defeasibility and Rules: Intention and the Principal Aim Argument.Leon Culbertson - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (2):149-161.
    This paper builds on a previous discussion of Stephen Mumford’s rejection of what he takes to be David Best’s argument for a distinction between purposive and aesthetic sports. That discussion concluded that Mumford’s argument misses its target, but closed by introducing a possible alternative argument, not made by Mumford, that might be thought to have the potential to secure Mumford’s conclusion. This paper considers that alternative argument, namely, the thought that the ascription of psychological predicates conceived of in terms of (...)
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  10.  62
    Sartre on Human Nature: Humanness, Transhumanism and Performance-Enhancement.Leon Culbertson - 2011 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 5 (3):231 - 244.
    This article is concerned with an apparent similarity between the conceptions of human nature found in the early work of Jean-Paul Sartre and certain forms of transhumanism, and the role of a particular conception of human nature in the application of transhumanist ideas to debates on performance-enhancement. The article begins with a brief outline of major features of Sartre's phenomenological work (?I). The article then gives a more detailed account of the relationship between Sartre's phenomenological ontology and the view of (...)
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  11.  46
    ‘Human-Ness’, ‘Dehumanisation’ and Performance Enhancement.Leon Culbertson - 2007 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 1 (2):195 – 217.
    This paper focuses on the claim by Schneider and Butcher (2000) that it makes little sense to criticise the use of performance-enhancing drugs as ?dehumanising? (as, for example, Hoberman does (1992)) because we are unable to give a satisfactory account of what it is to be human. Schneider and Butcher (2000, 196) put this as follows: ?The dehumanisation argument is interesting but incomplete. It is incomplete because we do not have an agreed-upon conception of what it is to be human. (...)
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  12.  24
    Genetic Enhancement in the Dark.Leon Culbertson - 2009 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 36 (2):140-151.
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  13.  2
    Meaning and Use: Drama and the Aesthetic.Leon Culbertson - forthcoming - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-22.
    This paper considers David Best’s claim that descriptions of events in sport as being ‘dramatic’ or ‘tragic’ employ those terms in a figurative sense, along with Stephen Mumford’s rejection of that...
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  14.  1
    The Best Way to Locate a Purpose in Sport: Considerations in Aesthetics?Leon Culbertson & Graham McFee - 2016 - Aesthetic Investigations 1 (2):191-213.
    The paper highlights the centrality of some concepts from philosophy of sport for philosophical aesthetics. Once Best conclusively answered negatively the fundamental question, ‘Can any sport-form be an artform?’, what further issues remained at the intersection of these parts of philosophy? Recent work revitalizing this interface, especially Mumford’s Watching Sport, contested Best’s fundamental distinction between purposive and aesthetic sports, and insisted that purist viewers are taking an aesthetic interest in sporting events. Here, we defend Best’s conception against considerations Mumford hoped (...)
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  15.  31
    Sartre on the Body.Leon Culbertson - 2011 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 5 (1):82-87.
  16.  18
    Genetically Modifi Ed Athletes: Biomedical Ethics, Gene Doping and Sport By Andy Miah. Published 2004 by Routledge, London, UK.Leon Culbertson - 2006 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 33 (1):103-105.
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  17.  18
    Human Enhancement and Enhancing Human Capacities.Leon Culbertson - 2013 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 7 (2):283-291.
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