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  1.  6
    Reasons Doctors Provide Futile Treatment at the End of Life: A Qualitative Study.Lindy Willmott, Benjamin White, Cindy Gallois, Malcolm Parker, Nicholas Graves, Sarah Winch, Leonie Kaye Callaway, Nicole Shepherd & Eliana Close - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (8):496-503.
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  2.  22
    Law as Clinical Evidence: A New ConstitutiveModel of Medical Education and Decision-Making.Malcolm Parker, Lindy Willmott, Ben White, Gail Williams & Colleen Cartwright - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (1):101-109.
    Over several decades, ethics and law have been applied to medical education and practice in a way that reflects the continuation during the twentieth century of the strong distinction between facts and values. We explain the development of applied ethics and applied medical law and report selected results that reflect this applied model from an empirical project examining doctors’ decisions on withdrawing/withholding treatment from patients who lack decision-making capacity. The model is critiqued, and an alternative “constitutive” model is supported on (...)
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  3.  14
    Doctors’ Perceptions of How Resource Limitations Relate to Futility in End-of-Life Decision Making: A Qualitative Analysis.Eliana Close, Ben P. White, Lindy Willmott, Cindy Gallois, Malcolm Parker, Nicholas Graves & Sarah Winch - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (6):373-379.
    ObjectiveTo increase knowledge of how doctors perceive futile treatments and scarcity of resources at the end of life. In particular, their perceptions about whether and how resource limitations influence end-of-life decision making. This study builds on previous work that found some doctors include resource limitations in their understanding of the concept of futility.SettingThree tertiary hospitals in metropolitan Brisbane, Australia.DesignQualitative study using in-depth, semistructured, face-to-face interviews. Ninety-six doctors were interviewed in 11 medical specialties. Transcripts of the interviews were analysed using thematic (...)
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  4.  11
    Persistent Vegetative State and Minimally Conscious State: Ethical, Legal and Practical Dilemmas.Lindy Willmott & Ben White - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (7):425-426.
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  5.  7
    The Role of Law in Decisions to Withhold and Withdraw Life-Sustaining Treatment From Adults Who Lack Capacity: A Cross-Sectional Study.Benjamin P. White, Lindy Willmott, Gail Williams, Colleen Cartwright & Malcolm Parker - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (5):327-333.
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  6.  13
    Charlie Gard: In Defence of the Law.Eliana Close, Lindy Willmott & Benjamin P. White - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (7):476-480.
    Much of the commentary in the wake of the Charlie Gard litigation was aimed at apparent shortcomings of the law. These include concerns about the perceived inability of the law to consider resourcing issues, the vagueness of the best interests test and the delays and costs of having disputes about potentially life-sustaining medical treatment resolved by the courts. These concerns are perennial ones that arise in response to difficult cases. Despite their persistence, we argue that many of these criticisms are (...)
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