Results for 'Logical Consequence and Entailment'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Logical Consequence and Natural Language.Michael Glanzberg - 2015 - In Colin R. Caret & Ole T. Hjortland (eds.), Foundations of Logical Consequence. Oxford University Press. pp. 71-120.
    One of the great successes in the study of language has been the application of formal methods, including those of formal logic. Even so, this chapter argues against one way of accounting for this success, by arguing that the study of natural language semantics and of logical consequence relations are not the same. There is indeed a lot we can glean about logic from looking at our languages, and at our inferential practices, but the semantic properties of natural (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  2. Barriers to Entailment: Hume's Law and other limits on logical consequence.Gillian K. Russell - 2023 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    A barrier to entailment exists if you can't get conclusions of a certain kind from premises of another. One of the most famous barriers in philosophy is Hume's Law, which says that you can't get normative conclusions from descriptive premises, or in slogan form: you can't get an ought from an is. This barrier is highly controversial, and many famous counterexamples were proposed in the last century. But there are other barriers which function almost as philosophical platitudes: no Universal (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Deflating logical consequence.Lionel Shapiro - 2011 - Philosophical Quarterly 61 (243):320-342.
    Deflationists about truth seek to undermine debates about the nature of truth by arguing that the truth predicate is merely a device that allows us to express a certain kind of generality. I argue that a parallel approach is available in the case of logical consequence. Just as deflationism about truth offers an alternative to accounts of truth's nature in terms of correspondence or justification, deflationism about consequence promises an alternative to model-theoretic or proof-theoretic accounts of (...)'s nature. I then argue, against considerations put forward by Field and Beall, that Curry's paradox no more rules out deflationism about consequence than the liar paradox rules out deflationism about truth. (shrink)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   48 citations  
  4.  90
    Reinflating Logical Consequence.Owen Griffiths - 2012 - Journal of Philosophical Logic (1):1-9.
    Shapiro (Philos Q 61:320–342, 2011) argues that, if we are deflationists about truth, we should be deflationists about logical consequence. Like the truth predicate, he claims, the logical consequence predicate is merely a device of generalisation and more substantial characterisation, e.g. proof- or model-theoretic, is mistaken. I reject his analogy between truth and logical consequence and argue that, by appreciating how the logical consequence predicate is used as well as the goals of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  5. Logic for Exact Entailment.Kit Fine & Mark Jago - 2019 - Review of Symbolic Logic 12 (3):536-556.
    An exact truthmaker for A is a state which, as well as guaranteeing A’s truth, is wholly relevant to it. States with parts irrelevant to whether A is true do not count as exact truthmakers for A. Giving semantics in this way produces a very unusual consequence relation, on which conjunctions do not entail their conjuncts. This feature makes the resulting logic highly unusual. In this paper, we set out formal semantics for exact truthmaking and characterise the resulting notion (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  6.  22
    Paraconsistent Logical Consequence.Dale Jacquette - 1998 - Journal of Applied Non-Classical Logics 8 (4):337-351.
    ABSTRACT The concept of paraconsistent logical consequence is usually negatively defined as a validity semantics in which not every sentences is deducible or in which inferential explosion does not occur. Paraconsistency has been negatively characterized in this way because paraconsistent logics have been designed specifically to avoid the trivialization of deductive inference entailed by the classical paradoxes of material implication for applications in a system that tolerates syntactical contradictions. The effect of the negative characterization of paraconsistency has been (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Consequence and Normative Guidance.Florian Steinberger - 2017 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 98 (2):306-328.
    Logic, the tradition has it, is normative for reasoning. But is that really so? And if so, in what sense is logic normative for reasoning? As Gilbert Harman has reminded us, devising a logic and devising a theory of reasoning are two separate enterprises. Hence, logic's normative authority cannot reside in the fact that principles of logic just are norms of reasoning. Once we cease to identify the two, we are left with a gap. To bridge the gap one would (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  8.  25
    Applications of Scott's notion of consequence to the study of general binary intensional connectives and entailment.Dov M. Gabbay - 1973 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 2 (3):340 - 351.
  9.  71
    Context and consequence. An intercontextual substructural logic.Elia Zardini - 2014 - Synthese 191 (15):3473-3500.
    Some apparently valid arguments crucially rely on context change. To take a kind of example first discussed by Frege, ‘Tomorrow, it’ll be sunny’ taken on a day seems to entail ‘Today, it’s sunny’ taken on the next day, but the first sentence taken on a day sadly does not seem to entail the second sentence taken on the second next day. Mid-argument context change has not been accounted for by the tradition that has extensively studied the distinctive logical properties (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  10.  41
    Sum is a logical consequence of cogito.Ronald Suter - 1971 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 32 (2):235-240.
    HINTIKKA ("COGITO, ERGO SUM: INFERENCE OR PERFORMANCE?") WISHES TO REJECT (1) IF B(A) THEN THERE EXISTS X SUCH THAT X=A, POINTING OUT THAT IT WOULD CEASE TO BE PROVABLE IN QUANTIFICATION THEORY IF LOGICIANS DROPPED THE DUBIOUS ASSUMPTION THAT (2) ALL THE SINGULAR TERMS WITH WHICH WE HAVE TO DEAL DESIGNATE SOME ACTUALLY EXISTING INDIVIDUAL. HE ALSO ARGUES FOR THE FALSITY OF (3) THINKING ENTAILS EXISTENCE. WILLIAMS ("THE CERTAINTY OF THE COGITO") CONTENDS THAT DESCARTES INFERRED 'I EXIST' FROM 'I THINK' (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Entailment: The Logic of Relevance and Necessity. [REVIEW]F. K. C. - 1976 - Review of Metaphysics 30 (2):335-337.
    The title of this and proposed second volume presents the basic idea which unifies the wide variety of topics developed and investigated by the principal authors, major contributing authors, J. M. Dunn and Robert K. Meyer, and eleven other contributors. The other contributors are: J. R. Chidgey, J. A. Coffa, Dorthy L. Grover, Bas van Fraassen, H. Leblanc, Storrs McCall, A. Parks, G. Pottinger, R. Routley, A. Urquhart, and R. G. Wolf. From both the useful analytic table of contents and (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Logical Consequence and Logical Expressions.Mario Gómez-Torrente - 2003 - Theoria 18 (2):131-144.
    The pretheoretical notions of logical consequence and of a logical expression are linked in vague and complex ways to modal and pragmatic intuitions. I offer an introduction to the difficulties that these intuitions create when one attempts to give precise characterizations of those notions. Special attention is given to Tarski’s theories of logical consequence and logical constancy. I note that the Tarskian theory of logical consequence has fared better in the face of (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  13.  20
    The logic determined by Smiley’s matrix for Anderson and Belnap’s first-degree entailment logic.José M. Méndez & Gemma Robles - 2016 - Journal of Applied Non-Classical Logics 26 (1):47-68.
    The aim of this paper is to define the logical system Sm4 characterised by the degree of truth-preserving consequence relation defined on the ordered set of values of Smiley’s four-element matrix MSm4. The matrix MSm4 has been of considerable importance in the development of relevant logics and it is at the origin of bilattice logics. It will be shown that Sm4 is a most interesting paraconsistent logic which encloses a sound theory of logical necessity similar to that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  14. Logical Consequence and the Paradoxes.Edwin Mares & Francesco Paoli - 2014 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 43 (2-3):439-469.
    We group the existing variants of the familiar set-theoretical and truth-theoretical paradoxes into two classes: connective paradoxes, which can in principle be ascribed to the presence of a contracting connective of some sort, and structural paradoxes, where at most the faulty use of a structural inference rule can possibly be blamed. We impute the former to an equivocation over the meaning of logical constants, and the latter to an equivocation over the notion of consequence. Both equivocation sources are (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   51 citations  
  15. Dialetheism, logical consequence and hierarchy.Bruno Whittle - 2004 - Analysis 64 (4):318–326.
    I argue that dialetheists have a problem with the concept of logical consequence. The upshot of this problem is that dialetheists must appeal to a hierarchy of concepts of logical consequence. Since this hierarchy is akin to those invoked by more orthodox resolutions of the semantic paradoxes, its emergence would appear to seriously undermine the dialetheic treatments of these paradoxes. And since these are central to the case for dialetheism, this would represent a significant blow to (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  16.  55
    Dialetheism, logical consequence and hierarchy.Bruno Whittle - 2004 - Analysis 64 (4):318-326.
    I argue that dialetheists have a problem with the concept of logical consequence. The upshot of this problem is that dialetheists must appeal to a hierarchy of concepts of logical consequence. Since this hierarchy is akin to those invoked by more orthodox resolutions of the semantic paradoxes, its emergence would appear to seriously undermine the dialetheic treatments of these paradoxes. And since these are central to the case for dialetheism, this would represent a significant blow to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  17. Logical Consequence and Model-Theoretic Consequence.Greg O'Hair - 1992 - Logique Et Analyse 35:239-249.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18.  16
    Logical Consequence and Rationality.Nenad Smokrović - 2012 - In Majda Trobok Nenad Miščević & Berislav Žarnić (eds.), Between Logic and Reality. Springer. pp. 121--133.
  19.  16
    Gurus, Logical Consequence, and Truth-Bearers: What Is It that Is True?Shapiro St E. Wa Rt - 2005 - In J. C. Beall & B. Armour-Garb (eds.), Deflationary Truth. Open Court. pp. 153.
  20.  43
    Aristotle's Modal Logic: Essence and Entailment in the Organon.Richard Patterson - 1995 - New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press.
    Aristotle's Modal Logic, first published in 1995, presents an interpretation of Aristotle's logic by arguing that a proper understanding of the system depends on an appreciation of its connection to the metaphysics. Richard Patterson develops three striking theses in the book. First, there is a fundamental connection between Aristotle's logic of possibility and necessity, and his metaphysics, and that this connection extends far beyond the widely recognised tie to scientific demonstration and relates to the more basic distinction between the essential (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  21. Aristotle's Modal Logic. Essence and Entailment in the ‘Organon’.Richard Patterson - 1995 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 58 (3):567-569.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  22.  10
    Probabilistic entailment and iterated conditionals.A. Gilio, Niki Pfeifer & Giuseppe Sanfilippo - 2020 - In S. Elqayam, Igor Douven, J. St B. T. Evans & N. Cruz (eds.), Logic and uncertainty in the human mind: a tribute to David E. Over. London, UK: pp. 71-101.
    In this paper we exploit the notions of conjoined and iterated conditionals, which are defined in the setting of coherence by means of suitable conditional random quantities with values in the interval [0,1]. We examine the iterated conditional (B|K)|(A|H), by showing that A|H p-entails B|K if and only if (B|K)|(A|H) = 1. Then, we show that a p-consistent family F={E1|H1, E2|H2} p-entails a conditional event E3|H3 if and only if E3|H3= 1, or (E3|H3)|QC(S) = 1 for some nonempty subset S (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  23.  99
    Logical Consequence and First-Order Soundness and Completeness: A Bottom Up Approach.Eli Dresner - 2011 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 52 (1):75-93.
    What is the philosophical significance of the soundness and completeness theorems for first-order logic? In the first section of this paper I raise this question, which is closely tied to current debate over the nature of logical consequence. Following many contemporary authors' dissatisfaction with the view that these theorems ground deductive validity in model-theoretic validity, I turn to measurement theory as a source for an alternative view. For this purpose I present in the second section several of the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  24. Logic and Natural Language: Commitments and Constraints.Gil Sagi - 2020 - Disputatio 12 (58):377-408.
    In his new book, Logical Form, Andrea Iacona distinguishes between two different roles that have been ascribed to the notion of logical form: the logical role and the semantic role. These two roles entail a bifurcation of the notion of logical form. Both notions of logical form, according to Iacona, are descriptive, having to do with different features of natural language sentences. I agree that the notion of logical form bifurcates, but not that the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25.  8
    Logical Consequence and the Theory of Games.Paul Harrenstein - 2004 - Philosophia Scientiae 8 (2):179-193.
    Logical notions of consequence have frequently been related to game-theoretical solution concepts. The correspondence between a formula being classically valid and the existence of a winning strategy for a player in a related two-person game, has been most prominent in this context. We propose a conservative extension of the classical notion of consequence that is based on a generalization of the game-theoretical solution concept of Nash equilibrium.RésuméLes notions logiques de conséquence sont fréquemment reliées à des concepts de (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  26.  15
    Considerations on Logical Consequence and Natural Language.Gil Sagi - 2022 - Dialectica 999 (1).
    In a recent article, “Logical Consequence and Natural Language,” Michael Glanzberg claims that there is no relation of logical consequence in natural language (2015). The present paper counters that claim. I shall discuss Glanzberg’s arguments and show why they don’t hold. I further show how Glanzberg’s claims may be used to rather support the existence of logical consequence in natural language.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  27.  44
    Lessons from the logic of demonstratives: what indexicality teaches us about logic and vice versa.G. Russell - 2012 - In Greg Restall & Gillian Kay Russell (eds.), New Waves in Philosophical Logic. Palgrave-Macmillan.
    This paper looks at what David Kaplan's work on indexicals can teach us about logic and the philosophy of logic, and also what Kaplan's logic (i.e. the Logic of Demonstratives) can teach us about indexicals. The lessons are i) that logical consequence is not necessary truth-preservation, ii) that that the linguistic doctrine of necessary truth (also called conventionalism about modality) fails, and iii) that there is a kind of barrier to entailment between non-context-sensitive and context-sensitive claims.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  28.  6
    Logical Consequence and the Theory of Games.Paul Harrenstein - 2004 - Philosophia Scientae 8:179-193.
  29. Considerations on Logical Consequence and Natural Language.Gil Sagi - 2020 - Dialectica 74 (2).
    In a recent article, “Logical Consequence and Natural Language”, Michael Glanzberg claims that there is no relation of logical consequence in natural language (2015). The present paper counters that claim. I shall discuss Glanzberg’s arguments and show why they don’t hold. I further show how Glanzberg’s claims may be used to rather support the existence of logical consequence in natural language.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30. Logical Consequence: Its nature, structure, and application.Colin R. Caret & Ole T. Hjortland - 2015 - In Colin R. Caret & Ole T. Hjortland (eds.), Foundations of Logical Consequence. Oxford University Press.
    Recent work in philosophical logic has taken interesting and unexpected turns. It has seen not only a proliferation of logical systems, but new applications of a wide range of different formal theories to philosophical questions. As a result, philosophers have been forced to revisit the nature and foundation of core logical concepts, chief amongst which is the concept of logical consequence. This essay sets the contributions of the volume in context and identifies how they advance important (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  31.  11
    Tarski's Analysis of Logical Consequence and Etchemendy's Criticism of Tarski's Modal Fallacy.Dale Jacquette - 2006 - Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 89:345.
  32. Essence and logical properties.Hashem Morvarid - 2019 - Philosophical Studies 176 (11):2897-2917.
    Since Kit Fine presented his counter-examples to the standard versions of the modal view, many have been convinced that the standard versions of the modal view are not adequate. However, the scope of Fine's argument has not been fully appreciated. In this paper, I aim to carry Fine’s argument to its logical conclusion and argue that once we embrace the intuition underlying his counter-examples, we have to hold that properties obtained, totally or partially, by application of logical operations (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  33.  2
    Alethic Pluralism, Logical Consequence and the Universality of Reason.Michael P. Lynch - 2008 - In Peter A. French & Howard K. Wettstein (eds.), Midwest Studies in Philosophy. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. pp. 122–140.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction Mixed Inferences and Mixed Compounds Alethic Pluralism as Functionalism More than One Logic? Conclusion.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34. Alethic pluralism, logical consequence, and the universality of reason.Michael P. Lynch - 2008 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 32 (1):122-140.
  35.  47
    Perfect validity, entailment and paraconsistency.Neil Tennant - 1984 - Studia Logica 43 (1-2):181 - 200.
    This paper treats entailment as a subrelation of classical consequence and deducibility. Working with a Gentzen set-sequent system, we define an entailment as a substitution instance of a valid sequent all of whose premisses and conclusions are necessary for its classical validity. We also define a sequent Proof as one in which there are no applications of cut or dilution. The main result is that the entailments are exactly the Provable sequents. There are several important corollaries. Every (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  36.  53
    Supervaluationism, Modal Logic, and Weakly Classical Logic.Joshua Schechter - forthcoming - Journal of Philosophical Logic:1-51.
    A consequence relation is strongly classical if it has all the theorems and entailments of classical logic as well as the usual meta-rules (such as Conditional Proof). A consequence relation is weakly classical if it has all the theorems and entailments of classical logic but lacks the usual meta-rules. The most familiar example of a weakly classical consequence relation comes from a simple supervaluational approach to modelling vague language. This approach is formally equivalent to an account of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Logical consequence: Models and modality.Stewart Shapiro - 1998 - In Matthias Schirn (ed.), The Philosophy of Mathematics Today. Clarendon Press. pp. 131--156.
  38.  42
    Absolute and relative concepts in logic.Jaroslav Peregrin - manuscript
    It is a common wisdom that whereas consequence or entailment is a semantic concept, provability is a syntactic concept. However, what exactly does this mean? What is provability? In the traditional, intuitive sense, to prove something is to demonstrate its truth, and indeed the Latin word for proof is demonstratio. Hence in this sense, we cannot prove something unless it is true. Now in the course of his well known proof of the incompleteness of arithmetic, Gödel showed that (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  6
    Aristotle's Modal Logic: Essence and Entailment in the Organon. [REVIEW]Leo J. Elders - 1997 - Review of Metaphysics 50 (4):915-915.
    Quite a number of contemporary students of logic tend to consider Aristotle's logic mainly from a formal point of view. Richard Patterson, on the other hand, attempts to show that Aristotle's system of logic as well as his modal logic must be studied in the light of his fundamental theory of syntax and his metaphysics. Even if all of Aristotle's modal logic has not been accepted in the West, the ideas underpinning it are those of his syllogistic logic. Patterson observes (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  7
    Alethic Pluralism, Logical Consequence and the Universality of Reason.Michael R. Lynch - 2008 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 32 (1):122-140.
  41.  40
    Logical Pluralism and Logical Consequence.Erik Stei - 2023 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    Logical pluralism is the view that there is more than one correct logic. This is not necessarily a controversial claim but in its most exciting formulations, pluralism extends to logics that have typically been considered rival accounts of logical consequence – to logics, that is, which adopt seemingly contradictory views about basic logical laws or argument forms. The logical pluralist challenges the philosophical orthodoxy that an argument is either deductively valid or invalid by claiming that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  64
    Introduction: The philosophy of logical consequence and inference.Sten Lindström, Erik Palmgren & Dag Westerståhl - 2012 - Synthese 187 (3):817-820.
  43. Logical consequence, proof theory, and model theory.Stewart Shapiro - 2005 - In Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Mathematics and Logic. Oxford University Press. pp. 651--670.
    This chapter provides broad coverage of the notion of logical consequence, exploring its modal, semantic, and epistemic aspects. It develops the contrast between proof-theoretic notion of consequence, in terms of deduction, and a model-theoretic approach, in terms of truth-conditions. The main purpose is to relate the formal, technical work in logic to the philosophical concepts that underlie reasoning.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   58 citations  
  44.  29
    First-Degree Entailment and its Relatives.Yaroslav Shramko, Dmitry Zaitsev & Alexander Belikov - 2017 - Studia Logica 105 (6):1291-1317.
    We consider a family of logical systems for representing entailment relations of various kinds. This family has its root in the logic of first-degree entailment formulated as a binary consequence system, i.e. a proof system dealing with the expressions of the form \, where both \ and \ are single formulas. We generalize this approach by constructing consequence systems that allow manipulating with sets of formulas, either to the right or left of the turnstile. In (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  45. Richard Patterson, Aristotle's Modal Logic: Essence and Entailment in the Organon.A. Orenstein - 2000 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 8 (2):263-265.
  46. Logical Consequence: Between Formal and Natural Language (Dissertation).Gil Sagi - 2013 - Dissertation, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
  47.  23
    Presuppositions, Conditions, and Consequences.Trudy Govier - 1972 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 1 (4):443 - 456.
    An analysis of necessary condition and presupposition reveals that, as logical relations, these notions are basically similar to each other and different from the notion of entailment or other ‘if-then’ relations of logical consequence. Both necessary condition and presupposition seem to be two-directional in a rather peculiar way. Appreciating this is helpful in interpreting philosophers such as Kant and Strawson who have relied extensively on these relations in constructing the philosophical arguments often referred to as transcendental (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  48.  25
    Logic, Philosophy, and History.Intentional LogicTruth and Consequence in Mediaeval LogicStoic Logic.Manley Thompson - 1954 - Review of Metaphysics 8 (1):79 - 104.
    Both ways of looking at the history of logic as well as some of the issues that plague contemporary disputes over the nature of logic are illustrated in three recent books. Henry Veatch's Intentional Logic turns to a medieval Aristotelian philosophy as providing the framework for an adequate account of logical subject matter. Ernest Moody's Truth and Consequence in Mediaeval Logic borrows from the technical apparatus of present-day logicians in an endeavor to reassess what was once dismissed as (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. Logical Nihilism: Could There Be No Logic?Gillian Russell - 2018 - Philosophical Issues 28 (1):308-324.
    Logical monists and pluralists disagree about how many correct logics there are; the monists say there is just one, the pluralists that there are more. Could it turn out that both are wrong, and that there is no logic at all?
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  50. Consequences and Design in General and Transcendental Logic.Elena G. Dragalina-Chernaya - 2018 - Kantian Journal 37 (1):25-39.
1 — 50 / 1000