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Licia Carlson
Providence College
  1.  38
    The Faces of Intellectual Disability: Philosophical Reflections.Licia Carlson - 2009 - Indiana University Press.
    In a challenge to current thinking about cognitive impairment, this book explores what it means to treat people with intellectual disabilities in an ethical manner.
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  2. Cognitive Disability and its Challenge to Moral Philosophy.Eva Feder Kittay & Licia Carlson (eds.) - 2010 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    Through a series of essays contributed by clinicians, medical historians, and prominent moral philosophers, Cognitive Disability and Its Challenge to Moral ...
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  3.  50
    Cognitive Ableism and Disability Studies: Feminist Reflections on the History of Mental Retardation.Licia Carlson - 2001 - Hypatia 16 (4):124-146.
    This paper examines five groups of women that were instrumental in the emergence of the category of “feeblemindedness” in the United States. It analyzes the dynamics of oppression and power relations in the following five groups of women: “feebleminded” women, institutional caregivers, mothers, researchers, and reformists. Ultimately, I argue that a feminist analysis of the history of mental retardation is necessary to serve as a guide for future feminist work on cognitive disability.
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  4.  59
    Feminist Approaches to Cognitive Disability.Licia Carlson - 2016 - Philosophy Compass 11 (10):541-553.
    This essay explores various philosophical approaches to cognitive disability within feminist philosophy. In doing so, it addresses three broad questions: What positive contributions can feminist philosophy make to the philosophy of cognitive disability? How have feminist philosophers critiqued the presence and absence of cognitive disability in philosophy? And what challenges does cognitive disability pose to feminist philosophy itself? The essay begins with definitions and models of disability and then turns to feminist work on cognitive disability in moral and political philosophy, (...)
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  5.  80
    Philosophers of intellectual disability: A taxonomy.Licia Carlson - 2009 - Metaphilosophy 40 (3-4):552-566.
    This essay explores various roles that philosophers occupy in relation to intellectual disability. In examining how philosophers define their object of inquiry as experts and gatekeepers, it raises critical questions concerning the nature of philosophical discourse about intellectual disability. It then goes on to consider three alternate positions, the advocate or friend, the animal, and the “intellectually disabled,” each of which points to new ways of philosophizing in the face of intellectual disability.
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  6. Cognitive ableism and disability studies: Feminist reflections on the history of mental retardation.Licia Carlson - 2001 - Hypatia 16 (4):124-146.
    This paper examines five groups of women that were instrumental in the emergence of the category of "feeblemindedness" in the United States. It analyzes the dynamics of oppression and power relations in the following five groups of women: "feeble-minded" women, institutional caregivers, mothers, researchers, and reformists. Ultimately, I argue that a feminist analysis of the history of mental retardation is necessary to serve as a guide for future feminist work on cognitive disability.
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  7. Introduction: Rethinking philosophical presumptions in light of cognitive disability.Licia Carlson & Eva Feder Kittay - 2009 - Metaphilosophy 40 (3-4):307-330.
    This Introduction to the collection of essays surveys the philosophical literature to date with respect to five central questions: justice, care, agency, metaphilosophical issues regarding the language and representation of cognitive disability, and personhood. These themes are discussed in relation to three specific conditions: intellectual and developmental disabilities, Alzheimer's disease, and autism, though the issues raised are relevant to a broad range of cognitive disabilities. The Introduction offers a brief historical overview of the treatment cognitive disability has received from philosophers, (...)
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  8.  5
    Introduction: Rethinking Philosophical Presumptions in Light of Cognitive Disability.Licia Carlson & Eva Feder Kittay - 2010 - In Armen T. Marsoobian, Brian J. Huschle, Eric Cavallero, Eva Feder Kittay & Licia Carlson (eds.), Cognitive Disability and Its Challenge to Moral Philosophy. Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 1–25.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Why Philosophy and Cognitive Disability? Historical Overview Discussion of Themes and the Chapters Concluding Remarks References.
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  9.  1
    Philosophers of Intellectual Disability: A Taxonomy.Licia Carlson - 2010 - In Armen T. Marsoobian, Brian J. Huschle, Eric Cavallero, Eva Feder Kittay & Licia Carlson (eds.), Cognitive Disability and Its Challenge to Moral Philosophy. Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 315–329.
    This chapter contains sections titled: The Expert or Gatekeeper Family Member or Advocate The Nonhuman Animal The “Intellectually Disabled” References.
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  10.  5
    Phenomenology and the arts.Licia Carlson (ed.) - 2016 - Lanham: Lexington Books.
    This book develops the interplay between phenomenology as a historical movement and as a descriptive method within Continental philosophy and the arts.
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  11. Docile bodies, docile minds: Foucauldian reflections on mental retardation.Licia Carlson - 2005 - In Shelley Tremain (ed.), Foucault and the Government of Disability. University of Michigan Press. pp. 133--152.
     
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  12.  15
    The Human as Just an Other Animal.Licia Carlson - 2007 - In Christian Lotz & Corinne Painter (eds.), Phenomenology and the Non-Human Animal. Springer. pp. 117--133.
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  13. Introduction to Cognitive Disability and Its Challenge to Moral Philosophy.Eva Feder Kittay & Licia Carlson - 2000 - Metaphilosophy 31 (5):449-451.
  14.  4
    Intellectual Disability, Dehumanization, and the Fate of “the Human”.Licia Carlson - 2023 - Journal of Philosophy of Disability 3:47-70.
    Dehumanization Studies is a burgeoning field that has much to teach Critical Disability Studies and philosophers of disability. Conversely, a critical disability perspective can inform and challenge theoretical approaches to dehumanization. This paper attempts to forge a conversation between these interdisciplinary areas by exploring the phenomenon of dehumanization in relation to people with intellectual disabilities. It begins with a definition of disability dehumanization, and then explores the ways in which this form of dehumanization functions dynamically at multiple levels, drawing from (...)
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  15.  11
    Embracing Asymmetry and Humility in the Face of Disability.Licia Carlson - 2019 - Hastings Center Report 49 (3):28-29.
    In “The Relational Potential Standard,” in this issue of the Hastings Center Report, Aaron Wightman and colleagues propose “relational potential” as an addition to existing standards that are employed in making difficult decisions regarding life‐sustaining treatment for children with profound cognitive disabilities. They offer compelling explanations for why the expanded standard is important and why an approach grounded in an ethics of care is both necessary and justified. In what follows, I would like to explore asymmetries that emerge from their (...)
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  16.  3
    Shared musical lives: philosophy, disability, and the power of sonification.Licia Carlson - 2022 - New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
    Shared Musical Lives makes the case for the epistemological and ethical significance of musical experience. Music can be a source of self-knowledge and self-expression, and hence reveal important dimensions of the self to others. This knowledge - of both self and of others - has a moral force as well. Shared musical experience can transform and establish new modes of being with others, cultivate virtues, and expand the moral imagination. The term sonification (which means translating data into non-verbal audible tones) (...)
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  17.  16
    The Expert or Gatekeeper In his history of the modern prison, Michel Foucault writes:"The penitentiary technique and the delinquent are in a sense twin brothers.... They appeared together, the one extending from the other, as a technological ensemble that forms and fragments the object to which it". [REVIEW]A. Taxonomy & Licia Carlson - 2010 - In Eva Feder Kittay & Licia Carlson (eds.), Cognitive Disability and its Challenge to Moral Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 315.
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