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    Causation, Extrinsic Relations, and Hume's Second Thoughts About Personal Identity.Louis E. Loeb - 1992 - Hume Studies 18 (2):219-231.
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  2. Hume’s Agent-Centered Sentimentalism.Louis E. Loeb - 2003 - Philosophical Topics 31 (1/2):309-341.
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  3. Integrating Hume’s Accounts of Belief and Justification.Louis E. Loeb - 2001 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (2):279-303.
    Hume’s claim that a state is a belief is often intertwined---though without his remarking on this fact---with epistemic approval of the state. This requires explanation. Beliefs, in Hume’s view, are steady dispositions, nature’s provision for a steady influence on the will and action. Hume’s epistemic distinctions call attention to circumstances in which the presence of conflicting beliefs undermine a belief’s influence and thereby its natural function. On one version of this interpretation, to say that a belief is justified, ceteris paribus, (...)
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  4. Stability and Justification in Hume's Treatise.E. Loeb Louis - 2002 - Oxford University Press USA.
    In his Treatise, Hume confronted the tensions between his project of uncovering the causal operations of the human mind and the extreme skeptical tendencies of his system. Louis Loeb argues that Hume overreaches, and he advances a controversial interpretation of Hume's epistemological framework that shows how Hume could have avoided the more destructive positions in his work.
     
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  5. Stability, Justification, and Hume’s Propensity to Ascribe Identity to Related Objects.Louis E. Loeb - 1991 - Philosophical Topics 19 (1):237-270.
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