Results for 'Louise Fiona Richardson'

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  1.  68
    Symposium on Louise Richardson’s “Flavour, Taste and Smell”.Louise Richardson, Fiona Macpherson, Mohan Matthen & Matthew Nudds - 2013 - Mind and Language Symposia at the Brains Blog.
  2.  37
    The Senses: Classic and Contemporary Philosophical Perspectives. Edited by Fiona Macpherson. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2011. Pp. 448. Price £18.99.). [REVIEW]Louise Richardson - 2012 - Philosophical Quarterly 62 (248):651-653.
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  3.  31
    The Rationality of Perception, by Susanna Siegel. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017, Xxv + 221 Pp. ISBN 978‐0‐19‐879708‐1 Hb £35.00. [REVIEW]Louise Richardson - 2018 - European Journal of Philosophy 26 (3):1191-1194.
  4. Sniffing and Smelling.Louise Richardson - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 162 (2):401-419.
    In this paper I argue that olfactory experience, like visual experience, is exteroceptive: it seems to one that odours, when one smells them, are external to the body, as it seems to one that objects are external to the body when one sees them. Where the sense of smell has been discussed by philosophers, it has often been supposed to be non-exteroceptive. The strangeness of this philosophical orthodoxy makes it natural to ask what would lead to its widespread acceptance. I (...)
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  5. Seeing Empty Space.Louise Richardson - 2010 - European Journal of Philosophy 18 (2):227-243.
    Abstract: In this paper I offer an account of a particular variety of perception of absence, namely, visual perception of empty space. In so doing, I aim to make explicit the role that seeing empty space has, implicitly, in Mike Martin's account of the visual field. I suggest we should make sense of the claim that vision has a field—in Martin's sense—in terms of our being aware of its limitations or boundaries. I argue that the limits of the visual field (...)
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  6. Bodily Sensation and Tactile Perception.Louise Richardson - 2013 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 86 (1):134-154.
  7. Flavour, Taste and Smell.Louise Richardson - 2013 - Mind and Language 28 (3):322-341.
    I consider the role of psychology and other sciences in telling us about our senses, via the issue of whether empirical findings show us that flavours are perceived partly with the sense of smell. I argue that scientific findings do not establish that we're wrong to think that flavours are just tasted. Non-naturalism, according to which our everyday conception of the senses does not involve empirical commitments of a kind that could be corrected by empirical findings is, I suggest, a (...)
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  8.  82
    Space, Time and Molyneux's Question.Louise Richardson - 2014 - Ratio 27 (4):483-505.
    Whatever the answer to Molyneux's question is, it is certainly not obvious that the answer is ‘yes’. In contrast, it seems clear that we should answer affirmatively a temporal variation on Molyneux's question, introduced by Gareth Evans. I offer a phenomenological explanation of this asymmetry in our responses to the two questions. This explanation appeals to the modality-specific spatial structure of perceptual experience and its amodal temporal structure. On this explanation, there are differences in the perception of spatial properties in (...)
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  9.  6
    Odours as Olfactibilia.Louise Richardson - 2018 - In Thomas Crowther & Clare Mac Cumhaill (eds.), Perceptual Ephemera. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 93-114.
    It is natural to think that sight is distinctive amongst the senses in that we typically see ordinary objects directly, rather than seeing a visual equivalent to a sound or odour. It is also natural to think that sounds and odours (like rainbows and holograms) are sensibilia, in that they are each intimately related to just one of our senses. In this chapter, I defend these natural-seeming claims. I present a view on which odours are indeed sensibilia, a claim that (...)
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  10.  38
    IX—Perceptual Activity and Bodily Awareness.Louise Richardson - 2015 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 115 (2pt2):147-165.
    Bodily awareness is a kind of perceptual awareness of the body that we do not usually count as a sense. I argue that that there is an overlooked agential difference between bodily awareness and perception in the five familiar senses: a difference in what is involved in perceptual activity in sight, hearing, touch taste and smell on the one hand, and bodily awareness on the other.
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  11.  47
    Non Sense-Specific Perception and the Distinction Between the Senses.Louise Richardson - 2014 - Res Philosophica 91 (2):215-239.
    How should interaction between the senses affect thought about them? I try to capture some ways in which non sense-specific perception might be thought to make it impossible or pointless or explanatorily idle to distinguish between senses. This task is complicated by there being more than one view of the nature of the senses, and more than one kind of non sense-specific perception. I argue, in particular, that provided we are willing to forgo certain assumptions about, for instance, the relationship (...)
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  12.  30
    Perception and its Modalities. [REVIEW]Louise Richardson - 2015 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2015.
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  13.  3
    Bodily Sensation and Tactile Perceptio.Louise Richardson - 2013 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 86 (1):134-154.
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  14.  2
    Littérature Et Société Arrageoises au XIIIe Siècle: Les Chansons Et Dits Artésiens. [REVIEW]Louise Richardson - 1983 - Speculum 58 (3):728-730.
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  15.  1
    Littérature et société arrageoises au XIIIe siècle: Les chansons et dits artésiens. Roger Berger.Louise Barbara Richardson - 1983 - Speculum 58 (3):728-730.
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  16.  5
    Carnap's Construction of the World (G. Kemp and A. Richardson).A. Richardson - 1999 - Philosophical Books 40 (3):89-101.
  17.  82
    Alan W. Richardson. 'The Tenacious, Malleable, Indefatigable, and yet, Eternally Modifiable Will': Hans Reichenbach's Knowing Subject.Alan W. Richardson & Thomas E. Uebel - 2005 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 79 (1):73–87.
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  18.  1
    Institutionally Divided Moral Responsibility*: HENRY S. RICHARDSON.Henry S. Richardson - 1999 - Social Philosophy and Policy 16 (2):218-249.
    I am going to be discussing a mode of moral responsibility that anglophone philosophers have largely neglected. It is a type of responsibility that looks to the future rather than the past. Because this forward-looking moral responsibility is relatively unfamiliar in the lexicon of analytic philosophy, many of my locutions will initially strike many readers as odd. As a matter of everyday speech, however, the notion of forward-looking moral responsibility is perfectly familiar. Today, for instance, I said I would be (...)
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  19.  15
    Katherine Richardson: An Oceanographer with a Global Outlook and a Pioneer in Sustainability Science Interview by Bernard Hubert and Niels Halberg.Katherine Richardson, Bernard Hubert & Niels Halberg - 2014 - Natures Sciences Sociétés 22 (4):359-365.
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  20.  32
    Retrospectivity and the Rule of Law / C. Sampford ; with the Assistance of J. Louise, S. Blencowe, and T. Round.C. Sampford, J. Louise, S. Blencowe & T. Round - unknown
    Retrospective rule-making has few supporters and many opponents. Defenders of retrospective laws generally do so on the basis that they are a necessary evil in specific or limited circumstances, for example to close tax loopholes, to deal with terrorists or to prosecute fallen tyrants. Yet the reality of retrospective rule making is far more widespread than this, and ranges from ’corrective’ legislation to ’interpretive regulations’ to judicial decision making. The search for a rational justification for retrospective rule-making necessitates a reconsideration (...)
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  21.  19
    Roman Religious Officials (J.) Rüpke Fasti Sacerdotum. A Prosopography of Pagan, Jewish, and Christian Religious Officials in the City of Rome, 300 BC to AD 499. Biographies of Christian Officials by Anne Glock. Translated by David M.B. Richardson. Pp. X + 1107. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008 (First Published 2005). Cased, £325. ISBN: 978-0-19-929113-. [REVIEW]J. H. Richardson - 2009 - The Classical Review 59 (2):550-.
  22.  2
    Discerning Subordination and Inviolability: A Comment on Kamm's Intricate Ethics: Henry S. Richardson.Henry S. Richardson - 2008 - Utilitas 20 (1):81-91.
    Frances Kamm has for some time now been a foremost champion of non-consequentialist ethics. One of her most powerful non-consequentialist themes has been the idea of inviolability. Morality's prohibitions, she argues, confer on persons the status of inviolability. This thought helps articulate a rationale for moral prohibitions that will resist the protean threat posed by the consequentialist argument that anyone should surely be willing to violate a constraint if doing so will minimize the overall number of such violations. As Kamm (...)
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  23. Four Neglected Essays by Immanuel Kant John Richardson's 1798-99 Translations, with a Sketch of [Kant's] Life and Writings ; with New Translations of Two Letters, and an Exhaustive Bibliography of English Translations of Kant. [REVIEW]Immanuel Kant, John Richardson & Stephen Palmquist - 1994
     
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  24. Logic. From the Germ. Of E. Kant, to Which is Annexed a Sketch of His Life and Writings by J. Richardson.Immanuel Kant & John Richardson - 1819
     
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  25. Metaphysical Works, Tr. With Sketch of His Life and Writings, by J. Richardson. Containing 1. Logic. 2. Prolegomena to Future Metaphysics. 3. Enquiry Into the Proofs for the Existence of God, and Into the Theodicy. [REVIEW]Immanuel Kant & John Richardson - 1836
     
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  26. Prolegomena to Every Future Metaphysic, Which Can Appear as a Science; From the Germ. By J. Richardson.Immanuel Kant & John Richardson - 1819
     
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  27. From Phenomenology to Thought, Errancy, and Desire Essays in Honor of William J. Richardson, S.J.William J. Richardson & Babette E. Babich - 1995
     
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  28.  7
    Evolutionary Psychology as Maladapted Psychology.Robert C. Richardson - 2007 - Bradford.
    Human beings, like other organisms, are the products of evolution. Like other organisms, we exhibit traits that are the product of natural selection. Our psychological capacities are evolved traits as much as are our gait and posture. This much few would dispute. Evolutionary psychology goes further than this, claiming that our psychological traits -- including a wide variety of traits, from mate preference and jealousy to language and reason -- can be understood as specific adaptations to ancestral Pleistocene conditions. In (...)
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  29.  49
    Carnap's Construction of the World: The Aufbau and the Emergence of Logical Empiricism.Alan W. Richardson - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a major contribution to the history of analytic philosophy in general and of logical positivism in particular. It provides the first detailed and comprehensive study of Rudolf Carnap, one of the most influential figures in twentieth-century philosophy. The focus of the book is Carnap's first major work: Der logische Aufbau der Welt. It reveals tensions within the context of German epistemology and philosophy of science in the early twentieth century. Alan Richardson argues that Carnap's move to (...)
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  30.  48
    Practical Reasoning About Final Ends.Henry S. Richardson - 1994 - Cambridge University Press.
    Henry Richardson argues that we can determine our ends rationally. He constructs a rich and original theory of how we can reason about our final goals. Richardson defuses the counter-arguments for the limits of rational deliberation, and develops interesting ideas about how his model might be extended to interpersonal deliberation of ends, taking him to the borders of political theory. Along the way Richardson offers illuminating discussions of, inter alia, Aristotle, Aquinas, Sidgwick, and Dewey, as well as (...)
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  31.  32
    Nietzsche's New Darwinism.John Richardson - 2004 - Oxford University Press.
    Nietzsche wrote in a scientific culture transformed by Darwin. He read extensively in German and British Darwinists, and his own works dealt often with such obvious Darwinian themes as struggle and evolution. Yet most of what Nietzsche said about Darwin was hostile: he sharply attacked many of his ideas, and often slurred Darwin himself as mediocre. So most readers of Nietzsche have inferred that he must have cast Darwin quite aside. But in fact, John Richardson argues, Nietzsche was deeply (...)
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  32. Autonomy and Multiple Realization.Robert C. Richardson - 2008 - Philosophy of Science 75 (5):526-536.
    Multiple realization historically mandated the autonomy of psychology, and its principled irreducibility to neuroscience. Recently, multiple realization and its implications for the reducibility of psychology to neuroscience have been challenged. One challenge concerns the proper understanding of reduction. Another concerns whether multiple realization is as pervasive as is alleged. I focus on the latter question. I illustrate multiple realization with actual, rather than hypothetical, cases of multiple realization from within the biological sciences. Though they do support a degree of autonomy (...)
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  33.  24
    Nietzsche's System.John Richardson - 1996 - Oxford University Press.
    This book argues, against recent interpretations, that Nietzsche does in fact have a metaphysical system--but that this is to his credit. Rather than renouncing philosophy's traditional project, he still aspires to find and state essential truths, both descriptive and valuative, about us and the world. These basic thoughts organize and inform everything he writes; by examining them closely we can find the larger structure and unifying sense of his strikingly diverse views. With rigor and conceptual specificity, Richardson examines the (...)
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  34. Nietzsche.John Richardson & Brian Leiter (eds.) - 2001 - Oxford University Press.
    The latest volume in the Oxford Readings in Philosophy series, this work brings together some of the best and most influential recent philosophical scholarship on Nietzsche. Opening with a substantial introduction by John Richardson, it covers: Nietzsche's views on truth and knowledge, his 'doctrines' of the eternal recurrence and will to power, his distinction between Apollinian and Dionysian art, his critique of morality, his conceptions of agency and self-creation, and his genealogical method. For each of these issues, the papers (...)
     
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  35.  69
    Heidegger: Through Phenomenology to Thought.William J. Richardson - 1963 - Fordham University Press.
    "This book, one of the most frequently cited works on Martin Heidegger in any language, belongs on any short list of classic studies of Continental philosophy. William J. Richardson explores the famous turn in Heidegger's thought after Being in Time and demonstrates how this transformation was radical without amounting to a simple contradiction of his earlier views." "In a full account of the evolution of Heidegger's work as a whole, Richardson provides a detailed, systematic, and illuminating account of (...)
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  36.  86
    A Theoria Round Table on Philosophy Publishing.Bengt Hansson, Hans van Ditmarsch, Pascal Engel, Sven Ove Hansson, Vincent Hendricks, Søren Holm, Pauline Jacobson, Anthonie Meijers, Henry S. Richardson & Hans Rott - 2011 - Theoria 77 (2):104-116.
    As part of the conference commemorating Theoria's 75th anniversary, a round table discussion on philosophy publishing was held in Bergendal, Sollentuna, Sweden, on 1 October 2010. Bengt Hansson was the chair, and the other participants were eight editors-in-chief of philosophy journals: Hans van Ditmarsch (Journal of Philosophical Logic), Pascal Engel (Dialectica), Sven Ove Hansson (Theoria), Vincent Hendricks (Synthese), Søren Holm (Journal of Medical Ethics), Pauline Jacobson (Linguistics and Philosophy), Anthonie Meijers (Philosophical Explorations), Henry S. Richardson (Ethics) and Hans Rott (...)
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  37.  16
    Experience and Prediction: An Analysis of the Foundations and the Structure of Knowledge.Alan W. Richardson & Hans Reichenbach - 1938 - University of Notre Dame Press.
    Hans Reichenbach was a formidable figure in early-twentieth-century philosophy of science. Educated in Germany, he was influential in establishing the so-called Berlin Circle, a companion group to the Vienna Circle founded by his colleague Rudolph Carnap. The movement they founded—usually known as "logical positivism," although it is more precisely known as "scientific philosophy" or "logical empiricism"—was a form of epistemology that privileged scientific over metaphysical truths. Reichenbach, like other young philosophers of the exact sciences of his generation, was deeply impressed (...)
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  38.  69
    Pierre Wagner (Ed.): Carnap's Logical Syntax of Language. Palgrave-MacMillan, 2009, 288pp, £57.00 HB. [REVIEW]Alan Richardson - 2011 - Metascience 20 (3):599-600.
    Pierre Wagner (ed.): Carnap’s logical syntax of language . Palgrave-MacMillan, 2009, 288pp, £57.00 HB Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-2 DOI 10.1007/s11016-011-9522-8 Authors Alan Richardson, Department of Philosophy, University of British Columbia, 1866 Main Mall—E370, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 Canada Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  39.  15
    Reviews. [REVIEW]Alan Richardson, Werner Sauer, Keith Lehrer, Johann Marek & Kevin Mulligan - 1999 - Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook 7:347-363.
    Richardson’s study on Carnap’s early philosophy culminating in Der logische Aufbau der Welt of 1928 ,presents a comprehensive and sustained effort at understanding it as deeply rooted in neo-Kantian patterns of thought: thus it belongs to a more recent tradition of viewing the emergence of Carnap’s thought, alternative to the older approach of interpreting it against the background of empiricist themes, and well deserves to be labelled the most thoroughgoing expression this more recent tradition has been given until now.
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  40.  27
    The Epistemic Agent in Logical Positivism.Alan W. Richardson & Thomas E. Uebel - 2005 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 79:73-105.
    [ Alan W. Richardson] This essay explores the uses that Michael Friedman and Bas van Fraassen have recently made of the work of Hans Reichenbach. It uses Friedman's work to complicate van Fraassen's invocation of Reichenbach's voluntarism in support of empiricism. It uses van Fraassen's work to motivate a concern with Friedman's neo-Kantian reading of Reichenbach. We are, finally, left with questions about the status and content of the account of the epistemic subject available to an epistemological voluntarist. /// (...)
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  41.  21
    Brute Rationality.J. Louise - unknown
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  42.  16
    Scoring Ancestral Graph Models.Thomas Richardson & Peter Spirtes - unknown
    Thomas Richardson and Peter Spirtes. Scoring Ancestral Graph Models.
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  43.  15
    Interrogating the Trope of the Door in Multicultural Education: Framing Diplomatic Relations to Indigenous Political and Legal Difference.Troy A. Richardson - 2011 - Educational Theory 61 (3):295-310.
    In this essay Troy Richardson works to develop a conceptual framework and set of terms by which a diplomatic reception of different forms of law can be developed in multicultural education. Taking up the trope of the door in multiculturalist discourse as a site in which a welcoming of the difference of others is organized, Richardson interrogates the complex nature of receptivity to Indigenous customary law, in particular. He argues that, within this trope, a metonymic structure operates in (...)
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  44.  16
    From Agency/Empowerment to Embodied Empowerment.Mary Sue Richardson - 1994 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 14 (1):79-82.
    Comments on the agency papers by B. D. Slife , M. Gergen , R. N. Williams , and G. S. Howard . In response to these papers, M. S. Richardson states that the construct of agency/empowerment is replaced with embodied empowerment, the idea of which needs to be developed in a moral concept. 2012 APA, all rights reserved).
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  45.  8
    Parameterizing and Scoring Mixed Ancestral Graphs.Thomas Richardson & Peter Spirtes - unknown
    Thomas Richardson and Peter Spirtes. Parameterizing and Scoring Mixed Ancestral Graphs.
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  46.  4
    Evolutionary Psychology as Maladapted Psychology.Robert C. Richardson - 2010 - Bradford.
    Human beings, like other organisms, are the products of evolution. Like other organisms, we exhibit traits that are the product of natural selection. Our psychological capacities are evolved traits as much as are our gait and posture. This much few would dispute. Evolutionary psychology goes further than this, claiming that our psychological traits -- including a wide variety of traits, from mate preference and jealousy to language and reason -- can be understood as specific adaptations to ancestral Pleistocene conditions. In (...)
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  47. Heidegger.John Richardson - 2012 - Routledge.
    Martin Heidegger is one of the twentieth century’s most influential, but also most cryptic and controversial philosophers. His early fusion of phenomenology with existentialism inspired Sartre and many others, and his later critique of modern rationality inspired Derrida and still others. This introduction covers the whole of Heidegger’s thought and is ideal for anyone coming to his work for the first time. John Richardson centres his account on Heidegger’s persistent effort to change the very kind of understanding or truth (...)
     
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  48. Moral Entanglements: The Ancillary-Care Obligations of Medical Researchers.Henry S. Richardson - 2012 - Oup Usa.
    The philosopher Henry Richardson's short book is a defense of a position on a neglected topic in medical research ethics. Clinical research ethics has been a longstanding area of study, dating back to the aftermath of the Nazi death-camp doctors and the Tuskegee syphilis study. Most ethical regulations and institutions have developed in response to those past abuses, including the stress on obtaining informed consent from the subject. Richardson points out that that these ethical regulations do not address (...)
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  49. Pragmatism and American Experience: An Introduction.Joan Richardson - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    Pragmatism and American Experience provides a lucid and elegant introduction to America's defining philosophy. Joan Richardson charts the nineteenth-century origins of pragmatist thought and its development through the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, focusing on the major first- and second-generation figures and how their contributions continue to influence philosophical discourse today. At the same time, Richardson casts pragmatism as the method it was designed to be: a way of making ideas clear, examining beliefs, and breaking old habits and reinforcing (...)
     
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  50. Practical Reasoning About Final Ends.Henry S. Richardson - 1997 - Cambridge University Press.
    Henry Richardson argues that we can determine our ends rationally. He constructs a rich and original theory of how we can reason about our final goals. Richardson defuses the counter-arguments for the limits of rational deliberation, and develops interesting ideas about how his model might be extended to interpersonal deliberation of ends, taking him to the borders of political theory. Along the way Richardson offers illuminating discussions of, inter alia, Aristotle, Aquinas, Sidgwick, and Dewey, as well as (...)
     
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