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  1.  45
    Is There a Duty to Vote?*: Loren E. Lomasky and Geoffrey Brennan.Loren E. Lomasky - 2000 - Social Philosophy and Policy 17 (1):62-86.
    The genre of public service advertisements that appear with two- and four-year cyclical regularity is familiar. Cameras pan across scenes of marines hoisting the flag on Iwo Jima, a bald eagle soaring in splendid flight, rows of grave markers at Arlington. The somber-voiced announcer remonstrates: “ They did their part; now you do yours.” Once again it is the season to fulfill one's civic duty, to vote.
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  2.  65
    Liberty After Lehman Brothers: Loren E. Lomasky.Loren E. Lomasky - 2011 - Social Philosophy and Policy 28 (2):135-165.
    The financial Crunch of 2008 was easily explained by both the left and right–too easily. Each insisted that events thoroughly confirmed its own long-held views and utterly refuted those of the opposed camp. This essay argues that there are indeed new lessons to be drawn from the Crunch, lessons that involve balancing the bounty of the Invisible Hand against perils of the Prisoner's Dilemma. Liberal moral imperatives are traced to variables of Personal Choice and External Cost that are typically in (...)
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  3. Libertarianism as If People Mattered*: LOREN E. LOMASKY.Loren E. Lomasky - 1998 - Social Philosophy and Policy 15 (2):350-371.
    In this essay I wish to consider the implications for theory and practice of the following two propositions, either or both of which may be controversial, but which will here be assumed for the sake of argument: Libertarianism is the correct framework for political morality. The vast majority of our fellow citizens disbelieve. 1.
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  4.  70
    The Paradox of Association: Loren E. Lomasky.Loren E. Lomasky - 2008 - Social Philosophy and Policy 25 (2):182-200.
    Individuals care deeply about with whom they associate and on what terms. A liberty to avoid entanglement in the disfavored designs of others is counterposed by an entitlement not to be excluded from valued modes of activity. These interests generate not one but two freedoms of association, the former negative and the latter positive. Often they conflict. This essay begins by setting out several respects in which negative free association is crucial to a liberal order and then examines several pleas (...)
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  5.  2
    The Impossibility of a Virtue Ethic.Loren E. Lomasky - 2019 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 22 (3):685-700.
    Virtue ethics is increasingly regarded as a viable alternative to consequentialist or deontological systems of normative ethics. This paper argues that there can be no such triumvirate of contending comprehensive ethical systems. That is not because virtue is unimportant but rather because genuine virtue is excellent and therefore rare. For most people in most morally salient situations there is no possibility of virtuous response because possession of the relevant virtues simply does not obtain nor can be usefully simulated. Instead, the (...)
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  6.  26
    Socialism as Classical Political Philosophy*: LOREN E. LOMASKY.Loren E. Lomasky - 1989 - Social Philosophy and Policy 6 (2):112-138.
    A small puzzle: the terms ‘capitalism’ and ‘socialism’ initially present themselves as contraries, the one affirming what the other rejects. However, once removed from the dictionary, they function otherwise. The theory of capitalism is very much contained within the science of economics. The positive theory of capitalistic institutions, but also its normative superstructure, rest most easily within the language and methodology of the economist. What distinguishes the free market? It is efficient ; allocation of factors of production are optimized ; (...)
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  7.  23
    Contract, Covenant, Constitution: Loren E. Lomasky.Loren E. Lomasky - 2011 - Social Philosophy and Policy 28 (1):50-71.
    Contract is the dominant model for political philosophy's understanding of government grounded on the consent of the governed. However, there are at least five disabilities attached to classical social contract theory: the grounding contract never actually occurred; its provisions are vague and contestable; the stringency of the obligation thereby established is dubious; trans-generational consent is questionable; interpretive methods for giving effect to the contract are ill-specified. By contrast, the biblical story of the covenant Israel embraces at Sinai is shown to (...)
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  8.  14
    Leibniz and the Modal Argument for God’s Existence.Loren E. Lomasky - 1970 - The Monist 54 (2):250-269.
    In this paper I shall concern myself with the ontological argument as found in Leibniz. In recent years several authors, notable among them Charles Hartshorne and Norman Malcolm, have contended that to speak of the ontological argument or the Anselmian argument is ambiguous, as in Anselm are to be found two logically independent ontological arguments. The more well-known version is from Proslogion II, and it takes existence as a perfection. This is the form of the argument rejected by Gaunilo, Aquinas, (...)
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  9. Are Compatibilism and the Free Will Defense Compatible?Loren E. Lomasky - 1975 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 56 (4):385.
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  10.  16
    Liberal Autonomy.Loren E. Lomasky - 1990 - Philosophy and Theology 4 (3):297-309.
    Theorists increasingly tum to autonomy as a grounding value for liberalism. This is, I argue, an iII-advised strategy. If autonomy is understood to differ from liberty insofar as it demands from agents significantly greater feats of self-determination, then it is not clear that autonomy is worth having. And, irrespective of whether autonomy is judged to be valuable, autonomy-based liberalisms eilher prescribe essentially the same constraints as classical liberalism - and thus are poIitically innocuous - or else require that the stale (...)
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  11.  13
    Being a Person - Does It Matter?Loren E. Lomasky - 1981 - Philosophical Topics 12 (3):139-152.
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  12.  9
    Is Actual Consequence Utilitarianism Incoherent?Loren E. Lomasky - 1978 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 16 (2):71-78.
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  13. Persons, Rights, and the Moral Community.Loren E. Lomasky - 1990 - Noûs 24 (4):627-631.
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  14.  8
    Persons, Rights, and the Moral Community.Loren E. Lomasky - 1989 - Ethics 99 (3):640-641.
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  15.  6
    Nominalism, Replication and Nelson Goodman.Loren E. Lomasky & Alonso Church - 1969 - Analysis 29 (5):156.
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  16.  5
    Are Property Rights Problematic?Gerald F. Gaus & Loren E. Lomasky - 1990 - The Monist 73 (4):483-503.
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  17. Persons, Rights, and the Moral Community.Loren E. Lomasky - 1989 - Mind 98 (392):652-657.
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