Results for 'Local food'

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  1. Are Local Food and the Local Food Movement Taking Us Where We Want to Go? Or Are We Hitching Our Wagons to the Wrong Stars?Laura B. DeLind - 2011 - Agriculture and Human Values 28 (2):273-283.
    Much is being made of local food. It is at once a social movement, a diet, and an economic strategy—a popular solution—to a global food system in great distress. Yet, despite its popularity or perhaps because of it, local food (especially in the US) is also something of a chimera if not a tool of the status quo. This paper reflects on and contrasts aspects of current local food rhetoric with Dalhberg’s notion of (...)
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  2.  63
    Growing Local Food: Scale and Local Food Systems Governance.Phil Mount - 2012 - Agriculture and Human Values 29 (1):107-121.
    “Scaling-up” is the next hurdle facing the local food movement. In order to effect broader systemic impacts, local food systems (LFS) will have to grow, and engage either more or larger consumers and producers. Encouraging the involvement of mid-sized farms looks to be an elegant solution, by broadening the accessibility of local food while providing alternative revenue streams for troubled family farms. Logistical, structural and regulatory barriers to increased scale in LFS are well known. (...)
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  3.  85
    From Food Justice to a Tool of the Status Quo: Three Sub-Movements Within Local Food.Ian Werkheiser & Samantha Noll - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (2):201-210.
    The local food movement has been touted by some as a profoundly effective way to make our food system become more healthy, just, and sustainable. Others have criticized the movement as being less a challenge to the status quo and more an easily co-opted support offering just another set of choices for affluent consumers. In this paper, we analyze three distinct sub-movements within the local food movement, the individual-focused sub-movement, the systems-focused sub-movement, and the community-focused (...)
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  4.  86
    Food Miles, Local Eating, and Community Supported Agriculture: Putting Local Food in its Place. [REVIEW]Steven M. Schnell - 2013 - Agriculture and Human Values 30 (4):615-628.
    The idea of “food miles,” the distance that food has to be shipped, has entered into debates in both popular and academic circles about local eating. An oft-cited figure claims that the “average item” of food travels 1,500 miles before it reaches your plate. The source of this figure is almost never given, however, and indeed, it is a figure with surprisingly little grounding in objective research. In this study, I track the evolution of this figure, (...)
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  5.  97
    Of Bodies, Place, and Culture: Re-Situating Local Food[REVIEW]Laura B. Delind - 2005 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (2):121-146.
    In the US, an increasingly popular local food movement is propelled along by structural arguments that highlight the inequity and unsustainablity of the current agri-food system and by individually based arguments that highlight personal health and well-being. Despite clear differences in their foci, the deeper values contained in each argument tend to be neglected or lost, while local innovations assume instrumental and largely market-based forms. By narrowing their focus to the rational and the economic, movement activists (...)
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  6. Local Food and International Ethics.Mark C. Navin - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (3):349-368.
    Many advocate practices of ‘local food’ or ‘locavorism’ as a partial solution to the injustices and unsustainability of contemporary food systems. I think that there is much to be said in favor of local food movements, but these virtues are insufficient to immunize locavorism from criticism. In particular, three duties of international ethics—beneficence, repair and fairness—may provide reasons for constraining the developed world’s permissible pursuit of local food. A complete account of why (and (...)
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  7.  26
    The Chisan-Chisho Movement: Japanese Local Food Movement and its Challenges. [REVIEW]Aya Hirata Kimura & Mima Nishiyama - 2008 - Agriculture and Human Values 25 (1):49-64.
    This paper examines the increasingly popular chisan-chisho movement that has promoted the localization of food consumption in Japan since the late-1990s. Chisan-chisho emerged in the context of a perceived crisis in the Japanese food system, particularly the long-term decline of agriculture and rural community and more recent episodes of food scandals. Although initially started as a grassroots movement, many chisan-chisho initiatives are now organized by governments and farmers’ cooperatives. Acknowledging that the chisan-chisho movement has added some important (...)
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  8.  33
    Liberalism and the Two Directions of the Local Food Movement.Samantha Noll - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (2):211-224.
    The local food movement is, increasingly, becoming a part of the modern American landscape. However, while it appears that the local food movement is gaining momentum, one could question whether or not this trend is, in fact, politically and socially sustainable. Is local food just another trend that will fade away or is it here to stay? One way to begin addressing this question is to ascertain whether or not it is compatible with liberalism, (...)
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  9.  36
    Engagement for Transformation: Value Webs for Local Food System Development. [REVIEW]Daniel R. Block, Michael Thompson, Jill Euken, Toni Liquori, Frank Fear & Sherill Baldwin - 2008 - Agriculture and Human Values 25 (3):379-388.
    Engagement happens when academics and non-academics form partnerships to create mutual understanding, and then take action together. An example is the “value web” work associated with W. K. Kellogg Foundation’s Food Systems Higher Education–Community Partnership. Partners nationally work on local food systems development by building value webs. “Value chains,” a concept with considerable currency in the private sector, involves creating non-hierarchical relationships among otherwise disparate actors and entities to achieve collective common goals. The value web concept is (...)
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  10.  20
    Federal Regulation of Local and Sustainable Food Claims in Canada: A Case Study of Local Food Plus. [REVIEW]Fiona N. Louden & Rod J. MacRae - 2010 - Agriculture and Human Values 27 (2):177-188.
    Interest in purchasing local food from suppliers who follow sustainable practices is growing in Canada. Such suppliers wish to have their products recognized in the market so that price premiums might be received, and new markets developed. In response, the organization Local Food Plus (LFP) developed standards and a certification process to authenticate local and sustainable claims. LFP provides certification seals, and labeling provisions for qualifying producers and processors. However, given pre-existing national food labeling (...)
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  11.  24
    Mobility, Embodiment, and Scales: Filipino Immigrant Perspectives on Local Food[REVIEW]J. M. Valiente-Neighbours - 2012 - Agriculture and Human Values 29 (4):531-541.
    Local foodshed proponents in the United States seek to change the food system through campaigns to “buy local” and to rediscover “good food” in the local foodshed. Presumably, common sense dictates that the word “local” signifies spatial proximity to the consumer. For some populations, however, both the terms “local” and “local food” signify various different meanings. The local food definition generally used by scholars and activists alike as “geographically proximate (...)
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  12.  11
    Consumer Perceptions About Local Food in New Zealand, and the Role of Life Cycle-Based Environmental Sustainability.S. Hiroki, E. Garnevska & S. McLaren - 2016 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 29 (3):479-505.
    Local food is a popular subject among consumers, as well as food producers, distributors, policymakers and researchers in many countries. Previous research has identified that the definition of local food varies by context, and from country to country. The literature also suggested that environmental sustainability is one of the goals for many of the local food movements. While there is a substantial body of literature on local food internationally, limited research has (...)
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  13.  47
    Place, Taste, or Face-to-Face? Understanding Producer–Consumer Networks in “LocalFood Systems in Washington State.Theresa Selfa & Joan Qazi - 2005 - Agriculture and Human Values 22 (4):451-464.
    In an increasingly globalized food economy, local agri-food initiatives are promoted as more sustainable alternatives, both for small-scale producers and ecologically conscious consumers. However, revitalizing local agri-food communities in rural agro-industrial regions is particularly challenging. This case study examines Grant and Chelan Counties, two industrial farming regions in rural Central Washington State, distant from the urban fringe. Farmers in these counties have tried diversifying large-scale processing into organics and marketing niche and organic produce at popular (...)
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  14.  28
    Linking Future Population Food Requirements for Health with Local Production in Waterloo Region, Canada.Ellen Desjardins, Rod MacRae & Theresa Schumilas - 2010 - Agriculture and Human Values 27 (2):129-140.
    Regional planning for improved agricultural capacity to supply produce, legumes, and whole grains has the potential to improve population health as well as the local food economy. This case study of Waterloo Region (WR), Canada, had two objectives. First, we estimate the quantity of locally grown vegetables, fruits, legumes, and whole grains needed to help meet the Region of Waterloo population’s optimal nutritional requirements currently and in 2026. Secondly, we estimate how much of these healthy food requirements (...)
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  15. The Ethics of Food: A Reader for the Twenty-First Century.Ronald Bailey, Wendell Berry, Norman Borlaug, M. F. K. Fisher, Nichols Fox, Greenpeace International, Garrett Hardin, Mae-Wan Ho, Marc Lappe, Britt Bailey, Tanya Maxted-Frost, Henry I. Miller, Helen Norberg-Hodge, Stuart Patton, C. Ford Runge, Benjamin Senauer, Vandana Shiva, Peter Singer, Anthony J. Trewavas, the U. S. Food & Drug Administration - 2001 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In The Ethics of Food, Gregory E. Pence brings together a collection of voices who share the view that the ethics of genetically modified food is among the most pressing societal questions of our time. This comprehensive collection addresses a broad range of subjects, including the meaning of food, moral analyses of vegetarianism and starvation, the safety and environmental risks of genetically modified food, issues of global food politics and the food industry, and the (...)
     
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  16.  53
    Scaling Up: Bringing Public Institutions and Food Service Corporations Into the Project for a Local, Sustainable Food System in Ontario. [REVIEW]Harriet Friedmann - 2007 - Agriculture and Human Values 24 (3):389-398.
    This paper reports on a relationship between the University of Toronto and a non-profit, non-governmental (“third party”) certifying organization called Local Flavour Plus (LFP). The University as of August 2006 requires its corporate caterers to use local and sustainable farm products for a small but increasing portion of meals for most of its 60,000 students. LFP is the certifying body, whose officers and consultants have strong relations of trust with sustainable farmers. It redefines standards and verification to create (...)
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  17.  47
    Buying Into the Food System: Trends in Food Retailing in the US and Implications for Local Foods. [REVIEW]Amy Guptill & Jennifer L. Wilkins - 2002 - Agriculture and Human Values 19 (1):39-51.
    The contemporary US food systemis characterized by both an unprecedentedconcentration of corporate control as well as afragmentation of sourcing and marketingprocesses, introducing both new constraints andnew opportunities for more localized foodsystems. The purpose of our study is to explorethese issues by investigating three keyquestions. First, what are the key trends inthe US grocery industry? Second, how dodifferent kinds of food outlets choose,procure, and promote food products? Finally,what are the implications of recent trends inthe food retailing process (...)
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  18.  46
    Local Food Policy Coalitions: Evaluation Issues as Seen by Academics, Project Organizers, and Funders. [REVIEW]Karen L. Webb, David Pelletier, Audrey N. Maretzki & Jennifer Wilkins - 1998 - Agriculture and Human Values 15 (1):65-75.
    Several different evaluation issuesare perceived as important by people involved withinnovative projects intended to improve local food andnutrition systems; particularly the establishment oflocal food policy coalitions. Several such coalitionshave been formed in North America, Europe, andAustralia with the goal of improving community foodsecurity and promoting sustainable local food systems.Pioneer coalitions have served as models, yet therehas been little systematic evaluation of thesemodels. A qualitative study was conducted to identifyfactors that may hinder evaluation efforts. In grouptelephone (...)
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  19.  51
    Cultivating Cacao Implications of Sun-Grown Cacao on Local Food Security and Environmental Sustainability.Jill M. Belsky & Stephen F. Siebert - 2003 - Agriculture and Human Values 20 (3):277-285.
    The reasons why upland farmerson the Indonesian island of Sulawesi areengaged in a cacao boom and its long termimplications are addressed in the context ofprotected area management regulations, andpolitical and economic conditions inPost-Suharto, Indonesia. In the remote casestudy village of Moa in Central Sulawesi, wefound that while few households cultivatedcacao in the early 1990s, all had planted cacaoby 2000. Furthermore, the vast majoritycultivate cacao in former food-crop focusedswidden fields under full-sun conditions.Farmers cultivate cacao to establish propertyrights in light of (...)
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  20.  30
    Understanding Local Agri-Food Systems Through Advice Network Analysis.Yuna Chiffoleau & Jean-Marc Touzard - 2014 - Agriculture and Human Values 31 (1):19-32.
    Agri-food clusters have generated great interest in recent years and prompted a new wave of research dedicated to ‘Localized Agri-Food Systems’. However, the specific nature of relations between firms who belong to SYALs has rarely been studied. Our purpose is to show how the analysis of company directors’ advice networks helps to better understand the specificity and innovative dynamics of SYALs. Our research was based on a case study in the Biterrois wine growing region of southern France. We (...)
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  21.  20
    Operationalizing Local Food: Goals, Actions, and Indicators for Alternative Food Systems.David A. Cleveland, Allison Carruth & Daniella Niki Mazaroli - 2015 - Agriculture and Human Values 32 (2):281-297.
    Spatial localization, often demarcated by food miles, has emerged as the dominant theme in movements for more socially just and environmentally benign alternative food systems, especially in industrialized countries such as the United States. We analyze how an emphasis on spatial localization, combined with the difficulty of defining and measuring adequate indicators for alternative food systems, can challenge efforts by food system researchers, environmental writers, the engaged public, and advocacy groups wanting to contribute to alternative (...) systems, and facilitates exploitation by the mainstream players using “localwash” to maintain the status quo. New indicators are urgently needed because research shows that spatial localization in general and minimized food miles in particular are not adequate or even required for most of the goals of alternative food systems. Creating indicators to operationalize goals for alternative, local food systems requires asking the right questions to make sure indicators are not misleading us: What are the goals of alternative food systems? What actions and policies will most effectively achieve those goals? What is the potential of reducing food miles as an action and a policy for achieving goals? What are the best indicators for measuring progress toward goals? We discuss how these questions can be answered for a wide range of alternative food system goals via four categories according to the role of food miles reduction as an action and policy in promoting them: necessary and sufficient, necessary but not sufficient, potentially important, and potentially supportive. (shrink)
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  22.  12
    Reconnecting Through Local Food Initiatives? Purpose, Practice and Conceptions of ‘Value’.Cayla Albrecht & John Smithers - 2018 - Agriculture and Human Values 35 (1):67-81.
    Reconnection between producers and consumers is often presented as an integral part of the local food narrative. However, questions can arise as to whether local food producers and their food purchasers align in mindset and the value proposition that underpins their involvement. This paper draws on interview data collected from producers and consumers participating in direct-sell meat operations to explore so-called value propositions between these two actors in local food initiatives in Southwestern Ontario, (...)
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  23.  12
    Invoices on Scraps of Paper: Trust and Reciprocity in Local Food Systems.Shawn A. Trivette - 2017 - Agriculture and Human Values 34 (3):529-542.
    One of the many claims about the value of local food is that local food exchanges generate trust between producers and consumers. To what degree is this actually the case and how does such trust develop? Drawing on interview and fieldwork data in one local food system in the Northeastern U.S., I show how local food participants build trust and reciprocity with one another in order to mitigate the challenges imposed by the (...)
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  24.  5
    Invoices on Scraps of Paper: Trust and Reciprocity in Local Food Systems.Shawn A. Trivette - 2017 - Agriculture and Human Values 34 (3):529-542.
    One of the many claims about the value of local food is that local food exchanges generate trust between producers and consumers. To what degree is this actually the case and how does such trust develop? Drawing on interview and fieldwork data in one local food system in the Northeastern U.S., I show how local food participants build trust and reciprocity with one another in order to mitigate the challenges imposed by the (...)
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  25.  9
    “Conservative” Ideology and the Politics of Local Food.Andrew Davey - 2018 - Agriculture and Human Values 35 (4):853-865.
    Analysis of conservative political participation in local food initiatives tends to be critical and dismissive, positing this participation as self-serving, individualistic, exclusionary, nativist, or reactionary. While there are nefarious aspects to certain forms of conservative local food politics, my research at three farmers’ markets in the Upper Midwest reveals that self-identified conservatives can and do hold more nuanced positions. Those with whom I met recognize the need for both local and broader change, are concerned about (...)
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  26.  44
    Selective Patronage and Social Justice: Local Food Consumer Campaigns in Historical Context.C. Clare Hinrichs & Patricia Allen - 2008 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (4):329-352.
    In the early 2000s, the development of local food systems in advanced industrial countries has expanded beyond creation and support of farmers’ markets and community supported agriculture farms and projects to include targeted Buy Local Food campaigns. Non-governmental groups in many U.S. places and regions have launched such campaigns with the intent of motivating and directing consumers toward more local food purchasing in general. This article examines the current manifestations and possibilities for social justice (...)
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  27.  13
    How Local is Local? Determining the Boundaries of Local Food in Practice.Shawn A. Trivette - 2015 - Agriculture and Human Values 32 (3):475-490.
    This paper addresses the question of how local can be defined in practice. It contributes to the growing literature on local food systems and particularly our understanding of what counts as local and the elements that influence those contours. While most of our conceptions of local food tend to rely on an articulation of either proximity traveled or relationship between entities, I argue that a more nuanced and complete understanding must take account of both (...)
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  28.  11
    Governments, Grassroots, and the Struggle for Local Food Systems: Containing, Coopting, Contesting and Collaborating.Stéphane M. McLachlan, Colin R. Anderson & Julia M. L. Laforge - 2017 - Agriculture and Human Values 34 (3):663-681.
    Local sustainable food systems have captured the popular imagination as a progressive, if not radical, pillar of a sustainable food future. Yet these grassroots innovations are embedded in a dominant food regime that reflects productivist, industrial, and neoliberal policies and institutions. Understanding the relationship between these emerging grassroots efforts and the dominant food regime is of central importance in any transition to a more sustainable food system. In this study, we examine the encounters of (...)
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  29.  11
    “Going Local”: Farmers’ Perspectives on Local Food Systems in Rural Canada.Naomi Beingessner & Amber J. Fletcher - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (1):129-145.
    Amid the highly industrialized, export-focused food system of the Canadian prairies, some farmers and consumers are turning to localized agriculture as an alternative—they are “going local”. Despite farmers’ obvious importance to the food system, surprisingly little research has examined their motivations and reasons for localization. To date, most local food scholarship in North America has focused on either consumers’ motivations to buy local or the systemic aspects of local food, such as regulations, (...)
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  30.  35
    The Aesthetic Value of Local Food.Matthew Adams - 2018 - The Monist 101 (3):324-339.
    Local food is often defended on environmental grounds. However, environmental defenses of local food are flawed, and all environmental defenses are limited as they at most establish that local food is instrumentally valuable. These deficiencies motivate a different approach. By drawing on the aesthetics of engagement, a theory of environmental aesthetics, I argue that local food has an overlooked intrinsic value; it can allow people to become engaged with—and thereby aesthetically appreciate—the environment. (...)
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  31.  8
    Malign and Benign Neglect: A Local Food System and the Myth of Sustainable Redevelopment in Appalachia Ohio.Angela M. Chapman & Harold A. Perkins - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (1):113-127.
    Local food systems seem virtuous in the larger context of the neoliberalization of global food systems and increasing food insecurity. However, local food systems are critiqued for reproducing neoliberalism when they prioritize niche-market consumerism over enhancing access for poor people. Advocates, in contrast, insist local food systems contribute to an equitable political economy of food if they are place-based and inclusive. Local food systems must not, according to them, be (...)
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  32.  23
    What Are the Odds of Being an Organic or Local Food Shopper? Multivariate Analysis of US Food Shopper Lifestyle Segments.Lydia Zepeda & Cong Nie - 2012 - Agriculture and Human Values 29 (4):467-480.
    The growth in organic and local foods consumption has been examined using two different approaches to identify characteristics and motivations of food shoppers: market segmentation and economic models using multivariate analysis. The former approach, based on Means-end Chain theory, examines how intrinsic characteristics of foods affect food choices. The latter microeconomic approach examines economic constraints and extrinsic factors. This study demonstrates value in combining the two approaches to generate better empirical predictions of who buys organic and (...) food. It also supports a broader theoretical framework to explain behavior in terms of intrinsic and extrinsic motivations. Using US data, an adaptation of the Food Related Lifestyle model yields four consumer lifestyles segmented by intrinsic motivations related to food. Each consumer segment exhibits distinct organic and local foods consumption behaviors. A multinomial logit model is estimated to examine the probability of being in one of these four groups as a function of extrinsic variables and economic constraints. In support of Alphabet theory and Regulatory Focus theory, we find that inclusion of extrinsic factors improves prediction of behavior and the ability to explain why they buy organic and local foods. The extrinsic variables that significantly increase the probability of being in a particular consumer food lifestyle segment include: environmental concerns, health practices, race, the presence of a farmers’ market, and to a lesser degree, family composition and income. We also find regulatory focus is most pronounced among the most active organic and local food shoppers. (shrink)
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  33.  17
    The Importance of Food Retailers: Applying Network Analysis Techniques to the Study of Local Food Systems.Shawn A. Trivette - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (1):77-90.
    As local food activities expand and grow, an important question to answer is how various participants contribute to a local food system’s overall vitality and strength. This paper does so by focusing on the relationships between locally-oriented farm and retail actors and assessing what the configuration of these relationships tells us about the workings of the broader local food system. Such an analysis reveals two things. Empirically, it shows the important role food retailers (...)
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  34.  8
    Which Communication Channels Shape Normative Perceptions About Buying Local Food? An Application of Social Exposure.Laura Witzling, Bret Shaw & David Trechter - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (3):443-454.
    We examined how information from multiple communication channels can inform social norms about local food purchasing. The concept of social exposure was used as a guide. Social exposure articulates how information in social, symbolic, and physical environments contributes to normative perceptions. Data was collected from a sample in Wisconsin. Results indicated that information from communication channels representing symbolic, social, and physical environments all contributed to normative perceptions. We also found that for individuals who frequent farmers’ markets, information from (...)
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  35.  19
    Just Where Does Local Food Live? Assessing Farmers’ Markets in the United States.Justin L. Schupp - 2016 - Agriculture and Human Values 33 (4):827-841.
    Participation in the local food movement has grown dramatically in the United States, with the farmers’ market being one of its most widespread and heavily promoted forums. Proponents argue that the interactions and transactions that occur at farmers’ markets benefit market participants, but, more importantly, have broader benefits for the neighborhoods they are located in and for society itself. The promise of these benefits raises several important questions, notably: where are farmers’ markets located and who has access to (...)
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  36.  20
    Do Locavores Have a Dilemma? Economic Discourse and the Local Food Critique.Helen Scharber & Anita Dancs - 2016 - Agriculture and Human Values 33 (1):121-133.
    Local food critics have recently argued that locavores, unaware of economic laws and principles, are ironically promoting a future characterized by less food security and more environmental destruction. In this paper, we critically examine the ways in which mainstream economics discourse is employed in arguments to undermine the proclaimed benefits of local food. We focus on several core concepts in economics—comparative advantage, scale, trade and efficiency—and show how they have been used to challenge claims about (...)
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  37.  15
    Mother Nature has It Right: Local Food Advocacy and the Appeal to the “Natural”.Anne Portman - 2014 - Ethics and the Environment 19 (1):1.
    In the discourse on local food, the concept of “nature” and the “natural” is frequently and uncritically invoked to argue for the ethical significance of participating in and advocating for local food networks. I began thinking about the normative role of the “natural” in local food discourses when I observed that such appeals to the “natural” somewhat mirror appeals to the “natural” in the debate surrounding the health and safety of genetically modified (GM) (...). Victoria Davion characterizes that debate as one in which both sides appeal to the concept of the “natural” as equivalent to what is “safe, legitimate, and otherwise acceptable” (2008, 84). Those who argue that GM food is natural and those who argue .. (shrink)
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  38.  3
    Governments, Grassroots, and the Struggle for Local Food Systems: Containing, Coopting, Contesting and Collaborating.Stéphane M. McLachlan, Colin R. Anderson & Julia M. L. Laforge - 2017 - Agriculture and Human Values 34 (3):663-681.
    Local sustainable food systems have captured the popular imagination as a progressive, if not radical, pillar of a sustainable food future. Yet these grassroots innovations are embedded in a dominant food regime that reflects productivist, industrial, and neoliberal policies and institutions. Understanding the relationship between these emerging grassroots efforts and the dominant food regime is of central importance in any transition to a more sustainable food system. In this study, we examine the encounters of (...)
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  39.  6
    Local Food Networks as Communities of Practice.Jerry Calton, Stephanie Welcomer, Mark Haggerty & Linda Sama - 2016 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 27:21-31.
    The purpose of our workshop was to call attention to emerging communities of practice where academics and community activists are coming together to learn how to grow slow food networks. One expression of this movement is the creation of local food hubs which can potentially forge global links that scale up to forge a global action network or GAN.
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  40.  19
    A Blind Spot in Food and Nutrition Security: Where Culture and Social Change Shape the Local Food Plate.Anna-Lisa Noack & Nicky R. M. Pouw - 2015 - Agriculture and Human Values 32 (2):169-182.
    It is estimated that over 800 million people are hungry each day and two billion are suffering from the consequences of vitamin and mineral deficiencies. While a paradigm shift towards a multi-dimensional and multi-sectoral approach to food and nutrition insecurity is emerging, technical approaches largely prevail to tackle the causes of hunger and malnutrition. Founded in original in-depth field research among smallholder farmers in southwest Kenya, we argue that incorporating cultural or social dimensions in this technical debate is imperative (...)
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  41.  18
    Local or Localized? Exploring the Contributions of Franco-Mediterranean Agrifood Theory to Alternative Food Research.Sarah Bowen & Tad Mutersbaugh - 2014 - Agriculture and Human Values 31 (2):201-213.
    Notions such as terroir and “Slow Food,” which originated in Mediterranean Europe, have emerged as buzzwords around the globe, becoming commonplace across Europe and economically important in the United States and Canada, Latin America, Africa, and Asia. Given the increased global prominence of terroir and regulatory frameworks like geographical indications, we argue that the associated conceptual tools have become more relevant to scholars working within the “alternative food networks” framework in the United States and United Kingdom. Specifically, the (...)
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  42.  53
    Devon Acres CSA: Local Struggles in a Global Food System. [REVIEW]Robert Feagan & Amanda Henderson - 2009 - Agriculture and Human Values 26 (3):203-217.
    This paper focuses on examining the dynamic nature of community supported agriculture (CSA) and the real-world experiences which mark its contours, often making it distinct from the early idealized CSA “model.” Specifically, our study examines the narratives of the farmers of Devon Acres CSA over its duration, in tandem with a survey of recent shareholders in order to understand and explain its evolution. The framework we develop here shows that this CSA is largely characterized by instrumental and functional beliefs and (...)
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  43.  23
    Local Autonomy and Sustainable Development: Testing Import Substitution in More Localized Food Systems. [REVIEW]Anne C. Bellows & Michael W. Hamm - 2001 - Agriculture and Human Values 18 (3):271-284.
    Community initiatives to create more localized food systems ofteninclude the strategy of import substitution, i.e., increasing local foodproduction for local consumption. The purpose of this policy iseffectively to supplant some level of imported food into the region. Weargue that such action can carry social and environmental risks as wellas benefits and we have developed research parameters to measure theimpact of such strategies. Harriet Friedmann's seminal work (1991) onthe employment of import substitution by transnational corporationsprovides a framework (...)
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  44.  26
    The Legitimacy of the Supranational Regulation of Local Systems of Food Production: A Discussion Whose Time Has Come.Emanuela Ceva, Chiara Testino & Federico Zuolo - 2015 - Journal of Social Philosophy 46 (4):418-433.
    By reference to the illustrative case of the supranational regulation of local systems of food production, we aim to show the importance of identifying issues of international legitimacy as a discrete component – alongside issues of global distributive justice – of the liberal project of public justification of supranational collective decisions. Therefore, we offer the diagnosis of a problem but do not prescribe the therapy to cure it.
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  45.  13
    Assembling Local, Assembling Food Security.Angga Dwiartama & Cinzia Piatti - 2016 - Agriculture and Human Values 33 (1):153-164.
    The term ‘food security’ has been used in multiple ways and addresses not only issues around availability and accessibility of foods, but also, among others, the sustainability of livelihoods at the local community level—an issue often seen as a basis for the proliferation of local and alternative food networks. Accordingly, in this paper we attempt to develop a theoretical re-framing that is able to link food security with AFNs in arguing that the understanding of the (...)
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  46.  17
    From Commodity Surplus to Food Justice: Food Banks and Local Agriculture in the United States.Domenic Vitiello, Jeane Ann Grisso, K. Leah Whiteside & Rebecca Fischman - 2015 - Agriculture and Human Values 32 (3):419-430.
    Amidst expanding interest in local food and agriculture, food banks and allied organizations across the United States have increasingly engaged in diverse gleaning, gardening, and farming activities. Some of these programs reinforce food banks’ traditional role in distributing surplus commodities, and most extend food banks’ reliance on middle class volunteers and charitable donations. But some gleaning and especially gardening and farming programs seek to build poor people’s and communities’ capacity to meet more of their own (...)
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  47.  20
    Jennifer Meta Robinson and James Robert Farmer: Selling Local: Why Local Food Movements Matter: University of Indiana Press, Bloomington, IN, 2017, 198 Pp., ISBN 978-0-253-02698-9.Emily Nink - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (1):159-160.
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  48.  9
    Brandi Janssen: Making Local Food Work: The Challenges and Opportunities of Today’s Small Farmers: University of Iowa Press, Iowa City, Iowa, 2017, 230 Pp, ISBN 978-1609384920.Simona Zollet - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (1):161-162.
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    Neil Reid, Jay D. Gatrell and Paula S. Ross : Local Food Systems in Old Industrial Regions: Concepts, Spatial Context, and Local Practices: Ashgate, Burlington, VT, 2012, 264 Pp, ISBN 9781409432210.Zachary B. Herrnstadt - 2014 - Agriculture and Human Values 31 (1):163-164.
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  50.  5
    A Study on the Ethical Meaning of Food in Local Food. 변순용 - 2014 - Journal of Ethics 1 (94):135-153.
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