9 found
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  1.  25
    An Ethics Framework for Making Resource Allocation Decisions Within Clinical Care: Responding to COVID-19.Angus Dawson, David Isaacs, Melanie Jansen, Christopher Jordens, Ian Kerridge, Ulrik Kihlbom, Henry Kilham, Anne Preisz, Linda Sheahan & George Skowronski - 2020 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 17 (4):749-755.
    On March, 24, 2020, 818 cases of COVID-19 had been reported in New South Wales, Australia, and new cases were increasing at an exponential rate. In anticipation of resource constraints arising in clinical settings as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, a working party of ten ethicists was convened at the University of Sydney to draft an ethics framework to support resource allocation decisions. The framework guides decision-makers using a question-and-answer format, in language that avoids philosophical and medical technicality. The (...)
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  2.  27
    Re-defining moral distress: A systematic review and critical re-appraisal of the argument-based bioethics literature.Christine Sanderson, Linda Sheahan, Slavica Kochovska, Tim Luckett, Deborah Parker, Phyllis Butow & Meera Agar - 2019 - Clinical Ethics 14 (4):195-210.
    The concept of moral distress comes from nursing ethics, and was initially defined as ‘…when one knows the right thing to do, but institutional constraints make it nearly impossible to pursue the right course of action’. There is a large body of literature associated with moral distress, yet multiple definitions now exist, significantly limiting its usefulness. We undertook a systematic review of the argument-based bioethics literature on this topic as the basis for a critical appraisal, identifying 55 papers for analysis. (...)
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  3.  10
    Understanding Ethical and Legal Obligations in a Pandemic: A Taxonomy of “Duty” for Health Practitioners.Linda Sheahan & Scott Lamont - 2020 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 17 (4):697-701.
    From the ethics perspective, “duty of care” is a difficult and contested term, fraught with misconceptions and apparent misappropriations. However, it is a term that clinicians use frequently as they navigate COVID-19, somehow core to their understanding of themselves and their obligations, but with uncertainty as to how to translate or operationalize this in the context of a pandemic. This paper explores the “duty of care” from a legal perspective, distinguishes it from broader notions of duty on professional and personal (...)
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  4.  12
    What Matters? Palliative Care, Ethics, and the COVID-19 Pandemic.Linda Sheahan & Frank Brennan - 2020 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 17 (4):793-796.
    As is often the case in clinical ethics, the discourse in COVID-19 has focused primarily on difficult and controversial decision-making junctures such as how to decide who gets access to intensive care resources if demand outstrips supply. However, the lived experience of COVID-19 raises less controversial but arguably more profound moral questions around what it means to look after each other through the course of the pandemic and how this translates in care for the dying. This piece explores the interface (...)
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  5.  10
    On Wilkinson: unpacking Parfit, paternalism and the primacy of autonomy in contemporary bioethics.Linda Sheahan & Louise Campbell - 2023 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (6):415-416.
    In his essay on paternalism and personal identity, Wilkinson draws on Derek Parfit’s Reasons and Persons (1984) to call for a reappraisal of the role of paternalism in healthcare decision-making in situations in which patients with capacity make decisions which are likely to have harmful consequences for themselves.1 The imperative to respect autonomy, coupled with JS Mill’s insistence that the state is justified in interfering with an individual’s liberty only in situations in which she harms or threatens to harm another (...)
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  6.  18
    A Canadian Perspective on a Child’s Consent to Research within a Context of Family-Centered Care: From Incompatibility to Synergy.Linda Sheahan & Michael Da Silva - 2012 - Journal of Clinical Research and Bioethics 3 (1).
  7.  21
    A scoping review of the perceptions of death in the context of organ donation and transplantation.Ian Kerridge, Cameron Stewart, Linda Sheahan, Lisa O’Reilly, Michael J. O’Leary, Cynthia Forlini, Dianne Walton-Sonda, Anil Ramnani & George Skowronski - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-20.
    BackgroundSocio-cultural perceptions surrounding death have profoundly changed since the 1950s with development of modern intensive care and progress in solid organ transplantation. Despite broad support for organ transplantation, many fundamental concepts and practices including brain death, organ donation after circulatory death, and some antemortem interventions to prepare for transplantation continue to be challenged. Attitudes toward the ethical issues surrounding death and organ donation may influence support for and participation in organ donation but differences between and among diverse populations have not (...)
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  8.  3
    Ethics Consultation Services as a Resource and its Implications for Evaluation Activities.Narcyz Ghinea, Linda Sheahan & Ian Kerridge - 2022 - American Journal of Bioethics 22 (4):59-60.
    Effective evaluation of any activity requires, first, that we understand what its objectives are, and second, that we can define and measure these objectives. For instance, a publicly listed compan...
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  9.  5
    Raising the Dead? Limits of CPR and Harms of Defensive Practices.George Skowronski, Ian Kerridge, Edwina Light, Gemma McErlean, Cameron Stewart, Anne Preisz & Linda Sheahan - 2022 - Hastings Center Report 52 (6):8-12.
    We describe the case of an eighty‐four‐year‐old man with disseminated lung cancer who had been receiving palliative care in the hospital and was found by nursing staff unresponsive, with clinically obvious signs of death, including rigor mortis. Because there was no documentation to the contrary, the nurses commenced cardiopulmonary resuscitation and called a code blue, resulting in resuscitative efforts that continued for around twenty minutes. In discussion with the hospital ethicist, senior nurses justified these actions, mainly citing disciplinary and medicolegal (...)
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