60 found
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  1.  51
    Naturalism, Normativity, and Scepticism in Hume's Account of Belief.Lorne Falkenstein - 1997 - Hume Studies 23 (1):29-72.
  2.  27
    The Role of Material Impressions in Reid's Theory of Vision: A Critique of Gideon Yaffe's “Reid on the Perception of the Visible Figure”.Lorne Falkenstein & Giovanni B. Grandi - 2003 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 1 (2):117-133.
    Reid maintained that the perceptions that we obtain from the senses of smell, taste, hearing, and touch are ‘suggested’ by corresponding sensations. However, he made an exception for the sense of vision. According to Reid, our perceptions of the real figure, position, and magnitude of bodies are suggested by their visible appearances, which are not sensations but objects of perception in their own right. These visible appearances have figure, position, and magnitude, as well as ‘colour,’ and the standard view among (...)
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  3. Hume's Answer to Kant.Lorne Falkenstein - 1998 - Noûs 32 (3):331-360.
  4.  50
    Hume's Project in ‘The Natural History of Religion’.Lorne Falkenstein - 2003 - Religious Studies 39 (1):1-21.
    There are good reasons to think that at least a part of Hume's project in the ‘The natural history of religion’ was to buttress a philosophical critique of the reasonableness of religious belief undertaken in other works, and to attack a fundamentalist account of the history of religion and the foundations of morality. But there are also problems with supposing that Hume intended to achieve either of these goals. I argue that two problems in particular – accounting for Hume's neglect (...)
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  5.  26
    Reid's Account of Localization.Lorne Falkenstein - 2000 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 61 (2):305-328.
    This paper contrasts three different positions taken by 18th century British scholars on how sensations, particularly sensations of colour and touch, come to be localized in space: Berkeley’s view that we learn to localize ideas of colour by associating certain purely qualitative features of those ideas with ideas of touch and motion, Hume’s view that visual and tangible impressions are originally disposed in space, and Reid’s view that we are innately disposed to refer appearances of colour to the end of (...)
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  6. Reid's Critique of Berkeley's Position on the Inverted Image.Lorne Falkenstein - 2000 - Reid Studies 4:35-51.
     
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  7.  50
    Condillac's Paradox.Lorne Falkenstein - 2005 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 43 (4):403-435.
    : I argue that Condillac was committed to four mutually inconsistent propositions: that the mind is unextended, that sensations are modifications of the mind, that colours are sensations, and that colours are extended. I argue that this inconsistency was not just the blunder of a second-rate philosopher, but the consequence of a deep-seated tension in the views of early modern philosophers on the nature of the mind, sensation, and secondary qualities and that more widely studied figures, notably Condillac's contemporaries, Hume (...)
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  8.  58
    Kant's Argument for the Non-Spatiotemporality of Things in Themselves.Lorne Falkenstein - 1989 - Kant-Studien 80 (1-4):265-283.
  9.  15
    Kant’s First Argument in the Metaphysical Expositions.Lorne Falkenstein - 1989 - Proceedings of the Sixth International Kant Congress 2 (1):219-227.
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  10.  49
    Hume on Manners of Disposition and the Ideas of Space and Time.Lorne Falkenstein - 1997 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 79 (2):179-201.
  11.  49
    Intuition and Construction in Berkeley's Account of Visual Space.Lorne Falkenstein - 1994 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 32 (1):63-84.
  12.  14
    Reid and Smith on Vision.Lorne Falkenstein - 2004 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 2 (2):103-118.
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  13.  20
    Hume and Reid on the Perception of Hardness.Lorne Falkenstein - 2002 - Hume Studies 28 (1):27-48.
    This paper considers an objection to the Humean view that perception involves introspective acquaintance with representative images. The objection, originally raised by Thomas Reid and recently endorsed by Nicholas Wolterstorff, states that no representative image can be hard, and concludes that acquaintance with such images cannot therefore account for our perception of hardness. I argue in response that a case has not been made for denying that representative images can be hard. Hardness, as understood by Hume and Reid, is the (...)
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  14.  47
    Hume's Seneca Reference in Dialogues 12: An Assessment of Alternatives.Lorne Falkenstein - 2012 - Hume Studies 38 (1):101-104.
    In section 12 of the Dialogues, Hume claimed, without reference, that Seneca had written that to know God is to worship him. His source has proven hard to find. This note identifies some possibilities and argues in favour of one of them—one that has not been recognized by recent editors of the Dialogues.
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  15.  3
    Without Gallantry and Without Jealousy: The Development of Hume's Account of Sexual Virtues and Vices.Lorne Falkenstein - 2015 - Hume Studies 41 (2):137-170.
    "If any false opinion, embraced from appearances, has been found to prevail; as soon as farther experience and sounder reasoning have given us juster notions of human affairs; we retract our first sentiment, and adjust anew the boundaries of moral good and evil."In this paper I argue that Hume's thought on comportment between the sexes developed over time.2 In the Treatise, he was interested in explaining why the world seeks to impose artificial virtues of chastity and modesty on women and (...)
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  16.  29
    Hume and Reid on the Simplicity of the Soul.Lorne Falkenstein - 1995 - Hume Studies 21 (1):25-45.
    Reid is well known for rejecting the "philosophy of ideas"--a theory of mental representation that he claimed to find in its most vitriolic form in Hume. But there was another component of Hume's philosophy that exerted an equally powerful influence on Reid: Hume's attack on the notion of spiritual substance in _Treatise 1.4.5. I summarize this neglected aspect of Hume's philosophy and argue that much of Reid's epistemology can be explained as an attempt to buttress dualism against the effects of (...)
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  17.  45
    Kant's Account of Sensation.Lorne Falkenstein - 1990 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 20 (1):63 - 88.
  18.  20
    Was Kant a Nativist?Lorne Falkenstein - 1990 - Journal of the History of Ideas 51 (4):573-597.
  19.  16
    Space and Time.Lorne Falkenstein - 2006 - In Saul Traiger (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Hume's Treatise. Blackwell. pp. 59--76.
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  20.  38
    A Double Edged Sword? Kant's Refutation of Mendelssohn's Proof of the Immortality of the Soul and its Implications for His Theory of Matter.Lorne Falkenstein - 1998 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 29 (4):561-588.
  21.  86
    Kant, Mendelssohn, Lambert, and the Subjectivity of Time.Lorne Falkenstein - 1991 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 29 (2):227-251.
  22.  31
    Debate: Langton on Things in Themselves: Critique of Kantian Humility.Lorne Falkenstein - 2001 - Kantian Review 5 (1):49.
    Rae Langton's main purpose in Kantian Humility is to uncover the reasons that led Kant to claim that we can have no knowledge of things in themselves. As part of this effort, she articulates and attempts to defend a novel and intriguing position on what things in themselves are for Kant, and what it means for him to deny knowledge of them. Though the presentation of these views is lucid and informed by selective citation from a range of Kant's works, (...)
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  23.  55
    Is Perceptual Space Monadic?Lorne Falkenstein - 1989 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 49 (June):709-713.
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  24.  30
    Nativism and the Nature of Thought in Reid's Account of Our Knowledge of the External World.Lorne Falkenstein - 2004 - In Terence Cuneo Rene van Woudenberg (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Thomas Reid. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 156--179.
  25.  19
    Reid’s Account of the “Geometry of Visibles”: Some Lessons From Helmholtz.Lorne Falkenstein - forthcoming - Topoi:1-26.
    Drawing on work done by Helmholtz, I argue that Reid was in no position to infer that objects appear as if projected on the inner surface of a sphere, or that they have the geometric properties of such projections even though they do not look concave towards the eye. A careful consideration of the phenomena of visual experience, as further illuminated by the practice of visual artists, should have led him to conclude that the sides of visible appearances either look (...)
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  26.  33
    Kant's Account of Intuition.Lorne Falkenstein - 1991 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 21 (2):165 - 193.
  27. Kant's Critique of Pure Reason: Critical Essays.Harry Allison, Karl Ameriks, Lewis White Beck, Lorne Falkenstein, Paul Guyer, Philip Kitcher, Charles Parsons, P. F. Strawson & Allen W. Wood - 1998 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    The central project of the Critique of Pure Reason is to answer two sets of questions: What can we know and how can we know it? and What can't we know and why can't we know it? The essays in this collection are intended to help students read the Critique of Pure Reason with a greater understanding of its central themes and arguments, and with some awareness of important lines of criticism of those themes and arguments.
     
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  28.  10
    Humean Contiguity.Lorne Falkenstein & David Welton - 2001 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 18 (3):279 - 296.
  29.  6
    Dualism And The Experimentum Crucis.Lorne Falkenstein - 2016 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 93 (1):212-217.
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  30.  49
    Hume and Baxter on Identity Over Time. [REVIEW]Lorne Falkenstein - 2009 - Philosophical Studies 146 (3):425 - 433.
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  31.  13
    Hume on the Idea of a Vacuum.Lorne Falkenstein - 2013 - Hume Studies 39 (2):131-168.
    Hume had two principal arguments for denying that we can have an idea of a vacuum, an argument from the non-entity of unqualified points and an argument from the impossibility of forming abstract ideas of manners of disposition. He also made two serious concessions to the opposed view that we can indeed form ideas of vacua, namely, that bodies that have nothing sensible disposed between them may permit the interposition of other bodies without any apparent motion or occlusion and that (...)
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  32.  32
    Kant's Empiricism.Lorne Falkenstein - 1997 - Review of Metaphysics 50 (3):547 - 589.
  33.  8
    Reid's Response to Hume's Perceptual Relativity Argument.Lorne Falkenstein - 2011 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (Supplement 1):25-49.
  34.  17
    Hume's Finite Geometry: A Reply to Mark Pressman.Lorne Falkenstein - 2000 - Hume Studies 26 (1):183-185.
  35.  30
    Berkeley's Argument for Other Minds.Lorne Falkenstein - 1990 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 7 (4):431 - 440.
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  36.  12
    Hume's Reason.Lorne Falkenstein - 2003 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 67 (1):233-236.
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  37. A Double Edged Sword? Kant's Refutation Of Mendelssohn's Proof Of The Immortality Of The Soul And Its Implications For His Theory Of Matter.Lorne Falkenstein - 1998 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 29 (4):561-588.
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  38.  20
    Reading Hume on Human Understanding.Lorne Falkenstein - 2004 - Hume Studies 30 (1):183-187.
  39.  14
    Reading Hume on Human Understanding: Essays on the First Enquiry (Review).Lorne Falkenstein - 2004 - Hume Studies 30 (1):183-187.
  40.  24
    Localizing Sensations: A Reply to Anthony Quinton's Trouble with Kant.Lorne Falkenstein - 1998 - Philosophy 73 (3):479-489.
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  41.  13
    Hume's Finite Geometry.Lorne Falkenstein - 2000 - Hume Studies 26 (1):183-185.
  42.  16
    Étienne Bonnot de Condillac.Lorne Falkenstein & Giovanni B. Grandi - 2017 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  43.  10
    Space and the Self in Hume's Treatise. [REVIEW]Lorne Falkenstein - 1999 - Hume Studies 25 (1/2):241-249.
  44. An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding.Lorne Falkenstein (ed.) - 1848 - Broadview Press.
    Over a series of elegantly written, engaging essays, the Enquiry examines the experiential and psychological sources of meaning and knowledge, the foundations of reasoning about matters that lie beyond the scope of our sensory experience and memory, the nature of belief, and the limitations of our knowledge. The positions Hume takes on these topics have been described as paradigmatically empiricist, sceptical, and naturalist and have been widely influential and even more widely decried. The introduction to this edition discusses the Enquiry's (...)
     
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  45.  1
    Kant’s Account of Sensation.Lorne Falkenstein - 1990 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 20 (1):63-88.
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  46.  8
    Book Review:Particles and Ideas: Bishop Berkeley's Corpuscularian Philosophy Gabriel Moked. [REVIEW]Lorne Falkenstein - 1991 - Philosophy of Science 58 (1):133-.
  47.  6
    The Natural and the Normative.Lorne Falkenstein - 1993 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 53 (2):476-480.
  48. An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding.Lorne Falkenstein (ed.) - 1848 - Broadview Press.
    Over a series of elegantly written, engaging essays, the _Enquiry_ examines the experiential and psychological sources of meaning and knowledge, the foundations of reasoning about matters that lie beyond the scope of our sensory experience and memory, the nature of belief, and the limitations of our knowledge. The positions Hume takes on these topics have been described as paradigmatically empiricist, sceptical, and naturalist and have been widely influential and even more widely decried. The introduction to this edition discusses the _Enquiry_’s (...)
     
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  49. Essays and Treatises on Philosophical Subjects.Lorne Falkenstein & Neil McArthur (eds.) - 2013 - Broadview Press.
    This is the first edition in over a century to present David Hume’s _Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding_, _Dissertation on the Passions_, _Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals_, and _Natural History of Religion_ in the format he intended: collected together in a single volume. Hume has suffered a fate unusual among great philosophers. His principal philosophical work is no longer published in the form in which he intended it to be read. It has been divided into separate parts, only some of (...)
     
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  50. Hume’s Finite Geometry: A Reply to Mark Pressman.Lorne Falkenstein - 2000 - Hume Studies 26 (1):183-185.
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