Results for 'Lise Wilkinson'

953 found
Order:
  1.  15
    Burgeoning Visions of Global Public Health: The Rockefeller Foundation, The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and the ‘Hookworm Connection’.Lise Wilkinson - 2000 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 31 (3):397-407.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  85
    Against Dworkin's Endorsement Constraint: T. M. Wilkinson.T. M. Wilkinson - 2003 - Utilitas 15 (2):175-193.
    Ronald Dworkin argues on the basis of a theory of well-being that critical paternalism is self-defeating. People must endorse their lives if they are to benefit. This is the endorsement constraint and this paper rejects it. For certain kinds of important mistakes that people can make in their lives, the endorsement constraint is either incredible or too narrow to rule out as much paternalism as Dworkin wants. The endorsement constraint cannot be interpreted to give sensible judgements when people change their (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  3.  14
    Lise Wilkinson;, Anne Hardy. Prevention and Cure: The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine: A Twentieth‐Century Quest for Global Public Health. Vi + 436 Pp., Figs., Illus., App., Table, Index. London: Kegan Paul, 2001. [REVIEW]Mark Harrison - 2004 - Isis 95 (2):318-319.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  12
    An Introduction to the History of VirologyA. P. Waterson Lise Wilkinson.Donald M. McLean - 1980 - Isis 71 (2):328-329.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  12
    An Introduction to the History of Virology By A. P. Waterson and Lise Wilkinson.E. D. Garber - 1980 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 23 (2-1):317-318.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  39
    Ethics and the Acquisition of Organs.T. M. Wilkinson - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    Transplantation is a medically successful and cost-effective way to treat people whose organs have failed--but not enough organs are available to meet demand. T. M. Wilkinson explores the major ethical problems raised by policies for acquiring organs. Key topics include the rights of the dead, the role of the family, and the sale of organs.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  7. Bodies for Sale: Ethics and Exploitation in the Human Body Trade.Stephen Wilkinson - 2003 - Routledge.
    _Bodies for Sale: Ethics and Exploitation in the Human Body Trade _explores the philosophical and practical issues raised by activities such as surrogacy and organ trafficking. Stephen Wilkinson asks what is it that makes some commercial uses of the body controversial, whether the arguments against commercial exploitation stand up, and whether legislation outlawing such practices is really justified. In Part One Wilkinson explains and analyses some of the notoriously slippery concepts used in the body commodification debate, including exploitation, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  8. Choosing Tomorrow's Children: The Ethics of Selective Reproduction.Stephen Wilkinson - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    To what extent should parents be allowed to use reproductive technologies to determine the characteristics of their future children? Is there something morally wrong with choosing what their sex will be, or with trying to 'screen out' as much disease and disability as possible before birth? Stephen Wilkinson offers answers to such questions.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  9.  19
    Enhancing Debate About the Sexes.Dominic Wilkinson - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (12):721-721.
    Dr Dominic Wilkinson, Department of Neonatal Medicine, University of Adelaide, 72 King William Rd, North Adelaide, South Australia 5006, Australia; dominic.wilkinson@adelaide.edu.au, domjcw@gmail.comIs it good for there to be both males and females of our species? This question seems highly fanciful, and a long way from the ethical questions that health professionals face on a daily basis. However, philosophical thought experiments like this sometimes help to clarify questions that are of much broader relevance. In this case, the prospect of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  15
    Hegel and Aristotle (Review). [REVIEW]James H. Wilkinson - 2002 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 40 (4):550-551.
    James H. Wilkinson - Hegel and Aristotle - Journal of the History of Philosophy 40:4 Journal of the History of Philosophy 40.4 550-551 Book Review Hegel and Aristotle Alfredo Ferrarin. Hegel and Aristotle. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2001. Pp. xxii + 442. Cloth, $64.95. This is an important book which should be read by anyone interested in either of the two philosophers. Ferrarin demonstrates that the structure and detail of Hegel's executed project owe more to Aristotle than to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  15
    Burning Straw Men Sheds Little Light: A Reply to Whiting and Kelly.Mark Wilkinson - 1997 - Acta Biotheoretica 45 (1):17-27.
    Wilkinson (1991a) developed arguments that the distributions of primitive character states may delimit clades, and proposed a method that exploited the evidence of primitive character state distributions for inferring clades. Whiting and Kelly (1995) presented a critique of these ideas, arguing that they are logically incoherent and that the method does not succeed in its aims. This critique severely misrepresents the original arguments and the method, and amounts to no more than an attack on a straw man.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  43
    Minds and Bodies: An Introduction with Readings.Robert Wilkinson (ed.) - 2000 - New York: Routledge.
    Written with the beginner in mind, Robert Wilkinson carefully introduces the reader to the fundamental components of the philosophy of mind. Each chapter is then helpfully linked to a reading from key thinkers in the field such as Descartes and John R. Searle.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Minds and Bodies: An Introduction with Readings.Robert Wilkinson - 2013 - Routledge.
    _Minds and Bodies_ is a clear introduction to the mind-body problem. It requires no prior philosophical knowledge and is ideally suited to newcomers to philosophy and philosophy of mind. Robert Wilkinson carefully introduces the fundamental components of the philosophy of mind: Descartes's dualist account of mind and body; monist views including eliminativism; computer science and artificial intelligence. Each chapter is linked to a reading from key thinkers in the field, from Descartes to Paul Churchland.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  13
    Withdrawal Aversion and the Equivalence Test.Julian Savulescu, Ella Butcherine & Dominic Wilkinson - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (3):21-28.
    If a doctor is trying to decide whether or not to provide a medical treatment, does it matter ethically whether that treatment has already been started? Health professionals sometimes find it harder to stop a treatment than to refrain from starting the treatment. But does that feeling correspond to an ethical difference? In this article, we defend equivalence—the view that withholding and withdrawal of treatment are ethically equivalent when all other factors are equal. We argue that preference for withholding over (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  15.  5
    Worth Living or Worth Dying? The Views of the General Public About Allowing Disabled Children to Die.Claudia Brick, Guy Kahane, Dominic Wilkinson, Lucius Caviola & Julian Savulescu - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (1):7-15.
    Background Decisions about withdrawal of life support for infants have given rise to legal battles between physicians and parents creating intense media attention. It is unclear how we should evaluate when life is no longer worth living for an infant. Public attitudes towards treatment withdrawal and the role of parents in situations of disagreement have not previously been assessed. Methods An online survey was conducted with a sample of the UK public to assess public views about the benefit of life (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  16.  5
    Moral Uncertainty and the Farming of Human-Pig Chimeras.Julian Koplin & Dominic Wilkinson - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (7):440-446.
    It may soon be possible to generate human organs inside of human-pig chimeras via a process called interspecies blastocyst complementation. This paper discusses what arguably the central ethical concern is raised by this potential source of transplantable organs: that farming human-pig chimeras for their organs risks perpetrating a serious moral wrong because the moral status of human-pig chimeras is uncertain, and potentially significant. Those who raise this concern usually take it to be unique to the creation of chimeric animals with (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  17. The New Rhetoric: A Treatise on Argumentation.Ch Perelman, L. Olbrechts-Tyteca, John Wilkinson & Purcell Weaver - 1969 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 3 (4):249-254.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   177 citations  
  18. The Impact of Inequality.Richard G. Wilkinson - 2006 - Social Research: An International Quarterly 73 (2):711-732.
    Why do people in more unequal societies have worse health and shorter lives than those in less unequal ones? Why do more unequal societies tend to have more violence and weaker community life? This paper discusses the research evidence on the psychosocial pathways which suggest how and why we are affected by inequality.How big income differences are in any society seems to serve as an indicator of the scale of social differentiation and social distances within it. The evidence shows that (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  19.  24
    Mitochondrial Replacement: Ethics and Identity.Anthony Wrigley, Stephen Wilkinson & John B. Appleby - 2015 - Bioethics 29 (9):631-638.
    Mitochondrial replacement techniques have the potential to allow prospective parents who are at risk of passing on debilitating or even life-threatening mitochondrial disorders to have healthy children to whom they are genetically related. Ethical concerns have however been raised about these techniques. This article focuses on one aspect of the ethical debate, the question of whether there is any moral difference between the two types of MRT proposed: Pronuclear Transfer and Maternal Spindle Transfer. It examines how questions of identity impact (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  20.  54
    Bayesing Qualia: Consciousness as Inference, Not Raw Datum.A. Clark, K. Friston & S. Wilkinson - 2019 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 26 (9-10):19-33.
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  28
    Harm Isn't All You Need: Parental Discretion and Medical Decisions for a Child: Table 1.Dominic Wilkinson & Tara Nair - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (2):116-118.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  22.  49
    Hard Lessons: Learning From the Charlie Gard Case.Dominic Wilkinson & Julian Savulescu - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (7):438-442.
    On 24 July 2017, the long-running, deeply tragic and emotionally fraught case of Charlie Gard reached its sad conclusion. Following further medical assessment of the infant, Charlie’s parents and doctors finally reached agreement that continuing medical treatment was not in Charlie’s best interests. Life support was subsequently withdrawn and Charlie died on 28 July 2017.Box 1 ### Case summary and timeline21–23 Charlie Gard was born at full term, apparently healthy, in August 2016. At a few weeks of age his parents (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  23.  98
    Quantifiers in Comparatives: A Semantics of Degree Based on Intervals. [REVIEW]Roger Schwarzschild & Karina Wilkinson - 2002 - Natural Language Semantics 10 (1):1-41.
    The sentence Irving was closer to me than he was to most of the others contains a quantifier, most of the other, in the scope a comparative. The first part of this paper explains the challenges presented by such cases to existing approaches to the semantics of the comparative. The second part presents a new analysis of comparatives based on intervals rather than points on a scale. This innovation is analogized to the move from moments to intervals in tense semantics. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   46 citations  
  24.  55
    A Life Worth Giving? The Threshold for Permissible Withdrawal of Life Support From Disabled Newborn Infants.Dominic James Wilkinson - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (2):20 - 32.
    When is it permissible to allow a newborn infant to die on the basis of their future quality of life? The prevailing official view is that treatment may be withdrawn only if the burdens in an infant's future life outweigh the benefits. In this paper I outline and defend an alternative view. On the Threshold View, treatment may be withdrawn from infants if their future well-being is below a threshold that is close to, but above the zero-point of well-being. I (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  25. Should We Allow Organ Donation Euthanasia? Alternatives for Maximizing the Number and Quality of Organs for Transplantation.Dominic Wilkinson & Julian Savulescu - 2012 - Bioethics 26 (1):32-48.
    There are not enough solid organs available to meet the needs of patients with organ failure. Thousands of patients every year die on the waiting lists for transplantation. Yet there is one currently available, underutilized, potential source of organs. Many patients die in intensive care following withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment whose organs could be used to save the lives of others. At present the majority of these organs go to waste.In this paper we consider and evaluate a range of ways (...)
    Direct download (14 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  26.  15
    The Varieties of Inner Speech Questionnaire – Revised : Replicating and Refining Links Between Inner Speech and Psychopathology.Ben Alderson-Day, Kaja Mitrenga, Sam Wilkinson, Simon McCarthy-Jones & Charles Fernyhough - 2018 - Consciousness and Cognition 65:48-58.
  27. A Costly Separation Between Withdrawing and Withholding Treatment in Intensive Care.Dominic Wilkinson & Julian Savulescu - 2014 - Bioethics 28 (3):127-137.
    Ethical analyses, professional guidelines and legal decisions support the equivalence thesis for life-sustaining treatment: if it is ethical to withhold treatment, it would be ethical to withdraw the same treatment. In this paper we explore reasons why the majority of medical professionals disagree with the conclusions of ethical analysis. Resource allocation is considered by clinicians to be a legitimate reason to withhold but not to withdraw intensive care treatment. We analyse five arguments in favour of non-equivalence, and find only relatively (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  28.  18
    The Representation of Agents in Auditory Verbal Hallucinations.Sam Wilkinson & Vaughan Bell - 2016 - Mind and Language 31 (1):104-126.
    Current models of auditory verbal hallucinations tend to focus on the mechanisms underlying their occurrence, but often fail to address the content of the auditory experience. In other words, they tend to ask why there are AVHs at all, instead of asking why, given that there are AVHs, they have the properties that they have. One such property, which has been largely overlooked and which we will focus on here, is why the voices are often experienced as coming from agents, (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  29.  31
    Inducement in Research.Martin Wilkinson & Andrew Moore - 1997 - Bioethics 11 (5):373-389.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   41 citations  
  30.  3
    Bodies for Sale: Ethics and Exploitation in the Human Body Trade.Stephen Wilkinson - 2005 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 8 (5):579-581.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  31.  14
    The Relational Threshold: A Life That is Valued, or a Life of Value?Dominic Wilkinson, Claudia Brick, Guy Kahane & Julian Savulescu - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (1):24-25.
    The four thoughtful commentaries on our feature article draw out interesting empirical and normative questions. The aim of our study was to examine the views of a sample of the general public about a set of cases of disputed treatment for severely impaired infants.1 We compared those views with legal determinations that treatment was or was not in the infants’ best interests, and with some published ethical frameworks for decisions. We deliberately did not draw explicit ethical conclusions from our survey (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  50
    Gift Giving, Guanxi and Illicit Payments in Buyer–Supplier Relations in China: Analysing the Experience of UK Companies.Andrew Millington, Markus Eberhardt & Barry Wilkinson - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 57 (3):255-268.
    . This paper explores the relationship between gift giving, guanxi and corruption through a study of the relationships between UK manufacturing companies in China and their local component suppliers. The analysis is based on interviews in the China-based operations of 49 UK companies. Interviews were carried out both with senior (often expatriate) staff and with local line managers who were responsible for everyday purchasing decisions and for managing relationships with suppliers. The results suggest that gift giving is perceived to be (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  33.  58
    In Favour of Medical Dissensus: Why We Should Agree to Disagree About End‐of‐Life Decisions.Dominic Wilkinson, Robert Truog & Julian Savulescu - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (2):109-118.
    End-of-life decision-making is controversial. There are different views about when it is appropriate to limit life-sustaining treatment, and about what palliative options are permissible. One approach to decisions of this nature sees consensus as crucial. Decisions to limit treatment are made only if all or a majority of caregivers agree. We argue, however, that it is a mistake to require professional consensus in end-of-life decisions. In the first part of the article we explore practical, ethical, and legal factors that support (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  34.  33
    Functional Neuroimaging and Withdrawal of Life-Sustaining Treatment From Vegetative Patients.D. J. Wilkinson, G. Kahane, M. Horne & J. Savulescu - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (8):508-511.
    Recent studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging of patients in a vegetative state have raised the possibility that such patients retain some degree of consciousness. In this paper, the ethical implications of such findings are outlined, in particular in relation to decisions about withdrawing life-sustaining treatment. It is sometimes assumed that if there is evidence of consciousness, treatment should not be withdrawn. But, paradoxically, the discovery of consciousness in very severely brain-damaged patients may provide more reason to let them die. (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  35. A Window on the Normal Development of Sensitivity to Global Form in Glass Patterns.Terri L. LewisÙΩ, Dave Ellemberg, Daphne MaurerÙ, Melanie Dirks, Fran Wilkinson & Hugh R. Wilson - 2004 - In Robert Schwartz (ed.), Perception. Malden Ma: Blackwell. pp. 409-418.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  37
    Death or Disability?: The 'Carmentis Machine' and Decision-Making for Critically Ill Children.Dominic Wilkinson - 2013 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Death and grief in the ancient world -- Predictions and disability in Rome.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  37.  16
    Obesity, Equity and Choice.Timothy M. Wilkinson - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (5):323-328.
    Obesity is often considered a public health crisis in rich countries that might be alleviated by preventive regulations such as a sugar tax or limiting the density of fast food outlets. This paper evaluates these regulations from the point of view of equity. Obesity is in many countries correlated with socioeconomic status and some believe that preventive regulations would reduce inequity. The puzzle is this: how could policies that reduce the options of the badly off be more equitable? Suppose we (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  38.  33
    Philosophical Medical Ethics: More Necessary Than Ever.Julian Savulescu, Thomas Douglas & Dominic Wilkinson - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (7):434-435.
    When we applied for the editorship of the JME 7 years ago, we said that we considered the JME to be the most important journal in medicine. The most profound questions that health professionals face are not scientific or technical, but ethical. Our enormous scientific and medical progress already outstrips our capability to provide treatment. Life can be prolonged at enormous cost, sometimes far beyond the point that the individual appears to be gaining a net benefit from that life. Science (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  39.  24
    Should Uterus Transplants Be Publicly Funded?Stephen Wilkinson & Nicola Jane Williams - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (9):559-565.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  40.  71
    Accounting for the Phenomenology and Varieties of Auditory Verbal Hallucination Within a Predictive Processing Framework.Sam Wilkinson - 2014 - Consciousness and Cognition 30:142-155.
    Two challenges that face popular self-monitoring theories (SMTs) of auditory verbal hallucination (AVH) are that they cannot account for the auditory phenomenology of AVHs and that they cannot account for their variety. In this paper I show that both challenges can be met by adopting a predictive processing framework (PPF), and by viewing AVHs as arising from abnormalities in predictive processing. I show how, within the PPF, both the auditory phenomenology of AVHs, and three subtypes of AVH, can be accounted (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  41. The Exploitation Argument Against Commercial Surrogacy.Stephen Wilkinson - 2003 - Bioethics 17 (2):169–187.
    It is argued that there are good reasons for believing that commercial surrogacy is often exploitative. However, even if we accept this, the exploitation argument for prohibiting (or otherwise legislatively discouraging) commercial surrogacy remains quite weak. One reason for this is that prohibition may well 'backfire' and lead to potential surrogates having to do other things that are more exploitative and/or more harmful than paid surrogacy. It is concluded, therefore, that those who oppose exploitation should concentrate on: (a) improving the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  42.  47
    Is It in the Best Interests of an Intellectually Disabled Infant to Die?D. Wilkinson - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (8):454-459.
    One of the most contentious ethical issues in the neonatal intensive care unit is the withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment from infants who may otherwise survive. In practice, one of the most important factors influencing this decision is the prediction that the infant will be severely intellectually disabled. Most professional guidelines suggest that decisions should be made on the basis of the best interests of the infant. It is, however, not clear how intellectual disability affects those interests. Why should intellectual disability (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  43.  7
    Commentary: Treating Ambiguity in the Clinical Context: Is What You Hear the Doctor Say What the Doctor Means?Vicki Xafis & Dominic Wilkinson - 2019 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 28 (3):422-432.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44.  40
    Inner Speech is Not so Simple: A Commentary on Cho & Wu.Peter Moseley & Sam Wilkinson - unknown
    We welcome Cho and Wu’s suggestion that the study of auditory verbal hallucinations could be improved by contrasting and testing more explanatory models. However, we have some worries both about their criticisms of inner speech-based self-monitoring models and whether their proposed spontaneous activation model is explanatory.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  45.  61
    Individual and Family Decisions About Organ Donation.T. M. Wilkinson - 2007 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (1):26–40.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  46.  22
    Settling for Second Best: When Should Doctors Agree to Parental Demands for Suboptimal Medical Treatment?Tara Nair, Julian Savulescu, Jim Everett, Ryan Tonkens & Dominic Wilkinson - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (12):831-840.
    Background Doctors sometimes encounter parents who object to prescribed treatment for their children, and request suboptimal substitutes be administered instead. Previous studies have focused on parental refusal of treatment and when this should be permitted, but the ethics of requests for suboptimal treatment has not been explored. Methods The paper consists of two parts: an empirical analysis and an ethical analysis. We performed an online survey with a sample of the general public to assess respondents’ thresholds for acceptable harm and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  47.  36
    Exploitation in International Paid Surrogacy Arrangements.Stephen Wilkinson - 2016 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 33 (2):125-145.
    Many critics have suggested that international paid surrogacy is exploitative. Taking such concerns as its starting point, this article asks: how defensible is the claim that international paid surrogacy is exploitative and what could be done to make it less exploitative? In the light of the answer to, how strong is the case for prohibiting it? Exploitation could in principle be dealt with by improving surrogates' pay and conditions. However, doing so may exacerbate problems with consent. Foremost amongst these is (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  48.  19
    Prenatal Screening, Reproductive Choice, and Public Health.Stephen Wilkinson - 2015 - Bioethics 29 (1):26-35.
    One widely held view of prenatal screening is that its foremost aim is, or should be, to enable reproductive choice; this is the Pure Choice view. The article critiques this position by comparing it with an alternative: Public Health Pluralism. It is argued that there are good reasons to prefer the latter, including the following. Public Health Pluralism does not, as is often supposed, render PNS more vulnerable to eugenics-objections. The Pure Choice view, if followed through to its logical conclusions, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  49.  16
    When Deaf Signers Read English: Do Written Words Activate Their Sign Translations?Jill P. Morford, Erin Wilkinson, Agnes Villwock, Pilar Piñar & Judith F. Kroll - 2011 - Cognition 118 (2):286-292.
  50.  65
    The Self-Fulfilling Prophecy in Intensive Care.Dominic Wilkinson - 2009 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (6):401-410.
    Predictions of poor prognosis for critically ill patients may become self-fulfilling if life-sustaining treatment or resuscitation is subsequently withheld on the basis of that prediction. This paper outlines the epistemic and normative problems raised by self-fulfilling prophecies (SFPs) in intensive care. Where predictions affect outcome, it can be extremely difficult to ascertain the mortality rate for patients if all treatment were provided. SFPs may lead to an increase in mortality for cohorts of patients predicted to have poor prognosis, they may (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
1 — 50 / 953