27 found
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  1. Clinical Pragmatics.Louise Cummings - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    Many children and adults experience significant breakdown in the use of language. The resulting pragmatic disorders present a considerable barrier to effective communication. This book is the first critical examination of the current state of our knowledge of pragmatic disorders and provides a comprehensive overview of the main concepts and theories in pragmatics. It examines the full range of pragmatic disorders that occur in children and adults and discusses how they are assessed and treated by clinicians. Louise Cummings attempts to (...)
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  2.  50
    Pragmatics: A Multidisciplinary Perspective.Louise Cummings - 2005 - L. Erlbaum Associates.
    The first truly multidisciplinary text of its kind, this book offers an original analysis of the current state of linguistic pragmatics. Cummings argues that no study of pragmatics can reasonably neglect the historical and contemporary influences on this.
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  3.  48
    Reasoning Under Uncertainty: The Role of Two Informal Fallacies in an Emerging Scientific Inquiry.Louise Cummings - 2002 - Informal Logic 22 (2).
    lt is now commonplace in fallacy inquiry for many of the traditional informal fallacies to be viewed as reasonable or nonfallacious modes of argument. Central to this evaluative shift has been the attempt to examine traditional fallacies within their wider contexts of use. However, this pragmatic turn in fallacy evaluation is still in its infancy. The true potential of a contextual approach in the evaluation of the fallacies is yet to be explored. I examine how, in the context of scientific (...)
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  4.  12
    Theory of Mind in Utterance Interpretation: The Case From Clinical Pragmatics.Louise Cummings - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  5.  32
    Informal Fallacies as Cognitive Heuristics in Public Health Reasoning.Louise Cummings - 2014 - Informal Logic 34 (1):1-37.
    The public must make assessments of a range of health-related issues. However, these assessments require scientific know-ledge which is often lacking or ineffectively utilized by the public. Lay people must use whatever cognitive resources are at their disposal to come to judgement on these issues. It will be contended that a group of arguments—so-called informal fallacies—are a valuable cognitive resource in this regard. These arguments serve as cognitive heuristics which facilitate reasoning when knowledge is limited or beyond the grasp of (...)
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  6.  21
    Emerging Infectious Diseases: Coping with Uncertainty. [REVIEW]Louise Cummings - 2009 - Argumentation 23 (2):171-188.
    The world’s scientific community must be in a state of constant readiness to address the threat posed by newly emerging infectious diseases. Whether the disease in question is SARS in humans or BSE in animals, scientists must be able to put into action various disease containment measures when everything from the causative pathogen to route(s) of transmission is essentially uncertain. A robust epistemic framework, which will inform decision-making, is required under such conditions of uncertainty. I will argue that this framework (...)
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  7.  5
    Analogical Reasoning as a Tool of Epidemiological Investigation.Louise Cummings - 2004 - Argumentation 18 (4):427-444.
    Few, if any, scientific inquiries are conducted against a background of complete knowledge, a background in which inquirers are in possession of the ‘full facts’ that relate to a particular question or issue. More often than not, scientists are compelled to conduct their deliberations in contexts of epistemic uncertainty, in which partial knowledge or even a total absence of knowledge characterise inquiry. Nowhere is this epistemic uncertainty more evident, or indeed more successfully controlled, than in the branch of scientific inquiry (...)
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  8. Rejecting Theorizing in Philosophy: The Urgency of Putnamian Dialectic.Louise Cummings - 2002 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 16 (2):117-141.
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  9.  13
    Giving Science a Bad Name: Politically and Commercially Motivated Fallacies in BSE Inquiry.Louise Cummings - 2005 - Argumentation 19 (2):123-143.
    It is a feature of scientific inquiry that it proceeds alongside a multitude of non-scientific interests. This statement is as true of the scientific inquiries of previous centuries, many of which brought scientists into conflict with institutionalised religious thinking, as it is true of the scientific inquiries of today, which are conducted increasingly within commercial and political contexts. However, while the fact of the coexistence of scientific and non-scientific interests has changed little over time, what has changed with time is (...)
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  10.  46
    The Use of 'No Evidence' Statements in Public Health.Louise Cummings - 2015 - Informal Logic 35 (4):32-64.
    Public health communication makes extensive use of a linguistic formulation that will be called the “no evidence” statement. This is a written or spoken statement of the form “There is no evidence that P” where P stands for a proposition that typically describes a human health risk. Danger lurks in these expressions for the hearer or reader who is not logically perspicacious, as arguments that use them are only warranted under certain conditions. The extent to which members of the public (...)
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  11.  43
    Scaring the Public: Fear Appeal Arguments in Public Health Reasoning.Louise Cummings - 2012 - Informal Logic 32 (1):25-50.
    The study of threat and fear appeal arguments has given rise to a sizeable literature. Even within a public health context, much is now known about how these arguments work to gain the public’s compliance with health recommendations. Notwithstanding this level of interest in, and examination of, these arguments, there is one aspect of these arguments that still remains unexplored. That aspect concerns the heuristic function of these arguments within our thinking about public health problems. Specifically, it is argued that (...)
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  12.  15
    Analogical Reasoning as a Tool of Epidemiological Investigation.Louise Cummings - 2004 - Argumentation 18 (4):427-444.
    Few, if any, scientific inquiries are conducted against a background of complete knowledge, a background in which inquirers are in possession of the ‘full facts’ that relate to a particular question or issue. More often than not, scientists are compelled to conduct their deliberations in contexts of epistemic uncertainty, in which partial knowledge or even a total absence of knowledge characterise inquiry. Nowhere is this epistemic uncertainty more evident, or indeed more successfully controlled, than in the branch of scientific inquiry (...)
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  13.  15
    Analogical Reasoning in Public Health.Louise Cummings - 2014 - Journal of Argumentation in Context 3 (2):169-197.
    Analogical reasoning is a valuable logical resource in a public health context. It is used extensively by public health scientists in risk assessments of new technologies, environmental hazards and infectious diseases. For its part, the public also avails of analogical reasoning when it assesses a range of public health problems. In this article, some of these uses of analogical reasoning in public health are examined. Analogical arguments have courted approval and disapproval in roughly equal measure by a long succession of (...)
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  14.  3
    Establishing Diganostic Criteria: The Role of Clinical Pragmatics.Louise Cummings - 2012 - Lodz Papers in Pragmatics 8 (1):61-84.
    The study of pragmatic disorders is of interest to speech-language pathologists who have a professional responsibility to assess and treat communication impairments. However, these disorders, it will be argued in this paper, have a significance beyond the clinical management of clients with communication impairments. Specifically, pragmatic disorders can now make a contribution to the diagnosis of a range of clinical conditions in which communication is adversely affected. These conditions include attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, the autistic spectrum disorders, schizophrenia and the (...)
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  15.  5
    Theorising Context.Louise Cummings - 2012 - In Rita Finkbeiner, Jörg Meibauer & Petra Schumacher (eds.), What is a Context?: Linguistic Approaches and Challenges. John Benjamins. pp. 196--55.
  16.  42
    Justifying Practical Reason: What Chaïm Perelman's New Rhetoric Can Learn From Frege's Attack on Psychologism.Louise Cummings - 2002 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 35 (1):50-76.
  17.  4
    Describing the Cookie Theft Picture.Louise Cummings - 2019 - Pragmatics and Society 10 (2):153-176.
    Speech-language pathologists routinely use picture description tasks to assess expository discourse in clients with disorders such as aphasia and dementia. One picture description task – the Cookie Theft picture from the Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination – has come to dominate clinical settings more than any other task. In this article, I examine why this particular picture description task has proven to be so successful in assessing expository discourse in clients with language and cognitive disorders. Using data from the University of (...)
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  18.  25
    Hilary Putnam's Dialectical Thinking: An Application to Fallacy Theory. [REVIEW]Louise Cummings - 2002 - Argumentation 16 (2):197-229.
    In recent and not so recent years, fallacy theory has sustained numerous challenges, challenges which have seen the theory charged with lack of systematicity as well as failure to deliver significant insights into its subject matter. In the following discussion, I argue that these criticisms are subordinate to a more fundamental criticism of fallacy theory, a criticism pertaining to the lack of intelligibility of this theory. The charge of unintelligibility against fallacy theory derives from a similar charge against philosophical theories (...)
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  19.  19
    Rejecting the Urge to Theorise in Fallacy Inquiry.Louise Cummings - 2004 - Argumentation 18 (1):61-94.
    In this paper, I examine the incessant call to theory that is evident in fallacy inquiry. I relate the motivations for this call to a desire to attain for fallacy inquiry certain attributes of the theoretical process in scientific inquiry. I argue that these same attributes, when pursued in the context of philosophical inquiry in general and fallacy inquiry in particular, lead to the assumption of a metaphysical standpoint. This standpoint, I contend, is generative of unintelligibility in philosophical discussions of (...)
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  20.  11
    Interpreting Putnam's Dialectical Method in Philosophy.Louise Cummings - 2005 - Metaphilosophy 36 (4):476-489.
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  21.  52
    Self-Refutations and Much More: The Dialectical Thinking of Hilary Putnam.Louise Cummings - 2001 - Theoria 16 (2):237-268.
    In the following discussion, I examine what constitutes the dialectical strain in Putnam’s thought. As part of this examination, I consider Putnam’s criticism of the fact/value dichotomy. I compare this criticism to Putnam’s analysis of the metaphysical realist’s position, a position which has occupied Putnam’s thinking more than any other philosophical stance. I describe how Putnam pursues a chargeof self-refutation against the metaphysical realist and against the proponent of a fact/value dichotomy, a charge which assumes dialectical significance. So it is (...)
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  22.  15
    Why We Need to Avoid Theorizing About Rationality: A Putnamian Criticism of Habermas's Epistemology.Louise Cummings - 2001 - Social Epistemology 16 (2):117 – 131.
  23.  26
    Mind and Body, Form and Content: How Not to Do Petitio Principii Analysis.Louise Cummings - 2000 - Philosophical Papers 29 (2):73-105.
    Abstract Few theoretical insights have emerged from the extensive literature discussions of petitio principii argument. In particular, the pattern of petitio analysis has largely been one of movement between the two sides of a dichotomy, that of form and content. In this paper, I trace the basis of this dichotomy to a dualist conception of mind and world. I argue for the rejection of the form/content dichotomy on the ground that its dualist presuppositions generate a reductionist analysis of certain concepts (...)
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  24.  21
    Pragmatic Disorders and Their Social Impact.Louise Cummings - 2011 - Pragmatics and Society 2 (1):17-36.
    Pragmatic disorders in children and adults have been the focus of clinical investigations for approximately 40 years. In that time, clinicians and researchers have established a diverse range of pragmatic phenomena that are disrupted in these disorders. Pragmatic deficits include problems with the use and understanding of speech acts, the processing of non-literal language, failure to adhere to Gricean maxims in conversation and discourse deficits. These deficits are found in several clinical populations including individuals with autistic spectrum disorders, schizophrenia, traumatic (...)
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  25.  14
    Formal Dialectic in Fallacy Inquiry: An Unintelligible Circumscription of Argumentative Rationality? [REVIEW]Louise Cummings - 2003 - Argumentation 17 (2):161-183.
    Since its inception in the work on fallacies of Charles Hamblin, formal dialectic has been the object of an unparalleled level of optimism concerning the potential of its analytical contribution to fallacy inquiry. This optimism has taken the form of a rapid proliferation of formal dialectical studies of arguments in general and fallacious arguments in particular under the auspices of theorists such as Jim Mackenzie and John Woods and Douglas Walton, to name but a few. Notwithstanding the interest in, and (...)
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  26.  14
    Argument as Cognition: A Putnamian Criticism of Dale Hample’s Cognitive Conception of Argument.Louise Cummings - 2004 - Argumentation 18 (3):191-209.
    The study of argument has never before been so wide-ranging. The evidence for this claim is to be found in a growing number of different conceptions of argument, each of which purports to describe some component of argument that is effectively over-looked by other conceptions of this notion. Just this same sense that a vital component of argument is being overlooked by current conceptions of this notion is what motivates Dale Hample to pursue a specifically cognitive conception of argument. However, (...)
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  27.  7
    Further Advances in Pragmatics and Philosophy: Part 2 Theories and Applications.Grazia Basile, Antonino Bucca, Brian E. Butler, Alessandro Capone, Louise Cummings, Igor Douven, Alessandra Falzone, Melvin González-Rivera, Mitchell Green, Jeffrey S. Helmreich, Istvan Kecskes, Francesco La Mantia, Paolo Leonardi, Congyi Liu, Fabrizio Macagno, Mostafa Morady Moghaddam, Antonino Pennisi, Paola Pennisi, Francesca Piazza, Francesca Poggi, Maria Pia Pozzato, Paul Saka, Sara Schatz, Stephen Schiffer, Caterina Scianna, Alberto Voltolini, Douglas Walton, Richard Warner, Howard Wettstein, Jonathan R. White, Jock Wong & Dorota Zielińska (eds.) - 2019 - Springer Verlag.
    Introduction: The two sections of this volume present theoretical developments and practical applicative papers respectively. Theoretical papers cover topics such as intercultural pragmatics, evolutionism, argumentation theory, pragmatics and law, the semantics/pragmatics debate, slurs, and more. The applied papers focus on topics such as pragmatic disorders, mapping places of origin, stance-taking, societal pragmatics, and cultural linguistics. This is the second volume of invited papers that were presented at the inaugural Pragmasofia conference in Palermo in 2016, and like its predecessor presents papers (...)
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