Results for 'Lexical access'

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  1. A Theory of Lexical Access in Speech Production.Willem J. M. Levelt, Ardi Roelofs & Antje S. Meyer - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (1):1-38.
    Preparing words in speech production is normally a fast and accurate process. We generate them two or three per second in fluent conversation; and overtly naming a clear picture of an object can easily be initiated within 600 msec after picture onset. The underlying process, however, is exceedingly complex. The theory reviewed in this target article analyzes this process as staged and feedforward. After a first stage of conceptual preparation, word generation proceeds through lexical selection, morphological and phonological encoding, (...)
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  2.  4
    Rapid Influence of Word‐Talker Associations on Lexical Access.Jonny Kim & Katie Drager - 2018 - Topics in Cognitive Science 10 (4):775-786.
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  3.  41
    Flexibility in Embodied Language Processing: Context Effects in Lexical Access.Wessel O. Dam, Inti A. Brazil, Harold Bekkering & Shirley‐Ann Rueschemeyer - 2014 - Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (3):407-424.
    According to embodied theories of language (ETLs), word meaning relies on sensorimotor brain areas, generally dedicated to acting and perceiving in the real world. More specifically, words denoting actions are postulated to make use of neural motor areas, while words denoting visual properties draw on the resources of visual brain areas. Therefore, there is a direct correspondence between word meaning and the experience a listener has had with a word's referent on the brain level. Behavioral and neuroimaging studies have provided (...)
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  4.  5
    On the Role of Regular Phonological Variation in Lexical Access: Evidence From Voice Assimilation in French.Natalie D. Snoeren, Juan Seguí & Pierre André Hallé - 2008 - Cognition 108 (2):512-521.
    The present study investigated whether lexical access is affected by a regular phonological variation in connected speech: voice assimilation in French. Two associative priming experiments were conducted to determine whether strongly assimilated, potentially ambiguous word forms activate the conceptual representation of the underlying word. Would the ambiguous word form [sud] (either assimilated soute 'hold' or soude 'soda') facilitate 'bagage' 'luggage', which is semantically related to soute but not to soude? In Experiment 1, words in either canonical or strongly (...)
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  5.  39
    Perceptual Fluency and Lexical Access for Function Versus Content Words.Sidney J. Segalowitz & Korri Lane - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (2):307-308.
    By examining single-word reading times (in full sentences read for meaning), we show that (1) function words are accessed faster than content words, independent of perceptual characteristics; (2) previous failures to show this involved problems of frequency range and task used; and (3) these differences in lexical access are related to perceptual fluency. We relate these findings to issues in the literature on event-related potentials (ERPs) and neurolinguistics.
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  6.  16
    Lexical Access as a Brain Mechanism.Friedemann Pulvermüller - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (2):297-299.
    The following questions are addressed concerning how a theory of lexical access can be realized in the brain: (1) Can a brainlike device function without inhibitory mechanisms? (2) Where in the brain can one expect to find processes underlying access to word semantics, syntactic word properties, phonological word forms, and their phonetic gestures? (3) If large neuron ensembles are the basis of such processes, how can one expect these populations to be connected? (4) In particular, how could (...)
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  7.  9
    Lexical Access as a Brain Mechanism.Friedemann PulvermÜ & Ller - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (1):52-54.
    The following questions are addressed concerning how a theory of lexical access can be realized in the brain: (1) Can a brainlike device function without inhibitory mechanisms? (2) Where in the brain can one expect to find processes underlying access to word semantics, syntactic word properties, phonological word forms, and their phonetic gestures? (3) If large neuron ensembles are the basis of such processes, how can one expect these populations to be connected? (4) In particular, how could (...)
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  8.  4
    Echoes of Echoes? An Episodic Theory of Lexical Access.Stephen D. Goldinger - 1998 - Psychological Review 105 (2):251-279.
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  9.  6
    Lexical Access with and Without Awareness.Carol A. Fowler, George Wolford, Ronald Slade & Louis Tassinary - 1981 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 110 (3):341-362.
  10.  11
    The Dark Side of Incremental Learning: A Model of Cumulative Semantic Interference During Lexical Access in Speech Production.Gary M. Oppenheim, Gary S. Dell & Myrna F. Schwartz - 2010 - Cognition 114 (2):227-252.
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  11.  7
    Lexical Access in Aphasic and Nonaphasic Speakers.Gary S. Dell, Myrna F. Schwartz, Nadine Martin, Eleanor M. Saffran & Deborah A. Gagnon - 1997 - Psychological Review 104 (4):801-838.
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  12.  17
    Heeding the Voice of Experience: The Role of Talker Variation in Lexical Access.Sarah C. Creel, Richard N. Aslin & Michael K. Tanenhaus - 2008 - Cognition 106 (2):633-664.
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  13.  10
    The Dark Side of Incremental Learning: A Model of Cumulative Semantic Interference During Lexical Access in Speech Production.Myrna F. Schwartz Gary M. Oppenheim, Gary S. Dell - 2010 - Cognition 114 (2):227.
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  14.  11
    Stages of Lexical Access in Language Production.Gary S. Dell & Padraig G. O'Seaghdha - 1992 - Cognition 42 (1-3):287-314.
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  15.  17
    Frequency Drives Lexical Access in Reading but Not in Speaking: The Frequency-Lag Hypothesis.Tamar H. Gollan, Timothy J. Slattery, Diane Goldenberg, Eva Van Assche, Wouter Duyck & Keith Rayner - 2011 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 140 (2):186-209.
  16.  11
    Waiting for Lexical Access: Cochlear Implants or Severely Degraded Input Lead Listeners to Process Speech Less Incrementally.Bob McMurray, Ashley Farris-Trimble & Hannah Rigler - 2017 - Cognition 169:147-164.
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  17.  18
    Lexical Access and Inflectional Morphology.Alfonso Caramazza, Alessandro Laudanna & Cristina Romani - 1988 - Cognition 28 (3):297-332.
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  18.  24
    Gradient Effects of Within-Category Phonetic Variation on Lexical Access.Bob McMurray, Michael K. Tanenhaus & Richard N. Aslin - 2002 - Cognition 86 (2):B33-B42.
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  19.  19
    Lexical Access and Frequency Sensitivity: Frequency Saturation and Open/Closed Class Equivalence.Barry Gordon & Alfonso Caramazza - 1985 - Cognition 21 (2):95-115.
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  20.  1
    The Time Course of Lexical Access in Speech Production: A Study of Picture Naming.Willem J. Levelt, Herbert Schriefers, Dirk Vorberg & Antje S. Meyer - 1991 - Psychological Review 98 (1):122-142.
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  21.  13
    Serial Mechanisms in Lexical Access: The Rank Hypothesis.W. S. Murray & K. I. Forster - 2004 - Psychological Review 111 (3):721-756.
  22.  11
    The Roles of Shared Vs. Distinctive Conceptual Features in Lexical Access.Harrison E. Vieth, Katie L. McMahon & Greig I. de Zubicaray - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  23.  25
    Levels of Perceptual Representation and Process in Lexical Access: Words, Phonemes, and Features.William Marslen-Wilson & Paul Warren - 1994 - Psychological Review 101 (4):653-675.
  24.  6
    Lexical Access: A Perspective From Pathology.John C. Marshall & Freda Newcombe - 1981 - Cognition 10 (1-3):209-214.
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  25.  2
    Can the Humped Animal's Knee Conceal its Name? Commentary On: “The Roles of Shared Vs. Distinctive Conceptual Features in Lexical Access”.Maria Montefinese & David Vinson - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  26.  11
    The Effect of Subphonetic Differences on Lexical Access.Jean E. Andruski, Sheila E. Blumstein & Martha Burton - 1994 - Cognition 52 (3):163-187.
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  27.  17
    The Relation Between Syntactic and Phonological Knowledge in Lexical Access: Evidence From the `Tip-of-the-Tongue' Phenomenon.Alfonso Caramazza & Michele Miozzo - 1997 - Cognition 64 (3):309-343.
  28.  21
    Connectionist Models of Language Production: Lexical Access and Grammatical Encoding.Gary S. Dell, Franklin Chang & Zenzi M. Griffin - 1999 - Cognitive Science 23 (4):517-542.
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  29. Lexical Access with and Without Awareness.C. A. Fowler, G. Woldford, R. Slade & L. Tassinary - 1981 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 110:341-62.
     
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  30.  20
    Non-Selective Lexical Access in Bilinguals is Spontaneous and Independent of Input Monitoring: Evidence From Eye Tracking.Yan Jing Wu, Filipe Cristino, Charles Leek & Guillaume Thierry - 2013 - Cognition 129 (2):418-425.
  31. The Role of Visual Form in Lexical Access: Evidence From Chinese Classifier Production.Yanchao Bi, Xi Yu, Jingyi Geng & F. -Xavier Alario - 2010 - Cognition 116 (1):101-109.
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  32.  4
    When Language Switching has No Apparent Cost: Lexical Access in Sentence Context.Jason W. Gullifer, Judith F. Kroll & Paola E. Dussias - 2013 - Frontiers in Psychology 4.
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  33.  3
    Visual Lexical Access is Initially Phonological: 2. Evidence From Phonological Priming by Homophones and Pseudohomophones.Georgije Lukatela & M. T. Turvey - 1994 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 123 (4):331-353.
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  34.  10
    Lexical Access in Catalan Signed Language Production.Cristina Baus, Eva Gutiérrez-Sigut, Josep Quer & Manuel Carreiras - 2008 - Cognition 108 (3):856-865.
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  35.  8
    Visual Lexical Access is Initially Phonological: I. Evidence From Associative Priming by Words, Homophones, and Pseudohomophones.Georgije Lukatela & M. T. Turvey - 1994 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 123 (2):107-128.
  36.  3
    Sub- and Supralexical Information in Early Phases of Lexical Access.Juhani Järvikivi - 2011 - Frontiers in Psychology 2.
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  37.  29
    Semantic Effects in Lexical Access: Evidence From Single-Word Naming.Lee Wurm, Douglas Vakoch, Joanna Aycock & Robyn Childers - 2003 - Cognition and Emotion 17 (4):547-565.
  38.  1
    An Evaluation of a Computational Model of Lexical Access: Comment on Dell Et Al.Wheeler Ruml & Alfonso Caramazza - 2000 - Psychological Review 107 (3):609-634.
  39.  7
    Are Root Letters Compulsory for Lexical Access in Semitic Languages? The Case of Masked Form-Priming in Arabic.Manuel Perea, Reem Abu Mallouh & Manuel Carreiras - 2014 - Cognition 132 (3):491-500.
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  40.  5
    Do Iconic Gestures Have a Functional Role in Lexical Access? An Experimental Study of the Effects of Repeating a Verbal Message on Gesture Production.Geoffrey Beattie & Jane Coughlan - 1998 - Semiotica 119 (3-4):221-250.
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  41.  10
    Lexical Access and Discourse Planning: Bottom-Up Interference or Top-Down Control Troubles?Wendy G. Lehnert - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):528-529.
  42.  11
    Lexical Access in the Production of Pronouns.Bernadette M. Schmitt, Antje S. Meyer & Willem J. M. Levelt - 1999 - Cognition 69 (3):313-335.
  43.  4
    Phonological Factors in Lexical Access: Evidence From an Auditory Lexical Decision Task.William Milberg, Sheila Blumstein & Barbara Dworetzky - 1988 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 26 (4):305-308.
  44.  5
    Lexical Access in the Production of Noun Phrases.H. Schriefers - 1992 - Cognition 45 (1):33-54.
  45.  20
    The Effect of Syntactic and Semantic Cues on Lexical Access in Broca’s Aphasia.Ferrill Michelle, Love Tracy, Sullivan Natalie, MacKenzie Shannon & Shapiro Lewis - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  46.  18
    Lexical Access in Bilinguals.Alfonso Caramazza & Isabel Brones - 1979 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 13 (4):212-214.
  47.  4
    What You See Isn’T Always What You Get: Auditory Word Signals Trump Consciously Perceived Words in Lexical Access.Rachel Ostrand, Sheila E. Blumstein, Victor S. Ferreira & James L. Morgan - 2016 - Cognition 151:96-107.
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  48. Lexical Access in Speech Production [Special Issue].W. J. M. Levelt - 1992 - Cognition 42 (1-3).
     
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  49.  13
    Lexical Access.Anne Cutler - 2003 - In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group.
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  50.  10
    The Wide-Open Doors to Lexical Access.Jon A. Duñabeitia & Nicola Molinaro - 2013 - Frontiers in Psychology 4.
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