Results for 'Lloyd J. Miller'

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  1.  31
    Book Review Section 1. [REVIEW]Maralyn Blachowicz, Lloyd J. Miller, Ezri Atzmon, Brian J. Spittle, Fred C. Rankine, Abdelhady Elsayed Abdu, Stafford Kay, Edward B. Goellner, Jerome F. Megna, Ronald Mark & Robert S. Griffin - 1981 - Educational Studies 12 (1):85-98.
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  2.  7
    Book Review Section 1. [REVIEW]Philip G. Altbach, Hilda Calabro, Lloyd J. Miller, Janice Ann Beran, Harvey G. Neufeldt, John Martin Rich, Clinton R. Bunke, John L. Brickell, Glorianne M. Leck & J. J. Chambliss - 1979 - Educational Studies 10 (1):94-113.
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  3.  11
    The Hand of the Lord. A Reassessment of the "Ark Narrative" of I Samuel.Lloyd Bailey, Patrick D. Miller & J. J. Roberts - 1979 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 99 (3):471.
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  4.  23
    Cardiovascular disease and non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drug prescribing in the midst of evolving guidelines.Timothy T. Pham, Michael J. Miller, Donald L. Harrison, Ann E. Lloyd, Kimberly M. Crosby & Jeremy L. Johnson - 2013 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (6):1026-1034.
  5.  11
    Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries The Ethereal Aether. A History of Michelson-Morley-Miller Aether-Drift Experiments, 1880–1930. By Lloyd S. Swenson Jr Austin: University of Texas Press, 1972. Pp. xxii +361. £4.75. Nineteenth Century Aether Theories. By Kenneth F. Schaffner. Oxford: Pergamon Press, 1972. Pp. x + 278. £3.25. [REVIEW]J. O. Marsh - 1974 - British Journal for the History of Science 7 (1):96-97.
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  6.  1
    Colleges and Commitments.Lloyd J. Averill - 1971 - Philadelphia: Westminster Press.
    The nature and legitimacy of commitments. Objectivity vs. commitment, by H. Smith. Institutional commitment: a social scientist's view, by H. R. Davis. The sectarian nature of liberal education, by L. J. Averill. The identity of the Christian college, by W. W. Jellema.--Commitments and the dimensions of learning. Discursive truth and evangelical truth, by A. C. Outler. Natural order and transcendent order, by W. G. Pollard. Limited cognition and ultimate cognition, by R. W. Friedrichs. Academic teaching and human experience, by M. (...)
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  7.  2
    The Parameters of Military Ethics.Lloyd J. Matthews & Dale E. Brown (eds.) - 1989 - Pergamon-Brassey's International Defense Publishers.
    Essays omhandlende den etiske dimension i det militære liv.
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  8.  46
    Postmodern Public Administration: Toward Discourse.Charles J. Fox & Hugh T. Miller - 1995 - SAGE Publications.
    Charles J Fox and Hugh T Miller challenge current thinking about public policy and administration in the light of the postmodern condition. In this book existing and accepted theories such as public management doctrines, constitutionalism and communitarianism are rejected in favour of constructing a discourse theory of public administration. The book also provides an invaluable, thorough and clear review of the doctrines and philosophies that have to date dominated the field.
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  9. Miller contro Miller: una polemica.J. Miller & D. Miller - 1996 - Studi di Estetica 13:191-236.
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  10. Do the Folk Represent Time as Essentially Dynamical?Andrew J. Latham, Kristie Miller & James Norton - forthcoming - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy.
    Recent research (Latham, Miller and Norton, forthcoming) reveals that a majority of people represent actual time as dynamical. But do they, as suggested by McTaggart and Gödel, represent time as essentially dynamical? This paper distinguishes three interrelated questions. We ask (a) whether the folk representation of time is sensitive or insensitive: i.e., does what satisfies the folk representation of time in counterfactual worlds depend on what satisfies it actually—sensitive—or does is not depend on what satisfies it actually—insensitive, and (b) (...)
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  11. The community of self.J. Miller M. Mair - 1977 - In D. Bannister (ed.), New Perspectives in Personal Construct Theory. Academic Press. pp. 125--149.
     
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  12.  38
    J. Carlsen, P. Ørsted, J. E. Skydsgaard (edd.): Land Use in the Roman Empire. (Analecta Romana Instituti Danici, Supplement 22.) Pp. 190, ills. Rome: 'L' Erma' di Bretschneider, 1994. Paper. [REVIEW]J. A. Lloyd - 1997 - The Classical Review 47 (02):436-.
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  13.  14
    J. Carlsen, P. Ørsted, J. E. Skydsgaard : Land Use in the Roman Empire. Pp. 190, ills. Rome: ‘Ľ Erma’ di Bretschneider, 1994. Paper. [REVIEW]J. A. Lloyd - 1997 - The Classical Review 47 (2):436-436.
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  14.  10
    Lloyd J. W.. Foundations of logic programming. Symbolic computation. Artifical intelligence. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, and Tokyo, 1984, x + 124 pp. [REVIEW]John C. Shepherdson - 1987 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 52 (1):288-289.
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  15. Is our naïve theory of time dynamical?Andrew J. Latham, Kristie Miller & James Norton - 2021 - Synthese 198 (5):4251-4271.
    We investigated, experimentally, the contention that the folk view, or naïve theory, of time, amongst the population we investigated is dynamical. We found that amongst that population, ~ 70% have an extant theory of time that is more similar to a dynamical than a non-dynamical theory, and ~ 70% of those who deploy a naïve theory of time deploy a naïve theory that is more similar to a dynamical than a non-dynamical theory. Interestingly, while we found stable results across our (...)
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  16.  38
    Tripolitania D. J. Mattingly: Tripolitania. Pp. xix + 265, 89 figs, 39 plates. London: Batsford, 1995. Cased, £55. ISBN: 0-7134-5743-2. [REVIEW]J. A. Lloyd - 1997 - The Classical Review 47 (02):362-364.
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  17.  22
    Tripolitania - D. J. Mattingly: Tripolitania. Pp. xix + 265, 89 figs, 39 plates. London: Batsford, 1995. Cased, £55. ISBN: 0-7134-5743-2.J. A. Lloyd - 1997 - The Classical Review 47 (2):362-364.
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  18.  7
    American Fiction 1920-1940.Lloyd J. Reynolds - 1942 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 2 (5):68-69.
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  19.  6
    Rethinking Sexuality: Foucault and Classical Antiquity.David H. J. Larmour, Paul Allen Miller & Charles Platter - 2021 - Princeton University Press.
    In this collection of provocative essays, historians and literary theorists assess the influence of Michel Foucault, particularly his History of Sexuality, on the study of classics. Foucault's famous work presents a bold theory of sexuality for both ancient and modern times, and yet until now it has remained under-explored and insufficiently analyzed. By bringing together the historical knowledge, philological skills, and theoretical perspectives of a wide range of scholars, this collection enables the reader to explore Foucault's model of Greek culture (...)
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  20.  40
    On Scepticism About Personal Identity Thought Experiments.Andrew J. Latham, Kristie Miller, Caroline West & Wen Yu - forthcoming - Analytic Philosophy.
    Many philosophers have become sceptical of the use of thought experiments in theorising about personal identity. In large part this is due to work in experimental philosophy that appears to confirm long held philosophical suspicions that thought experiments elicit inconsistent judgements about personal identity, and hence judgements that are thought to be the product of cognitive biases. If so, these judgements appear to be useless at informing our theories of personal identity. Using the methods of experimental philosophy, we investigate whether (...)
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  21. There’s No Time Like the Present: Present-Bias, Temporal Attitudes and Temporal Ontology.Natalja Deng, Andrew J. Latham, Kristie Miller & James Norton - forthcoming - In Shaun Nichols & Joshua Knobe (eds.), Oxford Studies in Experimental Philosophy. OUP.
    This paper investigates the connection between temporal attitudes (attitudes characterised by a concern (or lack thereof) about future and past events), beliefs about temporal ontology (beliefs about the existence of future and past events) and temporal preferences (preferences regarding where in time events are located). Our aim is to probe the connection between these preferences, attitudes, and beliefs, in order to better evaluate the normative status of these preferences. We investigate the hypothesis that there is a three-way association between (a) (...)
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  22.  92
    Our Naïve Representation of Time and of the Open Future.Batoul Hodroj, Andrew J. Latham & Kristie Miller - forthcoming - Dialectica.
    It’s generally thought that we naively or pre-theoretically represent the future to be open. While philosophers have modelled future openness in different ways, it’s unclear which, if any, captures our naïve sense that the future is open. In this paper we focus on just one way the future might count as being open: by being nomically open, and empirically investigate whether our naïve representation of the future as open is partly constituted by representing the future as nomically open. We also (...)
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  23.  33
    Exploring Arbitrariness Objections to Time-Biases.Andrew J. Latham, Kristie Miller, Jordan Oh, Sam Shpall & W. E. N. Yu - manuscript
    There are two kinds of time-bias: near-bias and future-bias. While philosophers typically hold that near-bias is rationally impermissible, many hold that future-bias is rationally permissible. Call this normative hybridism. According to arbitrariness objections, certain patterns of preference are rationally impermissible because they are arbitrary. While arbitrariness objections have been levelled against both near-bias and future-bias, the kind of arbitrariness in question has been different. In this paper we investigate whether there are forms of arbitrariness that are common to both kinds (...)
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  24.  31
    Foundations of Logic Programming.J. W. Lloyd - 1987 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 52 (1):288-289.
  25. Hedonic and Non-Hedonic Bias toward the Future.Preston Greene, Andrew J. Latham, Kristie Miller & James Norton - 2021 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 99 (1):148-163.
    It has widely been assumed, by philosophers, that our first-person preferences regarding pleasurable and painful experiences exhibit a bias toward the future (positive and negative hedonic future-bias), and that our preferences regarding non-hedonic events (both positive and negative) exhibit no such bias (non-hedonic time-neutrality). Further, it has been assumed that our third-person preferences are always time-neutral. Some have attempted to use these (presumed) differential patterns of future-bias—different across kinds of events and perspectives—to argue for the irrationality of hedonic future-bias. This (...)
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  26.  50
    Pure and Impure Time Preferences.Andrew J. Latham, Kristie Miller & James Norton - forthcoming - Australasian Philosophical Review.
    This paper investigates two assumptions of the exponential discounted utility theory (EDU) to which Callender draws our attention: namely that we can cleanly distinguish pure from impure temporal preferences, and that past discounting can be ignored. Drawing on recent empirical work in this area, we argue that insofar as one might have thought that past-directed preferences are more pure than future ones, then there is evidence that people’s pure preferences (insofar as we can make sense of that notion) show more (...)
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  27. Future bias in action: does the past matter more when you can affect it?Andrew J. Latham, Kristie Miller, James Norton & Christian Tarsney - 2020 - Synthese 198 (12):11327-11349.
    Philosophers have long noted, and empirical psychology has lately confirmed, that most people are “biased toward the future”: we prefer to have positive experiences in the future, and negative experiences in the past. At least two explanations have been offered for this bias: belief in temporal passage and the practical irrelevance of the past resulting from our inability to influence past events. We set out to test the latter explanation. In a large survey, we find that participants exhibit significantly less (...)
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  28.  96
    Locating Temporal Passage in a Block World.Brigitte Everett, Andrew J. Latham & Kristie Miller - forthcoming - Ergo.
    This paper aims to determine whether we can locate temporal passage in a non-dynamical (block universe) world. In particular, we seek to determine both whether temporal passage can be located somewhere in our world if it is non-dynamical, and also to home in on where in such a world temporal passage can be located, if it can be located anywhere. We investigate this question by seeking to determine, across three experiments, whether the folk concept of temporal passage can be satisfied (...)
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  29. An Empirical Investigation of the Role of Direction in our Concept of Time.Andrew J. Latham, Kristie Miller & James Norton - 2021 - Acta Analytica 36 (1):25-47.
    This paper empirically investigates one aspect of the folk concept of time by testing how the presence or absence of directedness impacts judgements about whether there is time in a world. Experiment 1 found that dynamists, showed significantly higher levels of agreement that there is time in dynamically directed worlds than in non-dynamical non-directed worlds. Comparing our results to those we describe in Latham et al., we report that while ~ 70% of dynamists say there is time in B-theory worlds, (...)
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  30.  18
    Laura J. Miller, Building Nature's Market: The Business and Politics of Natural Food. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2017. Pp. 288. ISBN 978-0-22650-123-9. $105.00. [REVIEW]Thomas P. Weber - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Science 51 (4):714-716.
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  31.  76
    Why do people represent time as dynamical? An investigation of temporal dynamism and the open future.Andrew J. Latham & Kristie Miller - forthcoming - Philosophical Studies.
    Deflationists hold that it does not seem to us, in experience, as though time robustly passes. There is some recent empirical evidence that appears to support this contention. Equally, empirical evidence suggests that we naïvely represent time as dynamical. Thus deflationists are faced with an explanatory burden. If, as they maintain, the world seems to us in experience as though it is non-dynamical, then why do we represent time as dynamical? This paper takes up the challenge of investigating, on the (...)
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  32.  7
    General philosophy.J. Tartaglia J. Miller - 2005 - Philosophical Books 46 (1):77-83.
    Dancy, J., Reading ParfitMillgram, E., Practical Induction.
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  33. Belief in robust temporal passage (probably) does not explain future-bias.Andrew J. Latham, Kristie Miller, Christian Tarsney & Hannah Tierney - 2022 - Philosophical Studies 179 (6):2053-2075.
    Empirical work has lately confirmed what many philosophers have taken to be true: people are ‘biased toward the future’. All else being equal, we usually prefer to have positive experiences in the future, and negative experiences in the past. According to one hypothesis, the temporal metaphysics hypothesis, future-bias is explained either by our beliefs about temporal metaphysics—the temporal belief hypothesis—or alternatively by our temporal phenomenology—the temporal phenomenology hypothesis. We empirically investigate a particular version of the temporal belief hypothesis according to (...)
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  34. On Preferring that Overall, Things are Worse: Future‐Bias and Unequal Payoffs.Preston Greene, Andrew J. Latham, Kristie Miller & James Norton - 2021 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 105 (1):181-194.
    Philosophers working on time-biases assume that people are hedonically biased toward the future. A hedonically future-biased agent prefers pleasurable experiences to be future instead of past, and painful experiences to be past instead of future. Philosophers further predict that this bias is strong enough to apply to unequal payoffs: people often prefer less pleasurable future experiences to more pleasurable past ones, and more painful past experiences to less painful future ones. In addition, philosophers have predicted that future-bias is restricted to (...)
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  35. Geoffrey Hill and British Poetry, 1956-1986 an Analysis of Poetic Language and Poetic Voice.J. F. Lloyd - 1993
     
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  36. Julia Annas, on Papers in Hellenistic Philosophy by Jacques Brunschwig.J. Lloyd - 1996 - European Journal of Philosophy 4:369-372.
     
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  37. Translations and Notes by John Stuart Mill. Edited with an Introductory Essay by Ruth Barchardt, Four Dialogues of Plato. [REVIEW]J. M. Lloyd - 1946 - Hibbert Journal 45:186.
     
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  38. An Empirical Investigation of Purported Passage Phenomenology.Andrew J. Latham, Kristie Miller & James Norton - 2020 - Journal of Philosophy 117 (7):353-386.
    It has widely been assumed, by philosophers, that most people unambiguously have a phenomenology as of time passing, and that this is a datum that philosophical theories must accommodate. Moreover, it has been assumed that the greater the extent to which people have said phenomenology, the more likely they are to endorse a dynamical theory of time. This paper is the first to empirically test these assumptions. Surprisingly, our results do not support either assumption. One experiment instead found the reverse (...)
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  39. Why should historians take archaeology seriously?J. A. Lloyd - 1986 - In J. L. Bintliff & C. F. Gaffney (eds.), Archaeology at the Interface: Studies in Archaeology's Relationships with History, Geography, Biology, and Physical Science. B.A.R..
     
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  40. End-of-life choices.Phillip M. Kleepsies, Pamela J. Miller & Thomas A. Preston - 2008 - In James L. Werth & Dean Blevins (eds.), Decision Making Near the End of Life: Issues, Development, and Future Directions. Brunner-Routledge.
     
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  41. Time in a one‐instant world.Andrew J. Latham & Kristie Miller - 2020 - Ratio 33 (3):145-154.
    Many philosophers hold that ‘one-instant worlds’—worlds that contain a single instant—fail to contain time. We experimentally investigate whether these worlds satisfy the folk concept of time. We found that ~50% of participants hold that there is time in such worlds. We argue that this suggests one of two possibilities. First, the population disagree about whether at least one of the A-, B-, or C-series is necessary for time, with there being a substantial sub-population for whom the presence of neither an (...)
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  42. How Much Do We Discount Past Pleasures?Preston Greene, Andrew J. Latham, Kristie Miller & James Norton - 2022 - American Philosophical Quarterly 59 (4):367-376.
    Future-biased individuals systematically prefer pleasures to be in the future and pains to be in the past. Empirical research shows that negative future-bias is robust: people prefer more past pain to less future pain. Is positive future-bias robust or fragile? Do people only prefer pleasures to be located in the future, compared to the past, when those pleasures are of equal value, or do they continue to prefer that pleasures be located in the future even when past pleasures outweigh future (...)
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  43. Judgements of Metaphysical Explanations are Context Sensitive.Andrew J. Latham & Kristie Miller - manuscript
    Empirical investigation of the conditions under which people prefer, or disprefer, causal explanation, has suggested to many that our judgements about what causally explains what are context sensitive in a number of ways. This has led many to suppose that whether or not a causal explanation obtains depends on various contextual factors, and that said explanations can obtain in one context, and not in another: they are both subjective and agent-relative. Surprisingly, most accounts of metaphysical explanation suppose there to be (...)
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  44. Investigating Non-philosophers’ Judgements about the Asymmetry of Metaphysical Explanation.Andrew J. Latham & Kristie Miller - manuscript
    It is often supposed that metaphysical explanation is asymmetric: that for all x and y, if x metaphysically explains y, then y does not metaphysically explain x. Even amongst those who hold that metaphysical explanation is not asymmetric, but nonsymmetric, it is assumed that a relatively small number of particular explanations are symmetric: by and large, if x metaphysically explains y, then y does not metaphysically explain x. Both parties agree that as a matter of fact we at least typically (...)
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  45. Is it identity all the way down? From supersubstantivalism to composition as identity and back again.Michael J. Duncan & Kristie Miller - forthcoming - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy.
    We argue that, insofar as one accepts either supersubstantivalism or strong composition as identity for the usual reasons, one has (defeasible) reasons to accept the other as well. Thus, all else being equal, one ought to find the package that combines both views—the Identity Package—more attractive than any rival package that includes one, but not the other, of either supersubstantivalism or composition as identity.
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  46. Are the Folk Functionalists About Time?Andrew J. Latham & Kristie Miller - 2022 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 60 (2):221-248.
    This paper empirically investigates the contention that the folk concept of time is a functional concept: a concept according to which time is whatever plays a certain functional role or roles. This hypothesis could explain why, in previous research, surprisingly large percentages of participants judge that there is time at worlds that contain no one-dimensional substructure of ordered instants. If it seems to participants that even in those worlds the relevant functional role is played, then this could explain why they (...)
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  47. Blackfish City by Sam J. Miller[REVIEW]Curtis Gruenler - 2019 - The Bulletin of the Colloquium on Violence and Religion 60:13-14.
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  48. Quantum gravity, timelessness, and the folk concept of time.Andrew J. Latham & Kristie Miller - 2020 - Synthese 198 (10):9453-9478.
    What it would take to vindicate folk temporal error theory? This question is significant against a backdrop of new views in quantum gravity—so-called timeless physical theories—that claim to eliminate time by eliminating a one-dimensional substructure of ordered temporal instants. Ought we to conclude that if these views are correct, nothing satisfies the folk concept of time and hence that folk temporal error theory is true? In light of evidence we gathered, we argue that physical theories that entirely eliminate an ordered (...)
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  49.  17
    Experiential Learning in Organizations: Applications of the Tavistock Group Relations Approach: Contributions in Honour of Eric J. Miller.Laurence J. Gould, Lionel F. Stapley & Mark Stein (eds.) - 2004 - Karnac Books.
    The papers in this book address the broad issues of authority, leadership and organizational culture, whilst concentrating on other issues in-depth, such as inter-group conflict, and gender and race relations in the workplace.
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  50. Creature motion.J. J. Freyd & G. F. Miller - 1992 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 30 (6):470-470.
     
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