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Lisa Geraci [12]Lisa D. Geraci [1]
  1.  28
    On the Validity of Remember–Know Judgments: Evidence From Think Aloud Protocols.David P. McCabe, Lisa Geraci, Jeffrey K. Boman, Amanda E. Sensenig & Matthew G. Rhodes - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1625-1633.
    The use of remember–know judgments to assess subjective experience associated with memory retrieval, or as measures of recollection and familiarity processes, has been controversial. In the current study we had participants think aloud during study and provide verbal reports at test for remember–know and confidence judgments. Results indicated that the vast majority of remember judgments for studied items were associated with recollection from study , but this correspondence was less likely for high-confidence judgments . Instead, high-confidence judgments were more likely (...)
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  2.  29
    On Interpreting the Relationship Between Remember–Know Judgments and Confidence: The Role of Instructions☆.Lisa Geraci, David P. McCabe & Jimmeka J. Guillory - 2009 - Consciousness and Cognition 18 (3):701-709.
    Two experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that the nature of the remember–know instructions given to participants influences whether these responses reflect different memory states or different degrees of memory confidence. Participants studied words and nonwords, a variable that has been shown to dissociate confidence from remember–know judgments and were given a set of published remember–know instructions that either emphasized know judgments as highly confident or as less confident states of recognition. Experiment 1 replicated the standard finding showing that (...)
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  3.  31
    The Influence of Instructions and Terminology on the Accuracy of Remember–Know Judgments.David P. McCabe & Lisa D. Geraci - 2009 - Consciousness and Cognition 18 (2):401-413.
    The remember–know paradigm is one of the most widely used procedures to examine the subjective experience associated with memory retrieval. We examined how the terminology and instructions used to describe the experiences of remembering and knowing affected remember–know judgments. In Experiment 1 we found that using neutral terms, i.e., Type A memory and Type B memory, to describe the experiences of remembering and knowing reduced remember false alarms for younger and older adults as compared to using the terms Remember and (...)
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  4.  9
    Improving Metacognitive Accuracy: How Failing to Retrieve Practice Items Reduces Overconfidence.Tyler M. Miller & Lisa Geraci - 2014 - Consciousness and Cognition 29:131-140.
  5.  7
    The Influence of Retrieval Practice on Metacognition: The Contribution of Analytic and Non-Analytic Processes.Tyler M. Miller & Lisa Geraci - 2016 - Consciousness and Cognition 42:41-50.
  6.  16
    The Distinctiveness Effect in the Absence of Conscious Recollection: Evidence From Conceptual Priming.Lisa Geraci & Suparna Rajaram - 2004 - Journal of Memory and Language 51 (2):217-230.
  7.  15
    Aging and Implicit Memory: Examining the Contribution of Test Awareness.Lisa Geraci & Terrence M. Barnhardt - 2010 - Consciousness and Cognition 19 (2):606-616.
    The study examined whether test awareness contributes to age effects in priming. Younger and older adults were given two priming tests . Awareness was assessed using both a standard post-test questionnaire and an on-line measure. Results from the on-line awareness condition showed that, relative to older adults, younger adults showed higher levels of priming and awareness, and a stronger relationship between the two, suggesting that awareness could account for age differences in priming. In contrast, in the post-test questionnaire condition, there (...)
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  8. Three Forms of Consciousness in Retrieving Memories.Henry L. Roediger, Suparna Rajaram & Lisa Geraci - 2007 - In Philip David Zelazo, Morris Moscovitch & Evan Thompson (eds.), Cambridge Handbook of Consciousness. Cambridge University Press. pp. 251-287.
  9. Three Forms of Consciousness in Retrieving Memories.Iii Roediger, Henry L., Suparna Rajaram & Lisa Geraci - 2007 - In Zelazo, Philip David; Moscovitch, Morris; Thompson, Evan (2007). The Cambridge Handbook of Consciousness. (Pp. 251-287). New York, Ny, Us: Cambridge University Press. Xiv, 981 Pp.
  10.  9
    Metacognition in the Classroom: The Association Between Students’ Exam Predictions and Their Desired Grades.Gabriel D. Saenz, Lisa Geraci, Tyler M. Miller & Robert Tirso - 2017 - Consciousness and Cognition 51:125-139.
  11. Three Forms of Consciousness in Retrieving Memories.Henry L. Roediger Iii, Suparna Rajaram & Lisa Geraci - 2007 - In Philip David Zelazo, Morris Moscovitch & Evan Thompson (eds.), Cambridge Handbook of Consciousness. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  12. Zelazo, Philip David; Moscovitch, Morris; Thompson, Evan (2007). The Cambridge Handbook of Consciousness. (Pp. 251-287). New York, NY, US: Cambridge University Press. Xiv, 981 Pp. [REVIEW]Iii Roediger, Henry L., Suparna Rajaram & Lisa Geraci - 2007
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