7 found
Order:
  1.  38
    Cultural Group Selection Plays an Essential Role in Explaining Human Cooperation: A Sketch of the Evidence.Peter Richerson, Ryan Baldini, Adrian V. Bell, Kathryn Demps, Karl Frost, Vicken Hillis, Sarah Mathew, Emily K. Newton, Nicole Naar, Lesley Newson, Cody Ross, Paul E. Smaldino, Timothy M. Waring & Matthew Zefferman - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39:1-71.
    Human cooperation is highly unusual. We live in large groups composed mostly of non-relatives. Evolutionists have proposed a number of explanations for this pattern, including cultural group selection and extensions of more general processes such as reciprocity, kin selection, and multi-level selection acting on genes. Evolutionary processes are consilient; they affect several different empirical domains, such as patterns of behavior and the proximal drivers of that behavior. In this target article, we sketch the evidence from five domains that bear on (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   43 citations  
  2. .Peter J. Richerson & Lesley Newson - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  3.  17
    Cultural Group Selection Follows Darwin's Classic Syllogism for the Operation of Selection.Peter Richerson, Ryan Baldini, Adrian V. Bell, Kathryn Demps, Karl Frost, Vicken Hillis, Sarah Mathew, Emily K. Newton, Nicole Naar, Lesley Newson, Cody Ross, Paul E. Smaldino, Timothy M. Waring & Matthew Zefferman - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  4. Cultural Evolution and the Shaping of Cultural Diversity.Lesley Newson, Peter Richerson & Robert Boyd - 2007 - Handbook of Cultural Psychology.
    This chapter focuses on the way that cultures change and how cultural diversity is created, maintained and lost. Human culture is the inevitable result of the way our species acquires its behavior. We are extremely social animals and an overwhelming proportion of our behavior is socially learned. The behavior of other animals is largely a product of innate evolved determinants of behavior combined with individual learning. They make quite modest use of social learning while we acquire a massive cultural repertoire (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  5. Is Religion Adaptive? Yes, No, Neutral. But Mostly We Don’T Know.Peter J. Richerson & Lesley Newson - 2009 - In Jeffrey Schloss & Michael J. Murray (eds.), The Believing Primate: Scientific, Philosophical, and Theological Reflections on the Origin of Religion. Oxford University Press. pp. 100-117.
    This chapter examines whether religion is adaptive: if it changes from one generation to another, from a specific culture to another, and how other domains of culture influence changes in a certain religion. It begins by providing the basics of evolution, including adaptation and selection of characteristics at multiple levels. It explains how religion promotes cooperation, and which elements of religion contribute to this and how effective they are. Also, it explores how established churches depend and select a certain frequency (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  23
    The Limits Imposed by Culture: Are Symmetry Preferences Evidence of a Recent Reproductive Strategy or a Common Primate Inheritance?Lesley Newson & Stephen Lea - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):618-619.
    Women's preference for symmetrical men need not have evolved as part of a good gene sexual selection (GGSS) reproductive strategy employed during recent human evolutionary history. It may be a remnant of the reproductive strategy of a perhaps promiscuous species which existed prior to the divergence of the human line from that of the bonobo and chimp.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  18
    Less Restricted Mating, Low Contact with Kin, and the Role of Culture.Lesley Newson & Tom Postmes - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):291-292.
    On the basis of a reinterpretation of the International Sexuality Description Project (ISDP) data, we suggest that findings are consistent with the view that human reproductive behaviour is largely under social control. Behaviours associated with a high Sociosexual Orientation Index (SOI) may be part of a progressive change in reproductive behaviour initiated by the dispersal of kin that occurs as societies modernize.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark