Results for 'Limitation of medical intervention'

999 found
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  1.  44
    Evaluation of a Bioethics Committee Intervention: A Limitation of Medical Treatment Form. [REVIEW]James Lee Lindon, Jolaine R. Draugalis, Kenneth V. Iserson & Stephen Joel Coons - 1996 - HEC Forum 8 (3):145-156.
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  2.  64
    The Futility of Futility: Death Causation is the 'Elephant in the Room' in Discussions About Limitation of Medical Treatment. [REVIEW]Michael A. Ashby - 2011 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (2):151-154.
    The term futility has been widely used in medical ethics and clinical medicine for more than twenty years now. At first glance it appears to offer a clear-cut categorical characterisation of medical treatments at the end of life, and an apparently objective way of making decisions that are seen to be emotionally painful for those close to the patient, and ethically, and also potentially legally hazardous for clinicians. It also appears to deal with causation, because omission of a (...)
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  3. Parental Refusals of Medical Treatment: The Harm Principle as Threshold for State Intervention.Douglas Diekema - 2004 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (4):243-264.
    Minors are generally considered incompetent to provide legally binding decisions regarding their health care, and parents or guardians are empowered to make those decisions on their behalf. Parental authority is not absolute, however, and when a parent acts contrary to the best interests of a child, the state may intervene. The best interests standard is the threshold most frequently employed in challenging a parent''s refusal to provide consent for a child''s medical care. In this paper, I will argue that (...)
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  4. In the Absence of Running: From Injury and Medical Intervention to Art.Véronique Chance - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Humanities:1-16.
    In recent years, I have developed an endurance running art-practice as part of a larger inquiry into the performative nature of human physical activity. In the Absence of Running is series of artworks made using images from medical arthroscopic interventions following the diagnosis of medial meniscus tears to the cartilage and osteoarthritis in both my knees. Faced with not being able to run or to make artworks using running in the long-term, I turned to the tools of medical (...)
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  5.  23
    The Fundamental Right of Medical Necessity and Genetic Intervention for Substance Abuse.William Kitchin - 2006 - Journal of Evolution and Technology 15 (1):1.
    Genetic intervention is on the near horizon for the treatment of substance abu se. Genetic intervention involves a reprogramming of a person’s own genetic instructions so that that person will no longer have the physical craving for the drug of choice. Unlike pharmacologic intervention, genetic intervention will change the genetic identity of the person, albeit slightly. The legal issue is whether one has a fundamental right to this medical procedure. A fundamental right is one that (...)
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  6.  10
    The Ends of Medical Intervention and the Demarcation of the Normal From the Pathological.Abraham Rudnick - 2000 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (5):569 – 580.
    This study examines the ends of medical intervention and argues that mainstream contemporary medicine assumes that appropriate ends may be discovered (i.e., naturalism), rather than created or decided upon (i.e., conventionalism). The essay then applies these considerations to the problem of the demarcation of the normal from the pathological. I argue that the common formulations of this dispute commit a fallacy, as they characterize the "normal" as a state of the organism and not as an ongoing process within (...)
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  7.  68
    Euthanasia and End-of-Life Practices in France and Germany. A Comparative Study.Ruth Horn - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (2):197-209.
    The objective of this paper is to understand from a sociological perspective how the moral question of euthanasia, framed as the “right to die”, emerges and is dealt with in society. It takes France and Germany as case studies, two countries in which euthanasia is prohibited and which have similar legislation on the issue. I presuppose that, and explore how, each society has its own specificities in terms of practical, social and political norms that affect the ways in which they (...)
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  8. An Analysis of the Structure of Justification of Ethical Decisions in Medical Intervention.Donnie J. Self - 1985 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 6 (3).
    The most important distinction in value theory is the subjective-objective distinction which determines the epistemological status of value judgments about medical intervention. Ethical decisions in medical intervention presuppose one of three structures of justification — namely, an inductive approach, a deductive approach which can be either consequentialist or non-consequentialist, and a uniquely ethical approach. Inductivism and deductivism have been discussed extensively in the literature and are only briefly described here. The uniquely ethical approach which presupposes value (...)
     
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  9.  10
    Feeding Versus Artificial Nutrition and Hydration: At the Boundaries of Medical Intervention and Social Interaction.Sara M. Bergstresser & Erick Castellanos - 2015 - Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 8 (2):204-225.
    In this article, we examine the emergence of a concept of medical feeding that emphasizes artificiality and medical technology. We discuss how this concept has been created in specific contrast to the daily provision of food and water; medical definitions retain clear disjunctures with cultural and religious beliefs surrounding food, gendered aspects of eating and feeding, and the everyday practices of social and family life in the United States. We begin with an examination of the historical processes (...)
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  10.  12
    Shaping Medical Students' Attitudes Toward Ethically Important Aspects of Clinical Research: Results of a Randomized, Controlled Educational Intervention.Laura Weiss Roberts, Teddy D. Warner, Laura B. Dunn, Janet L. Brody, Katherine A. Green Hammond & Brian B. Roberts - 2007 - Ethics and Behavior 17 (1):19-50.
    The effects of research ethics training on medical students' attitudes about clinical research are examined. A preliminary randomized controlled trial evaluated 2 didactic approaches to ethics training compared to a no-intervention control. The participant-oriented intervention emphasized subjective experiences of research participants. The criteria-oriented intervention emphasized specific ethical criteria for analyzing protocols. Compared to controls, those in the participant-oriented intervention group exhibited greater attunement to research participants' attitudes related to altruism, trust, quality of relationships with researchers, (...)
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  11.  20
    Shaping Medical Students' Attitudes Toward Ethically Important Aspects of Clinical Research: Results of a Randomized, Controlled Educational Intervention.Laura Weiss Roberts, Teddy D. Warner, Laura B. Dunn, Janet L. Brody, Katherine Green Hammond & Brian B. Roberts - 2007 - Ethics and Behavior 17 (1):19 – 50.
    The effects of research ethics training on medical students' attitudes about clinical research are examined. A preliminary randomized controlled trial evaluated 2 didactic approaches to ethics training compared to a no-intervention control. The participant-oriented intervention emphasized subjective experiences of research participants (empathy focused). The criteria-oriented intervention emphasized specific ethical criteria for analyzing protocols (analytic focused). Compared to controls, those in the participant-oriented intervention group exhibited greater attunement to research participants' attitudes related to altruism, trust, quality (...)
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  12.  11
    The Limitation of Human Knowledge: Faith and the Empirical Method in John Wesley's Medical Holism.Deborah Madden - 2006 - History of European Ideas 32 (2):162-172.
    In his medical and scientific works John Wesley provided an interpretation of the universe that was structured, though not pre-ordained, by God. The empirical method he adopted was measured in terms of efficacy and judged according to rationalistic standards. Its practical success, however, was used by Wesley to underpin his vocation of practical piety, which developed out of a holistic view of nature inspired by the spiritualism of Primitive Christianity. Accordingly, the providential ordering of Man and nature meant that (...)
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  13.  10
    Is Healthcare Providers’ Value-Neutrality Depending on How Controversial a Medical Intervention Is? Analysis of 10 More or Less Controversial Interventions.Lynöe Niels, Björk Joar & Juth Niklas - 2017 - Clinical Ethics 12 (3):117-123.
    BackgroundSwedish healthcare providers are supposed to be value-neutral when making clinical decisions. Recent conducted studies among Swedish physicians have indicated that the proportion of those whose personal values influence decision-making vary depending on the framing and the nature of the issue.ObjectiveTo examine whether the proportions of value-influenced and value-neutral participants vary depending on the extent to which the intervention is considered controversial.MethodsTo discriminate between value-neutral and value-influenced healthcare providers, we have used the same methods in six vignette based studies (...)
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  14.  17
    In That Case: Necessary Limitation of Medical Treatment, Ageism, or Worse? A Policy Proposal for Limiting Kidney Dialysis Availability Over 75.Michael A. Ashby - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (2):171-172.
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  15.  13
    Jewish Views on the Beginnings of Human Life and the Use of Medical Intervention to Produce Children.John Loike, Ruth Fischbach & Moshe Tendler - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (11):45-47.
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  16.  3
    Limitation of Medical Care: An Ethnographic Analysis.W. Ventres, M. Nichter, R. Reed & R. Frankel - 1993 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 4 (2):134.
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  17. The Limited Effectiveness of Prestige as an Intervention on the Health of Medical Journal Publications.Carole J. Lee - 2013 - Episteme 10 (4):387-402.
    Under the traditional system of peer-reviewed publication, the degree of prestige conferred to authors by successful publication is tied to the degree of the intellectual rigor of its peer review process: ambitious scientists do well professionally by doing well epistemically. As a result, we should expect journal editors, in their dual role as epistemic evaluators and prestige-allocators, to have the power to motivate improved author behavior through the tightening of publication requirements. Contrary to this expectation, I will argue that the (...)
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  18.  9
    Effectiveness of a Medical Education Intervention to Treat Hypertension in Primary Care.Silvia Martínez-Valverde, Angélica Castro-Ríos, Ricardo Pérez-Cuevas, Miguel Klunder-Klunder, Guillermo Salinas-Escudero & Hortensia Reyes-Morales - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (2):420-425.
  19.  10
    Validity of the Manchester Triage System in Emergency Patients Receiving Life‐Saving Intervention or Acute Medical Treatment—A Prospective Observational Study in the Emergency Department.Ingo Gräff, Benjamin Latzel, Procula Glien, Rolf Fimmers & Ramona C. Dolscheid‐Pommerich - 2019 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 25 (3):398-403.
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  20.  75
    The Development of "Medical Futility": Towards a Procedural Approach Based on the Role of the Medical Profession.S. Moratti - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (6):369-372.
    Over the past 50 years, technical advances have taken place in medicine that have greatly increased the possibilities of life-prolonging intervention. The increased possibilities of intervening have brought along new ethical questions. Not everything that is technically possible is appropriate in a specific case: not everything that could be done should be done. In the 1980s, a new term was coined to indicate a class of inappropriate interventions: “medically futile treatment”. A debate followed, with contributions from the USA and (...)
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  21.  29
    Limitation of Treatment at the End of Life: An Empirical-Ethical Analysis Regarding the Practices of Physician Members of the German Society for Palliative Medicine.Jan Schildmann, Julia Hoetzel, Anne Baumann, Christof Mueller-Busch & Jochen Vollmann - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (6):327-332.
    Objectives To determine the frequencies and types of limitation of medical treatment performed by physician members of the German Society for Palliative Medicine and to analyse the findings with respect to clinical and ethical aspects of end-of-life practices. Design Cross-sectional postal survey. Setting Data collection via the secretary of the German Society for Palliative Medicine using the German language version of the EURELD survey instrument. Subjects All 1645 physician members of the German Society for Palliative Medicine. Main outcome (...)
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  22.  44
    A Case Study From the Perspective of Medical Ethics: Refusal of Treatment in an Ambulance.H. Erbay, S. Alan & S. Kadioglu - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (11):652-655.
    This paper will examine a sample case encountered by ambulance staff in the context of the basic principles of medical ethics.An accident takes place on an intercity highway. Ambulance staff pick up the injured driver and medical intervention is initiated. The driver suffers from a severe stomach ache, which is also affecting his back. Evaluating the patient, the ambulance doctor suspects that he might be experiencing internal bleeding. For this reason, venous access, in the doctor's opinion, should (...)
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  23.  97
    Criminal Rehabilitation Through Medical Intervention: Moral Liability and the Right to Bodily Integrity.Thomas Douglas - 2014 - The Journal of Ethics 18 (2):101-122.
    Criminal offenders are sometimes required, by the institutions of criminal justice, to undergo medical interventions intended to promote rehabilitation. Ethical debate regarding this practice has largely proceeded on the assumption that medical interventions may only permissibly be administered to criminal offenders with their consent. In this article I challenge this assumption by suggesting that committing a crime might render one morally liable to certain forms of medical intervention. I then consider whether it is possible to respond (...)
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  24. Effectiveness of Medical Interventions.Jacob Stegenga - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 54:34-44.
    To be effective, a medical intervention must improve one's health by targeting a disease. The concept of disease, though, is controversial. Among the leading accounts of disease-naturalism, normativism, hybridism, and eliminativism-I defend a version of hybridism. A hybrid account of disease holds that for a state to be a disease that state must both (i) have a constitutive causal basis and (ii) cause harm. The dual requirement of hybridism entails that a medical intervention, to be deemed (...)
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  25.  14
    Left of Bang Interventions in Trauma: Some Legal Implications of Military Medical Prophylaxis.Rain Liivoja - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (7):509-510.
    In the context of military medical care, Eisenstein and colleagues have introduced the notion ‘left of bang intervention in trauma’, which refers to interventions administered before trauma to reduce morbidity and mortality after injury. This paper responds to Eisenstein and colleagues’ ethical analysis of such interventions, highlighting the difficulty in distinguishing between purely prophylactic and enhancing interventions. This response also addresses legal issues that arise from left of bang interventions under human rights law and the law of armed (...)
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  26.  27
    Evaluating End of Life Practices in ten Brazilian Paediatric and Adult Intensive Care Units.J. Piva, P. Lago, J. Othero, P. C. Garcia, R. Fiori, H. Fiori, L. A. Borges & F. S. Dias - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (6):344-348.
    Objective To evaluate the modes of death and treatment offered in the last 24 h of life to patients dying in 10 Brazilian intensive care units (ICUs) over a period of 2 years. Design and setting Cross-sectional, multicentre, retrospective study based on medical chart review. The medical records of all patients that died in seven paediatric and three adult ICUs belonging to university and tertiary hospitals over a period of 2 years were included. Deaths in the first 24 (...)
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  27.  69
    A Randomized Trial of Ethics Education for Medical House Officers.D. P. Sulmasy, G. Geller, D. M. Levine & R. R. Faden - 1993 - Journal of Medical Ethics 19 (3):157-163.
    We report the results of a randomized trial to assess the impact of an innovative ethics curriculum on the knowledge and confidence of 85 medical house officers in a university hospital programme, as well as their responses to a simulated clinical case. Twenty-five per cent of the house officers received a lecture series, 25 per cent received lectures and case conferences, with an ethicist in attendance, and 50 per cent served as controls. A post-intervention questionnaire was administered. Knowledge (...)
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  28.  10
    Problems in Deceptive Medical Procedures: An Ethical and Legal Analysis of the Administration of Placebos.B. Simmons - 1978 - Journal of Medical Ethics 4 (4):172-181.
    The use of placebos in therapy or research poses ethical questions. What are the benefits and the costs in ethical terms of condoning deception of the patient or subject? What does the deception mean for the patient's or subject's right to give informed consent to his treatment? Doctors are rightly expected to disclose to their patient facts which would in their judgement best enable him to give informed consent to treatment. On occasion, the degree of this disclosure may be limited (...)
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  29.  59
    Medical Futility and the Death of a Child.Nancy S. Jecker - 2011 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (2):133-139.
    Our response to death may differ depending on the patient’s age. We may feel that death is a sad, but acceptable event in an elderly patient, yet feel that death in a very young patient is somehow unfair. This paper explores whether there is any ethical basis for our different responses. It examines in particular whether a patient’s age should be relevant to the determination that an intervention is medically futile. It also considers the responsibilities of health professionals and (...)
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  30.  90
    Justifications for Non-­Consensual Medical Intervention: From Infectious Disease Control to Criminal Rehabilitation.Jonathan Pugh & Thomas Douglas - 2016 - Criminal Justice Ethics 35 (3):205-229.
    A central tenet of medical ethics holds that it is permissible to perform a medical intervention on a competent individual only if that individual has given informed consent to the intervention. However, in some circumstances it is tempting to say that the moral reason to obtain informed consent prior to administering a medical intervention is outweighed. For example, if an individual’s refusal to undergo a medical intervention would lead to the transmission of (...)
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  31.  32
    The Humanising Power of Medical History: Responses to Biomedicine in the 20th Century United States.J. H. Warner - 2011 - Medical Humanities 37 (2):91-96.
    Most American historians of medicine today would be very hesitant about any claim that medical history humanises doctors, medical students or the larger health care enterprise. Yet, the idea that history can and ought to serve modern medicine as a humanising force has been a persistent refrain in American medicine. This essay explores the emergence of this idea from the end of the 19th century, precisely the moment when modern biomedicine became ascendant. At the same institutions where the (...)
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  32.  67
    Judging Medical Futility: An Ethical Analysis of Medical Power and Responsibility.Nancy S. Jecker & Lawrence J. Schneiderman - 1995 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (1):23.
    In situations where experience shows that a particular intervention will not benefit a patient, common sense seems to suggest that the intervention should not be used. Yet it is precisely in these situations that a peculiar ethic begins to operate, an ethic that Eddy calls “the criterion of potential benefit.” According to this ethic, “a treatment is appropriate if it might have some benefit.” Thus, the various maxims learned in medical school instruct physicians that “‘an error of (...)
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  33.  15
    Medical Students’ Opinions About the Commercialization of Healthcare: A Cross-Sectional Survey.M. Murat Civaner, Harun Balcioglu & Kevser Vatansever - 2016 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 13 (2):261-270.
    There are serious concerns about the commercialization of healthcare and adoption of the business approach in medicine. As market dynamics endanger established professional values, healthcare workers face more complicated ethical dilemmas in their daily practice. The aim of this study was to investigate the willingness of medical students to accept the assertions of commercialized healthcare and the factors affecting their level of agreement, factors which could influence their moral stance when market demands conflict with professional values. A cross-sectional study (...)
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  34.  19
    What Is the Relevance of Procedural Fairness to Making Determinations About Medical Evidence?Govind Persad - 2017 - AMA Journal of Ethics 19 (2):183-191.
    Approaches relying on fair procedures rather than substantive principles have been proposed for answering dilemmas in medical ethics and health policy. These dilemmas generally involve two questions: the epistemological (factual) question of which benefits an intervention will have, and the ethical (value) question of how to distribute those benefits. This article focuses on the potential of fair procedures to help address epistemological and factual questions in medicine, using the debate over antidepressant efficacy as a test case. In doing (...)
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  35.  36
    The Context of Ethical Problems in Medical Volunteer Work.Anji Wall - 2011 - HEC Forum 23 (2):79-90.
    Ethical problems are common in clinical medicine, so medical volunteers who practice clinical medicine in developing countries should expect to encounter them just as they would in their practice in the developed world. However, as this article argues, medical volunteers in developing countries should not expect to encounter the same ethical problems as those that dominate Western biomedicine or to address ethical problems in the same way as they do in their practice in developed countries. For example, poor (...)
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  36.  24
    Medical Students' Decisions About Authorship in Disputable Situations: Intervention Study.Darko Hren, Dario Sambunjak, Matko Marušić & Ana Marušić - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (2):641-651.
    In medicine, professional behavior and ethics are often rule-based. We assessed whether instruction on formal criteria of authorship affected the decision of students about authorship dilemmas and whether they perceive authorship as a conventional or moral concept. A prospective non-randomized intervention study involved 203s year medical students who did (n = 107) or did not (n = 96) received a lecture on International Committee of Medical Journal editors (ICMJE) authorship criteria. Both groups had to read 3 vignettes (...)
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  37.  26
    Limitation of the Diagnostic Effort in Paediatrics.C. M. Gonzalez - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (11):648-651.
    The principle objective of a diagnosis is not to categorise symptoms, or group a combination of signs or clinical symptoms in a coherent way, but to cure a patient or improve their quality of life. Diagnoses that are technically correct, but do not seek this objective may become unnecessary labels which convert healthy people, or those who do not consider themselves to be sick, into patients. We propose a limitation of the diagnostic effort in order to reduce the iatrogenic (...)
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  38.  2
    Theoretical basis of medical professionals' skill to evaluate statistical information.Arnaldo Espindola Artola & Evelio F. Machado Ramírez - 2016 - Humanidades Médicas 16 (3):489-503.
    Diversas investigaciones confirman que la evaluación de la información estadística constituye una limitante para el profesional de la Medicina. Incluso en ocasiones se tiende a posturas éticas y bioéticas inadecuadas que generan problemas para las ciencias médicas; y por ende, para la sociedad. Por esa razón, el objetivo del artículo consistió en fundamentar teóricamente la competencia evaluar información estadística para el profesional de la Medicina. Los resultados obtenidos evidencian la necesidad de concebir el proceso de evaluación de la información estadística (...)
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  39.  29
    Ethical Review of Global Short-Term Medical Volunteerism.Matthew DeCamp - 2011 - HEC Forum 23 (2):91-103.
    Global short-term medical volunteerism is growing, and properly conducted, is a tool in the fight for greater global health equity. It is intrinsically ethical (i.e., it involves ethics at every step) and depends upon ethical conduct for its success. At present, ethical guidelines remain in their infancy, which presents a unique opportunity. This paper presents a set of basic ethical principles, building on prior work in this area and previously developed guidelines for international clinical research. The content of these (...)
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  40.  54
    False Belief and the Refusal of Medical Treatment.R. Faden & A. Faden - 1977 - Journal of Medical Ethics 3 (3):133-136.
    May a doctor treat a patient, despite that patient's refusal, when in his professional opinion treatment is necessary? This is the dilemma which must from time to time confront most physicians. An examination of the validity of such a refusal is provided by the present authors who use the case history of a patient refusing treatment, for cancer as well as for a fractured hip, to evaluate the grounds for intervention in such circumstances. In such a situation the patient (...)
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  41.  13
    Identification of a Non-Linear Model as a New Method to Detect Expiratory Airflow Limitation in Mechanically Ventilated Patients.S. Khirani, L. Biot, P. Lavagne, A. Duguet, T. Similowski & P. Baconnier - 2004 - Acta Biotheoretica 52 (4):241-254.
    Expiratory flow limitation (EFL) can occur in mechanically ventilated patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and other disorders. It leads to dynamic hyperinflation with ensuing deleterious consequences. Detecting EFL is thus clinically relevant. Easily applicable methods however lack this detection being routinely made in intensive care. Using a simple mathematical model, we propose a new method to detect EFL that does not require any intervention or modification of the ongoing therapeutic. The model consists in a monoalveolar representation of (...)
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  42.  7
    Parents’ Attitudes Towards and Perceptions of Involving Minors in Medical Research From the Japanese Perspective.Yasue Fukuda & Koji Fukuda - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (1):91.
    Children’s intentions should be respected. Parents are the key persons involved in decision-making related to their children. In Japan, the appropriate ages and standards for a child’s consent and assent, approval, and decision-making are not clearly defined, which makes the process of obtaining consent and assent for clinical research complex. The purpose of this paper is as follows: to understand the attitudes and motives of parents concerning children’s participation in medical research and the factors influencing their decision-making. We also (...)
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  43.  20
    Exceptions to the Rule of Informed Consent for Research with an Intervention.Susanne Rebers, Neil K. Aaronson, Flora E. van Leeuwen & Marjanka K. Schmidt - 2016 - BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):1-11.
    BackgroundIn specific situations it may be necessary to make an exception to the general rule of informed consent for scientific research with an intervention. Earlier reviews only described subsets of arguments for exceptions to waive consent.MethodsHere, we provide a more extensive literature review of possible exceptions to the rule of informed consent and the accompanying arguments based on literature from 1997 onwards, using both Pubmed and PsycINFO in our search strategy.ResultsWe identified three main categories of arguments for the acceptability (...)
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  44.  14
    Beyond The Anticipatory Corpse: Medicine, Power, and the Care of the Dying: A Theoretical and Methodological Intervention Into the Sociology of Brain Implant Surgery.Black Hawk Hancock & Daniel R. Morrison - 2016 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 41 (6):659-678.
    Drawing on and extending the Foucaultian philosophical framework that Jeffrey Bishop develops in his masterful book, The Anticipatory Corpse: Medicine, Power, and the Care of the Dying, we undertake a sociological analysis of the neurological procedure—deep brain stimulation —which implants electrodes in the brain, powered by a pacemaker-like device, for the treatment of movement disorders. Following Bishop’s work, we carry out this analysis through a two-fold strategy. First, we examine how a multidisciplinary team evaluates candidates for this implant at a (...)
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  45.  35
    The Right to Bodily Integrity and the Rehabilitation of Offenders Through Medical Interventions: A Reply to Thomas Douglas.Elizabeth Shaw - 2019 - Neuroethics 12 (1):97-106.
    Medical interventions such as methadone treatment for drug addicts or “chemical castration” for sex offenders have been used in several jurisdictions alongside or as an alternative to traditional punishments, such as incarceration. As our understanding of the biological basis for human behaviour develops, our criminal justice system may make increasing use of such medical techniques and may become less reliant on incarceration. Academic debate on this topic has largely focused on whether offenders can validly consent to medical (...)
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  46.  9
    "Sharing the Impact of the Disease": A Workshop on Suffering for Medical Students.W. Lewis & K. Hawthorne - 2008 - Medical Humanities 34 (2):100-106.
    Objectives: To investigate the attitudes of early clinical students to the concept of suffering and the work of Eric Cassell. Design: Qualitative case study using group interviews and questionnaires. Setting: A United Kingdom medical school. Participants: Two whole-year cohorts of third-year medical students (n = 557). Interventions: Group interviews involving 57 randomly selected students, with exploration of emergent themes using free text and Lickert scale questionnaires. Results: Students engaged readily with the concept of suffering and were able to (...)
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  47.  57
    On the Aims of Medicine: Comments on 'Philosophy of Medicine as the Source for Medical Ethics'.Caroline Whitbeck - 1981 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 2 (1):35-41.
    Health defined as the psychophysiological capacity to act or respond appropriately in a wide variety of situations, is enhanced by many means other than preventing and treating disease and injury. Therefore no choice of a particular medical intervention is likely to maximize health for all people with (or at risk for) a given disease. As a result, if medical practitioners are to be fully competent in the sense of knowing not only how to perform procedures but when (...)
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  48.  18
    Medical Tourism in India: Perceptions of Physicians in Tertiary Care Hospitals.Imrana Qadeer & Sunita Reddy - 2013 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 8:20.
    Senior physicians of modern medicine in India play a key role in shaping policies and public opinion and institutional management. This paper explores their perceptions of medical tourism (MT) within India which is a complex process involving international demands and policy shifts from service to commercialisation of health care for trade, gross domestic profit, and foreign exchange. Through interviews of 91 physicians in tertiary care hospitals in three cities of India, this paper explores four areas of concern: their understanding (...)
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  49.  11
    Considerations for a Human Rights Impact Assessment of a Population Wide Treatment for HIV Prevention Intervention.Johanna Hanefeld, Virginia Bond, Janet Seeley, Shelley Lees & Nicola Desmond - 2015 - Developing World Bioethics 15 (3):115-124.
    Increasing attention is being paid to the potential of anti-retroviral treatment for HIV prevention. The possibility of eliminating HIV from a population through a universal test and treat intervention, where all people within a population are tested for HIV and all positive people immediately initiated on ART, as part of a wider prevention intervention, was first proposed in 2009. Several clinical trials testing this idea are now in inception phase. An intervention which relies on universally testing the (...)
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  50.  18
    An Intervention to Improve Cancer Patients' Understanding of Early-Phase Clinical Trials.Nancy E. Kass, Jeremy Sugarman, Amy M. Medley, Linda A. Fogarty, Holly A. Taylor, Christopher K. Daugherty, Mark R. Emerson, Steven N. Goodman, Fay J. Hlubocky & Herbert I. Hurwitz - 2009 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 31 (3):1.
    Participants in clinical research sometimes view participation as therapy or exaggerate potential benefits, especially in phase I or phase II trials. We conducted this study to discover what methods might improve cancer patients’ understanding of early-phase clinical trials. We randomly assigned 130 cancer patients from three U.S. medical centers who were considering enrollment in a phase I or phase II cancer trial to receive either a multimedia intervention or a National Cancer Institute pamphlet explaining the trial and its (...)
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