12 found
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  1.  35
    Maximization Theory in Behavioral Psychology.Howard Rachlin, Ray Battalio, John Kagel & Leonard Green - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):371-388.
  2.  4
    Self-Control in Context.Leonard Green & Edwin B. Fisher - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):684-685.
  3.  27
    Pavlovian Conditioned Responses: Some Elusive Results and an Indeterminate Explanation.Leonard Green - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (3):402-403.
  4.  18
    Dissociations in Future Thinking Following Hippocampal Damage: Evidence From Discounting and Time Perspective in Episodic Amnesia.Donna Kwan, Carl F. Craver, Leonard Green, Joel Myerson & R. Shayna Rosenbaum - 2013 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 142 (4):1355.
  5.  12
    Maximization Theory Vindicated.Howard Rachlin, Ray Battalio, John Kagel & Leonard Green - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):405-417.
    Maximization theory, which is borrowed from economics, provides techniques for predicing the behavior of animals - including humans. A theoretical behavioral space is constructed in which each point represents a given combination of various behavioral alternatives. With two alternatives - behavior A and behavior B - each point within the space represents a certain amount of time spent performing behavior A and a certain amount of time spent performing behavior B. A particular environmental situation can be described as a constraint (...)
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  6. Economic Choice Theory: An Experimental Analysis of Animal Behavior.John H. Kagel, Raymond C. Battalio & Leonard Green - 1995 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book details the results of the authors' research using laboratory animals to investigate individual choice theory in economics-consumer-demand and labour supply behaviour and choice under uncertainty. The use of laboratory animals provides the opportunity to conduct controlled experiments involving precise and demanding tests of economic theory with rewards and punishments of real consequence. Economic models are compared to psychological and biological choice models along with the results of experiments testing between these competing explanations. Results of animal experiments are used (...)
     
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  7.  3
    The Effect of Rotation on the Learning of Taste Aversions.Leonard Green & Howard Rachlin - 1973 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 1 (2):137-138.
  8.  28
    Choice Between Long- and Short-Term Interests: Beyond Self-Control.Leonard Green & Joel Myerson - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):127-128.
    In the real world, there are choices between large, delayed, punctate rewards and small, more immediate rewards as well as choices between patterns and acts. A common element in these situations is the choice between long- and short-term interests. Key issues for future research appear to be how acts are restructured into larger patterns of behavior, and whether, as Rachlin implies, pattern perception is the cause of pattern generation.
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  9.  6
    Interview: Fredric Jameson.Fredric Jameson, Leonard Green, Jonathan Culler & Richard Klein - 1982 - Diacritics 12 (3):72.
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  10.  10
    Matching Versus Maximizing: Comments on Prelec's Paper.John H. Kagel, Raymond C. Battalio & Leonard Green - 1983 - Psychological Review 90 (4):380-384.
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  11.  10
    The Concept of Leisure in Maximization Theory.Howard Rachlin, Ray Battalio, John Kage & Leonard Green - 1983 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (2):330-333.
  12.  15
    Hyperbola-Like Discounting, Impulsivity, and the Analysis of Will.Leonard Green & Joel Myerson - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (5):655-656.
    Ainslie's insightful treatment of dynamically inconsistent choice stands in contrast to traditional views in psychology, economics, and philosophy. We comment on the form of the discounting function and on new findings regarding choice between delayed rewards. Finally, we argue that the positive correlation between temporal and probability discounting is inconsistent with the view that impulsivity represents a unitary trait.
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