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  1. Positive and Negative Correlates of Feeding Innovations in Birds: Evidence for Limited Modularity.Louis Lefebvre & Johan J. Bolhuis - 2003 - In Simon M. Reader & Kevin N. Laland (eds.), Animal Innovation. Oxford University Press.
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  2.  15
    Comparing Cognition Across Species.Simon M. Reader, Daniel Sol & Louis Lefebvre - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (9):411.
  3.  3
    Feeding Innovations and Their Cultural Transmission in Bird Populations.Louis Lefebvre - 2000 - In Celia Heyes & Ludwig Huber (eds.), The Evolution of Cognition. MIT Press. pp. 311--328.
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  4.  9
    Can a Restrictive Definition Lead to Biases and Tautologies?Luc-Alain Giraldeau, Louis Lefebvre & Julie Morand-Ferron - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (4):411-412.
    We argue that the operational definition proposed by Ramsey et al. does not represent a significant improvement for students of innovation, because it is so restrictive that it might actually prevent the testing of hypotheses on the relationships between innovation, ecology, evolution, culture, and intelligence. To avoid tautological thinking, we need to use an operational definition that is taxonomically unbiased and neutral with respect to the hypotheses to be tested.
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  5.  12
    Social Learning and Sociality.Simon M. Reader & Louis Lefebvre - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (2):353-355.
    Sociality may not be a defining feature of social learning. Complex social systems have been predicted to favour the evolution of social learning, but the evidence for this relationship is weak. In birds, only one study supports the hypothesis that social learning is an adaptive specialisation to social living. In nonhuman primates, social group size and social learning frequency are not correlated. Though cetaceans may prove an exception, they provide a useful group with which to test these ideas.
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