10 found
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  1.  35
    Assessing Decision-Making Capacity in the Behaviorally Nonresponsive Patient With Residual Covert Awareness.Andrew Peterson, Lorina Naci, Charles Weijer, Damian Cruse, Davinia Fernández-Espejo, Mackenzie Graham & Adrian M. Owen - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 4 (4):3-14.
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  2.  30
    An Ethics of Welfare for Patients Diagnosed as Vegetative With Covert Awareness.Mackenzie Graham, Charles Weijer, Damian Cruse, Davinia Fernandez-Espejo, Teneille Gofton, Laura E. Gonzalez-Lara, Andrea Lazosky, Lorina Naci, Loretta Norton, Andrew Peterson, Kathy N. Speechley, Bryan Young & Adrian M. Owen - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 6 (2):31-41.
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  3.  32
    Acknowledging Awareness: Informing Families of Individual Research Results for Patients in the Vegetative State.Mackenzie Graham, Charles Weijer, Andrew Peterson, Lorina Naci, Damian Cruse, Davinia Fernández-Espejo, Laura Gonzalez-Lara & Adrian M. Owen - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (7):534-538.
  4.  13
    A Principled Argument, But Not a Practical One.Andrew Peterson, Lorina Naci, Charles Weijer & Adrian M. Owen - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 4 (1):52-53.
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  5.  47
    Ethics of Neuroimaging After Serious Brain Injury.Charles Weijer, Andrew Peterson, Fiona Webster, Mackenzie Graham, Damian Cruse, Davinia Fernández-Espejo, Teneille Gofton, Laura E. Gonzalez-Lara, Andrea Lazosky, Lorina Naci, Loretta Norton, Kathy Speechley, Bryan Young & Adrian M. Owen - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):41.
    Patient outcome after serious brain injury is highly variable. Following a period of coma, some patients recover while others progress into a vegetative state (unresponsive wakefulness syndrome) or minimally conscious state. In both cases, assessment is difficult and misdiagnosis may be as high as 43%. Recent advances in neuroimaging suggest a solution. Both functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography have been used to detect residual cognitive function in vegetative and minimally conscious patients. Neuroimaging may improve diagnosis and prognostication. These techniques (...)
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  6.  36
    Toward a Science of Brain Death.Andrew Peterson, Loretta Norton, Lorina Naci, Adrian M. Owen & Charles Weijer - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (8):29-31.
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  7.  6
    From Awareness to Prognosis: Ethical Implications of Uncovering Hidden Awareness in Behaviorally Nonresponsive Patients.Mackenzie Graham, Eugene Wallace, Colin Doherty, Alison Mccann & Lorina Naci - 2019 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 28 (4):616-631.
    :Long-term patient outcomes after severe brain injury are highly variable, and reliable prognostic indicators are urgently needed to guide treatment decisions. Functional neuroimaging is a highly sensitive method of uncovering covert cognition and awareness in patients with prolonged disorders of consciousness, and there has been increased interest in using it as a research tool in acutely brain injured patients. When covert awareness is detected in a research context, this may impact surrogate decisionmaking—including decisions about life-sustaining treatment—even though the prognostic value (...)
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  8. While You Were Sleeping: Evidence for High-Level Executive Processing of an Auditory Narrative During Sleep.Stuart Fogel, Laura Ray, Zhuo Fang, Max Silverbrook, Lorina Naci & Adrian M. Owen - 2022 - Consciousness and Cognition 100:103306.
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  9.  5
    Memory During the Presumed Vegetative State: Implications for Patient Quality of Life.Nicola Taylor, Mackenzie Graham, Mark Delargy & Lorina Naci - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (4):501-510.
    A growing number of studies show that a significant proportion of patients, who meet the clinical criteria for the diagnosis of the vegetative state, demonstrate evidence of covert awareness through successful performance of neuroimaging tasks. Despite these important advances, the day-to-day life experiences of any such patient remain unknown. This presents a major challenge for optimizing the patient’s standard of care and quality of life. We describe a patient who, following emergence from a state of complete behavioral unresponsiveness and a (...)
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  10.  2
    Well-Being After Severe Brain Injury: What Counts as Good Recovery?Mackenzie Graham & Lorina Naci - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (4):613-622.
    Disorders of consciousness continue to profoundly challenge both families and medical professionals. Once a brain-injured patient has been stabilized, questions turn to the prospect of recovery. However, what “recovery” means in the context of patients with prolonged DOC is not always clear. Failure to recognize potential differences of interpretation—and the assumptions about the relationship between health and well-being that underlie these differences—can inhibit communication between surrogate decisionmakers and a patient’s clinical team, and make it difficult to establish the goals of (...)
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