19 found
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  1.  23
    Leibniz on Evil.Leroy T. Howe - 1971 - Sophia 10 (3):8-17.
  2.  18
    Existence as a Perfection: A Reconsideration of the Ontological Argument.Leroy T. Howe - 1968 - Religious Studies 4 (1):78 - 101.
  3.  26
    Philosophical Theology as a Venture of Faith.Leroy T. Howe - 1970 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 44:205.
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  4. Karl Jaspers on History: In Appreciation.Leroy T. Howe - 1971 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 52 (4):692.
     
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  5. 'Perfection' in the Ontological Argument.Leroy T. Howe - 1972 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 46:58.
     
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  6.  34
    The Ambiguity of “Perfection” in the Ontological Argument.Leroy T. Howe - 1972 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 46:58-70.
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  7.  17
    Ontology, Belief, and the Doctrine of the Trinity.Leroy T. Howe - 1981 - Sophia 20 (1):5 - 16.
    IN THE CHRISTIAN TRADITION, IT IS GENERALLY AGREED THAT THE DOCTRINE OF THE TRINITY REPRESENTS CHRISTIANITY’S MOST CAREFULLY ARTICULATED CONCEPTUALIZATION OF DIVINE BEING. AS PAUL TILLICH HAS POINTED OUT, TRINITARIAN "THINKING" IS PRESENT IN MANY RELIGIOUS TRADITIONS, BUT THERE IS NOTHING LIKE A "DOCTRINE" OF THE TRINITY TO BE FOUND EXCEPT IN CHRISTIANITY. THIS ESSAY ATTEMPTS TO SHOW THAT, PRECISELY AS DOCTRINE, TRINITARIANISM REPRESENTS A UNIQUE CONTRIBUTION TO HUMANKIND’S REFLECTION ABOUT TRANSCENDENT REALITY.
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  8.  17
    Is the World Ex Nihilo?Leroy T. Howe - 1967 - Sophia 6 (1):21-29.
  9.  10
    Self-Consciousness and the Normative in Christian Theology: LEROY T. HOWE.Leroy T. Howe - 1976 - Religious Studies 12 (3):319-330.
    If Christian theology is that enterprise whose essential purpose is to understand the faith of the Christian Church, then it must approach that faith from the perspective not only of its transcendent source, but also as a human achievement, a creative interpretation of those events in which transcendent reality discloses itself for appropriation. Few theologians would deny that theology has to do primarily with the ways in which ultimate reality becomes manifest in human beings' faithful responses, in belief and trust, (...)
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  10.  14
    Conceivability and the Ontological Argument.Leroy T. Howe - 1966 - Sophia 5 (1):3-8.
  11.  11
    Kierkegaard on Faith and Reason.Leroy T. Howe - 1969 - Sophia 8 (1):15-24.
  12.  8
    The Ambiguity of “Perfection” in the Ontological Argument.Leroy T. Howe - 1972 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 46:58-70.
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  13.  7
    On Theology as the Understanding of Faith.Leroy T. Howe - 1977 - Sophia 16 (1):7-15.
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  14.  7
    The Necessity Of Creation.Leroy T. Howe - 1971 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 2 (2):96-112.
  15.  21
    One God, One Proof.Leroy T. Howe - 1968 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 6 (4):235-245.
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  16.  5
    Philosophical Theology as a Venture of Faith: Some Theses for Discussion.Leroy T. Howe - 1970 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 44:205-213.
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  17.  11
    A Preface to Theological Philosophy.Leroy T. Howe - 1972 - Heythrop Journal 13 (1):54–62.
  18.  14
    Existence as a Perfection: A Reconsideration of the Ontological Argument: LEROY T. HOWE.Leroy T. Howe - 1968 - Religious Studies 4 (1):78-101.
    Anselm's two ‘ontological’ arguments rest upon three fundamental assertions: The idea of God is the idea of a being than which nothing more perfect is conceivable. Whatever exists in the understanding and outside the understanding is more perfect than whatever exists in the understanding alone. Whatever cannot be conceived not to exist is more perfect than whatever can be conceived not to exist.
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  19.  3
    One God, One Proof.Leroy T. Howe - 1968 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 6 (4):235-246.
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