Results for 'Louise Richardson‐Self'

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  1. Woman‐Hating: On Misogyny, Sexism, and Hate Speech.Louise Richardson‐Self - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (2):256-272.
    Hate speech is one of the most important conceptual categories in anti‐oppression politics today; a great deal of energy and political will is devoted to identifying, characterizing, contesting, and penalizing hate speech. However, despite the increasing inclusion of gender identity as a socially salient trait, antipatriarchal politics has largely been absent within this body of scholarship. Figuring out how to properly situate patriarchy‐enforcing speech within the category of hate speech is therefore an important politico‐philosophical project. My aim in this article (...)
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  2. Offending White Men: Racial Vilification, Misrecognition, and Epistemic Injustice.Louise Richardson-Self - 2018 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 4 (4):1-24.
    In this article I analyse two complaints of white vilification, which are increasingly occurring in Australia. I argue that, though the complainants (and white people generally) are not harmed by such racialized speech, the complainants in fact harm Australians of colour through these utterances. These complaints can both cause and constitute at least two forms of epistemic injustice (willful hermeneutical ignorance and comparative credibility excess). Further, I argue that the complaints are grounded in a dual misrecognition: the complainants misrecognize themselves (...)
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  3.  38
    Justifying Same-Sex Marriage: A Philosophical Investigation.Louise Richardson-Self - 2015 - London: Rowman & Littlefield International.
    This book provides a philosophical examination of the extent to which legalizing same-sex marriage can contribute to ending the discrimination and social stigma faced by LGBT men and women in the Western world.
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  4.  41
    “Offensiphobia” is a Red Herring: On the Problem of Censorship and Academic Freedom.Ben Cross & Louise Richardson-Self - 2020 - The Journal of Ethics 24 (1):31-54.
    In a recent article, J. Angelo Corlett criticises what he takes to be the ‘offensiphobic’ practices characteristic of many universities. The ‘offensiphobe’, according to Corlett, believes that offensive speech ought to be censured precisely because it offends. We argue that there are three serious problems with Corlett’s discussion. First, his criticism of ‘offensiphobia’ misrepresents the kinds of censorship practiced by universities; many universities may in some way censure speech which they regard as offensive, but this is seldom if ever a (...)
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  5.  32
    Cis-Hetero-Misogyny Online.Louise Richardson-Self - 2019 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 22 (3):573-587.
    This article identifies five genres of anti-queer hate speech found in The Australian’s Facebook comments sections, exposing and analyzing the ways in which such comments are used to derogate cisgender and heterosexual women. One may be tempted to think of cis-het women as third-party victims of queerphobia; however, this article argues that these genres of anti-queer speech are, in fact, misogynistic. Specifically, it argues that these are instances of cis-hetero-misogynistic hate speech. Cis-hetero-misogyny functions as the “law enforcement branch” of a (...)
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  6.  16
    Questioning the Goal of Same-Sex Marriage.Louise Richardson-Self - 2012 - Australian Feminist Studies 72 (27):205-219.
    The prominent call to legalise same-sex marriage in Australia raises questions concerning whether its achievement will result in amplified societal acceptance of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people, and on what grounds this acceptance will take place. Same-sex marriage may not challenge heteronormative and patriarchal features typically associated with marriage, and may serve to reinforce a hierarchy that promotes traditional marriage as the ideal relationship structure. This may result in only assimilationist acceptance of LGBT people. However, the consequence of (...)
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  7. Symposium on Louise Richardson’s “Flavour, Taste and Smell”.Louise Richardson, Fiona Macpherson, Mohan Matthen & Matthew Nudds - 2013 - Mind and Language Symposia at the Brains Blog.
  8. Sniffing and Smelling.Louise Richardson - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 162 (2):401-419.
    In this paper I argue that olfactory experience, like visual experience, is exteroceptive: it seems to one that odours, when one smells them, are external to the body, as it seems to one that objects are external to the body when one sees them. Where the sense of smell has been discussed by philosophers, it has often been supposed to be non-exteroceptive. The strangeness of this philosophical orthodoxy makes it natural to ask what would lead to its widespread acceptance. I (...)
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  9. Seeing Empty Space.Louise Richardson - 2010 - European Journal of Philosophy 18 (2):227-243.
    Abstract: In this paper I offer an account of a particular variety of perception of absence, namely, visual perception of empty space. In so doing, I aim to make explicit the role that seeing empty space has, implicitly, in Mike Martin's account of the visual field. I suggest we should make sense of the claim that vision has a field—in Martin's sense—in terms of our being aware of its limitations or boundaries. I argue that the limits of the visual field (...)
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  10. Flavour, Taste and Smell.Louise Richardson - 2013 - Mind and Language 28 (3):322-341.
    I consider the role of psychology and other sciences in telling us about our senses, via the issue of whether empirical findings show us that flavours are perceived partly with the sense of smell. I argue that scientific findings do not establish that we're wrong to think that flavours are just tasted. Non-naturalism, according to which our everyday conception of the senses does not involve empirical commitments of a kind that could be corrected by empirical findings is, I suggest, a (...)
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  11. Space, Time and Molyneux's Question.Louise Richardson - 2014 - Ratio 27 (4):483-505.
    Whatever the answer to Molyneux's question is, it is certainly not obvious that the answer is ‘yes’. In contrast, it seems clear that we should answer affirmatively a temporal variation on Molyneux's question, introduced by Gareth Evans. I offer a phenomenological explanation of this asymmetry in our responses to the two questions. This explanation appeals to the modality-specific spatial structure of perceptual experience and its amodal temporal structure. On this explanation, there are differences in the perception of spatial properties in (...)
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  12.  32
    Odours as Olfactibilia.Louise Richardson - 2018 - In Thomas Crowther & Clare Mac Cumhaill (eds.), Perceptual Ephemera. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 93-114.
    It is natural to think that sight is distinctive amongst the senses in that we typically see ordinary objects directly, rather than seeing a visual equivalent to a sound or odour. It is also natural to think that sounds and odours (like rainbows and holograms) are sensibilia, in that they are each intimately related to just one of our senses. In this chapter, I defend these natural-seeming claims. I present a view on which odours are indeed sensibilia, a claim that (...)
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  13. Bodily Sensation and Tactile Perception.Louise Richardson - 2013 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 86 (1):134-154.
  14.  55
    IX—Perceptual Activity and Bodily Awareness.Louise Richardson - 2015 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 115 (2pt2):147-165.
    Bodily awareness is a kind of perceptual awareness of the body that we do not usually count as a sense. I argue that that there is an overlooked agential difference between bodily awareness and perception in the five familiar senses: a difference in what is involved in perceptual activity in sight, hearing, touch taste and smell on the one hand, and bodily awareness on the other.
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  15.  93
    Non Sense-Specific Perception and the Distinction Between the Senses.Louise Richardson - 2014 - Res Philosophica 91 (2):215-239.
    How should interaction between the senses affect thought about them? I try to capture some ways in which non sense-specific perception might be thought to make it impossible or pointless or explanatorily idle to distinguish between senses. This task is complicated by there being more than one view of the nature of the senses, and more than one kind of non sense-specific perception. I argue, in particular, that provided we are willing to forgo certain assumptions about, for instance, the relationship (...)
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  16. Improvisation and the Self-Organization of Multiple Musical Bodies.Ashley E. Walton, Michael J. Richardson, Peter Langland-Hassan & Anthony Chemero - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6:1-9.
  17.  56
    Complexity, Self-Organization and Selection.Robert C. Richardson - 2001 - Biology and Philosophy 16 (5):653-682.
    Recent work on self organization promises an explanation of complex order which is independent of adaptation. Self-organizing systems are complex systems of simple units, projecting order as a consequence of localized and generally nonlinear interactions between these units. Stuart Kauffman offers one variation on the theme of self-organization, offering what he calls a ``statistical mechanics'' for complex systems. This paper explores the explanatory strategies deployed in this ``statistical mechanics,'' initially focusing on the autonomy of statistical explanation as it applies in (...)
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  18. The Self Organization of Human Interaction.Rick Dale, Riccardo Fusaroli, Nicholas Duran & Daniel Richardson - 2013 - Psychology of Learning and Motivation 59.
    We describe a “centipede’s dilemma” that faces the sciences of human interaction. Research on human interaction has been involved in extensive theoretical debate, although the vast majority of research tends to focus on a small set of human behaviors, cognitive processes, and interactive contexts. The problem is that naturalistic human interaction must integrate all of these factors simultaneously, and grander theoretical mitigation cannot come only from focused experimental or computational agendas. We look to dynamical systems theory as a framework for (...)
     
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  19.  17
    Littérature et société arrageoises au XIIIe siècle: Les chansons et dits artésiens. Roger Berger.Louise Richardson - 1983 - Speculum 58 (3):728-730.
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  20.  42
    Perception and its Modalities. [REVIEW]Louise Richardson - 2015 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2015.
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  21. The Covid-19 Pandemic and the Bounds of Grief.Louise Richardson, Matthew Ratcliffe, Becky Millar & Eleanor Byrne - 2021 - Think 20 (57):89-101.
    ABSTRACTThis article addresses the question of whether certain experiences that originate in causes other than bereavement are properly termed ‘grief’. To do so, we focus on widespread experiences of grief that have been reported during the Covid-19 pandemic. We consider two potential objections to a more permissive use of the term: grief is, by definition, a response to a death; grief is subject to certain norms that apply only to the case of bereavement. Having shown that these objections are unconvincing, (...)
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  22. The Epistemological Power of Taste.Louise Richardson - forthcoming - Journal of the American Philosophical Association.
    It is generally accepted that sight—the capacity to see or to have visual experiences—has the power to give us knowledge about things in the environment and some of their properties in a distinctive way. Seeing the goose on the lake puts me in a position to know that it’s there and that it’s, say, brown, large, maybe even that it’s angry. And it does this by, when all goes well, presenting us with these features of the goose. One might even (...)
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  23.  70
    The Rationality of Perception, by Susanna Siegel. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017, Xxv + 221 Pp. ISBN 978‐0‐19‐879708‐1 Hb £35.00. [REVIEW]Louise Richardson - 2018 - European Journal of Philosophy 26 (3):1191-1194.
  24.  47
    The Senses: Classic and Contemporary Philosophical Perspectives. Edited by Fiona Macpherson. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2011. Pp. 448. Price £18.99.). [REVIEW]Louise Richardson - 2012 - Philosophical Quarterly 62 (248):651-653.
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  25. I Won’T Do It! Self-Prediction, Moral Obligation and Moral Deliberation.Jennie Louise - 2009 - Philosophical Studies 146 (3):327 - 348.
    This paper considers the question of whether predictions of wrongdoing are relevant to our moral obligations. After giving an analysis of ‘won’t’ claims (i.e., claims that an agent won’t Φ), the question is separated into two different issues: firstly, whether predictions of wrongdoing affect our objective moral obligations, and secondly, whether self-prediction of wrongdoing can be legitimately used in moral deliberation. I argue for an affirmative answer to both questions, although there are conditions that must be met for self-prediction to (...)
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  26.  12
    Self-Grounding Visual, Auditory and Olfactory Autobiographical Memories.Igor Knez, Louise Ljunglöf, Artin Arshamian & Johan Willander - 2017 - Consciousness and Cognition 52:1-8.
  27. Self-Motion: From Aristotle to Newton.Mary Louise Gill & James G. Lennox (eds.) - 1994 - Princeton University Press.
  28.  20
    I Won’T Do It! Self-Prediction, Moral Obligation and Moral Deliberation.Jennie Louise - 2009 - Philosophical Studies 146 (3):327-348.
    This paper considers the question of whether predictions of wrongdoing are relevant to our moral obligations. After giving an analysis of 'won't' claims, the question is separated into two different issues: firstly, whether predictions of wrongdoing affect our objective moral obligations, and secondly, whether self-prediction of wrongdoing can be legitimately used in moral deliberation. I argue for an affirmative answer to both questions, although there are conditions that must be met for self-prediction to be appropriate in deliberation. The discussion illuminates (...)
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  29. Nietzsche.John Richardson & Brian Leiter (eds.) - 2001 - Oxford University Press.
    The latest volume in the Oxford Readings in Philosophy series, this work brings together some of the best and most influential recent philosophical scholarship on Nietzsche. Opening with a substantial introduction by John Richardson, it covers: Nietzsche's views on truth and knowledge, his 'doctrines' of the eternal recurrence and will to power, his distinction between Apollinian and Dionysian art, his critique of morality, his conceptions of agency and self-creation, and his genealogical method. For each of these issues, the papers show (...)
     
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  30.  10
    Attention Control: Relationships Between Self-Report and Behavioural Measures, and Symptoms of Anxiety and Depression.Marie Louise Reinholdt-Dunne, Karin Mogg & Brendan P. Bradley - 2013 - Cognition and Emotion 27 (3):430-440.
  31.  5
    The Law and the Sublime: Rethinking the Self and its Boundaries.Janice Richardson - 2007 - Law and Critique 18 (2):229-252.
    Christine Battersby has argued that it is Kant who provides the paradigm model of what it is to be a self in modernity. The Kantian self is established in opposition to its other. The body is commonly envisaged as a container, with selfhood as something that is defended against the outside. In contrast, she proposes a feminist reworking of such a model of selfhood, applicable to both men and women, in which the self and other emerge over time through patterns (...)
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  32. A Philosophical Investigation of Rape: The Making and Unmaking of the Feminine Self.Louise du Toit - 2009 - Routledge.
    This book offers a critical feminist perspective on the widely debated topic of transitional justice and forgiveness. Louise Du Toit examines the phenomenon of rape with a feminist philosophical discourse concerning women’s or ‘feminine’ subjectivity and selfhood. She demonstrates how the hierarchical dichotomy of male active versus female passive sexuality – which obscures the true nature of rape – is embedded in the dominant western symbolic frame. Through a Hegelian and phenomenological reading of first-person accounts by rape victims, she (...)
     
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  33. But What Then Am I, This Inexhaustible, Unfathomable Historical Self? Or, Upon What Ground May One Commit Empiricism?Alan Richardson - 2011 - Synthese 178 (1):143 - 154.
    This essay examines the perspective from which Bas van Fraassen, in his book, The Empirical Stance, explains the project of empiricism. I argue that this perspective is a robustly transcendental perspective, which suggests that the tradition of empiricism lacks the resources to explain itself. I offer an alternative history of epistemic voluntarism in twentieth-century philosophy to the history van Fraassen himself provides, one that finds the novelty in van Fraassen's own views to be precisely his reintroduction of the knowing mind (...)
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  34. Purpose and Procedure in Philosophy of Perception.Heather Logue & Louise Richardson (eds.) - forthcoming - Oxford University Press.
    Contemporary philosophy of perception is dominated by extremely polarized debates. The polarization is particularly acute in the debate between naïve realist disjunctivists and their opponents, but divisions seem almost as stark in other areas of dispute (for example, the debate over whether we experience so-called ‘high-level’ properties, and the debate concerning individuation of the senses). The guiding hypothesis underlying this volume is that such polarization stems from insufficient attention to how we should go about settling these debates. In general, there (...)
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  35.  23
    Isolating Observer-Based Reference Directions in Human Spatial Memory: Head, Body, and the Self-to-Array Axis.David Waller, Yvonne Lippa & Adam Richardson - 2008 - Cognition 106 (1):157-183.
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  36.  4
    Louise Bourgeois’ Technologies of the Self.Katrina Mitcheson - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetics and Phenomenology 2 (1):31-49.
    ABSTRACTIn this article, I demonstrate how Louise Bourgeois used her artworks not only to better understand herself but also to cultivate a self capable of taking control of and reshaping the material of her past. Exploring her artworks in the context of Michel Foucault's understanding of technologies of the self, I both contribute to the appreciation of Bourgeois’ work and show how visual artworks can be used to understand, cultivate, and transform aspects of the self. Foucault's understanding of our (...)
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  37.  15
    Louise Du Toit: A Philosophical Investigation of Rape: The Making and Unmaking of the Feminine Self: Routledge, New York, 2009, 256 Pp, Price: £70 , ISBN: 9780415990295. [REVIEW]Yvette Russell - 2010 - Feminist Legal Studies 18 (1):101-104.
  38.  4
    Self-Motion: From Aristotle to Newton by Mary Louise Gill; James G. Lennox. [REVIEW]Christian Wildberg - 1995 - Isis 86:467-468.
  39.  6
    Self-Motion: From Aristotle to NewtonMary Louise Gill James G. Lennox.Christian Wildberg - 1995 - Isis 86 (3):467-468.
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  40.  52
    Self-Refutations and Much More: The Dialectical Thinking of Hilary Putnam.Louise Cummings - 2001 - Theoria 16 (2):237-268.
    In the following discussion, I examine what constitutes the dialectical strain in Putnam’s thought. As part of this examination, I consider Putnam’s criticism of the fact/value dichotomy. I compare this criticism to Putnam’s analysis of the metaphysical realist’s position, a position which has occupied Putnam’s thinking more than any other philosophical stance. I describe how Putnam pursues a chargeof self-refutation against the metaphysical realist and against the proponent of a fact/value dichotomy, a charge which assumes dialectical significance. So it is (...)
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  41.  26
    Louise du Toit, A Philosophical Investigation of Rape: The Making and Unmaking of the Feminine Self (Routledge: 2009). [REVIEW]Lindsay Kelland - 2012 - Philosophical Papers 41 (1):167-175.
    Philosophical Papers, Volume 41, Issue 1, Page 167-175, March 2012.
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  42.  17
    Beliefs as Self-Sustaining Networks: Drawing Parallels Between Networks of Ecosystems and Adults’ Predictions.Ramon D. Castillo, Heidi Kloos, Michael J. Richardson & Talia Waltzer - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  43.  91
    The Left Vienna Circle, Part 2. The Left Vienna Circle, Disciplinary History, and Feminist Philosophy of Science.Sarah S. Richardson - 2009 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 40 (2):167-174.
    This paper analyzes the claim that the Left Vienna Circle offers a theoretical and historical precedent for a politically engaged philosophy of science today. I describe the model for a political philosophy of science advanced by LVC historians. They offer this model as a moderate, properly philosophical approach to political philosophy of science that is rooted in the analytic tradition. This disciplinary-historical framing leads to weaknesses in LVC scholars’ conception of the history of the LVC and its contemporary relevance. In (...)
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  44. Verbal Expressions of Self and Emotions: A Taxonomy with Implications for Alexithymia and Related Disorders.Louise Sundararajan & Lenhart K. Schubert - 2005 - In Ralph and Natika Ellis and Newton (ed.), Consciousness and Emotion: Agency, Conscious Choice, and Selective Perception. John Benjamins. pp. 243--284.
     
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  45.  6
    Verbal Expressions of Self and Emotions A Taxonomy with Implications for Alexithymia And.Louise Sundararajan & Lenhart K. Schubert - 2005 - Consciousness and Emotion: Agency, Conscious Choice, and Selective Perception 1:243.
  46.  4
    Modern Tragedies in Self-Help Literature, Blogs and Online Universes: Conceptions of Resilience as a Literary Phenomenon.Louise Folker Christensen, Peter Simonsen & Anna Paldam Folker - 2020 - Medical Humanities 46 (4):474-482.
    Focusing on the configuration of the relationship between fate and freedom of action, this article analyses recent self-help literature and online communities, particularly the genre that centres on the concept of resilience. The selected works and websites all address readers who suffer from depression, anxiety and stress. The article focuses on how the relationship between fate and freedom is represented in three literary figures: the reader, who is promised recovery; the narrator, who promises to save the reader from the mental (...)
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  47.  35
    Archiving the Self? Facebook as Biography of Social and Relational Memory.Kathleen Richardson & Sue Hessey - 2009 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 7 (1):25-38.
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  48.  11
    Isolating Observer-Based Reference Directions in Human Spatial Memory: Head, Body, and the Self-to-Array Axis.Adam Richardson David Waller, Yvonne Lippa - 2008 - Cognition 106 (1):157.
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  49.  61
    Happiness Donut: A Confucian Critique of Positive Psychology.Louise Sundararajan - 2005 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 25 (1):35-60.
    An empirically based version of the good life as proposed by positive psychology is a donut with something missing at the core--the moral map. This paper addresses ramifications of this lacuna, and suggests ways to narrow the gap between science and life. By applying an extended version of the self-regulation theory of Higgins to a cross cultural analysis of the good life as envisioned by Seligman and Confucius, respectively, this paper sheds light on the culturally encapsulated value judgments behind positive (...)
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  50.  43
    Religious Awe: Potential Contributions of Negative Theology to Psychology, "Positive" or Otherwise.Louise Sundararajan - 2002 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 22 (2):174-197.
    A hallmark of Christian mysticism is negative theology, which refers to the school of thought that gives prominence to negation in reference to God. By denying the possibility to name God, negative theology cuts at the very root of our cognitive makeup--the human impulse to name and put things into categories--and thereby situates us "halfway between a 'no longer' and a 'not yet'" , a temporality in which "the past is negated, but...the present is not yet formulated" . The affective (...)
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