Order:
  1.  69
    The Moral Difference or Equivalence Between Continuous Sedation Until Death and Physician-Assisted Death: Word Games or War Games?: A Qualitative Content Analysis of Opinion Pieces in the Indexed Medical and Nursing Literature. [REVIEW]Sam Rys, Reginald Deschepper, Freddy Mortier, Luc Deliens, Douglas Atkinson & Johan Bilsen - 2012 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (2):171-183.
    Continuous sedation until death (CSD), the act of reducing or removing the consciousness of an incurably ill patient until death, often provokes medical–ethical discussions in the opinion sections of medical and nursing journals. Some argue that CSD is morally equivalent to physician-assisted death (PAD), that it is a form of “slow euthanasia.” A qualitative thematic content analysis of opinion pieces was conducted to describe and classify arguments that support or reject a moral difference between CSD and PAD. Arguments pro and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  2.  50
    Continuous Sedation Until Death: Moral Justifications of Physicians and Nurses—a Content Analysis of Opinion Pieces. [REVIEW]Sam Rys, Freddy Mortier, Luc Deliens, Reginald Deschepper, Margaret Pabst Battin & Johan Bilsen - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (3):533-542.
    Continuous sedation until death (CSD), the act of reducing or removing the consciousness of an incurably ill patient until death, often provokes medical-ethical discussions in the opinion sections of medical and nursing journals. A content analysis of opinion pieces in medical and nursing literature was conducted to examine how clinicians define and describe CSD, and how they justify this practice morally. Most publications were written by physicians and published in palliative or general medicine journals. Terminal Sedation and Palliative Sedation are (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  3.  22
    Labelling of End-of-Life Decisions by Physicians.Jef Deyaert, Kenneth Chambaere, Joachim Cohen, Marc Roelands & Luc Deliens - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (7):505-507.
    Objectives Potentially life-shortening medical end-of-life practices ) remain subject to conceptual vagueness. This study evaluates how physicians label these practices by examining which of their own practices they label as euthanasia or sedation.Methods We conducted a large stratified random sample of death certificates from 2007 . The physicians named on the death certificate were approached by means of a postal questionnaire asking about ELDs made in each case and asked to choose the most appropriate label to describe the ELD. Response (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  4.  21
    Factors That Facilitate or Constrain the Use of Continuous Sedation at the End of Life by Physicians and Nurses in Belgium: Results From a Focus Group Study.Kasper Raus, Livia Anquinet, Judith Rietjens, Luc Deliens, Freddy Mortier & Sigrid Sterckx - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (4):230-234.
    Continuous sedation at the end of life is the practice whereby a physician uses sedatives to reduce or take away a patient's consciousness until death. Although the incidence of CS is rising, as of yet little research has been conducted on how the administration of CS is experienced by medical practitioners. Existing research shows that many differences exist between medical practitioners regarding how and how often they perform CS. We conducted a focus group study to find out which factors may (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  5.  36
    End-of-Life Decisions of Physicians in the City of Hasselt (Flanders, Belgium).Freddy Mortier, Luc Deliens, Johan Bilsen, Marc Cosyns, Koen Ingels & Robert Vander Stichele - 2000 - Bioethics 14 (3):254–267.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  6.  20
    Forgoing Artificial Nutrition or Hydration at the End of Life: A Large Cross-Sectional Survey in Belgium.Kenneth Chambaere, Ilse Loodts, Luc Deliens & Joachim Cohen - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (7):501-504.
    Objectives To examine the frequency and characteristics of decisions to forgo artificial nutrition and/or hydration at the end of life.Design Postal questionnaire survey regarding end-of-life decisions to physicians certifying a large representative sample of Belgian death certificates in 2007.Setting Flanders, Belgium, 2007.Participants Treating physicians of deceased patients.Results Response rate was 58.4%. A decision to forgo ANH occurred in 6.6% of all deaths . Being female, dying in a care home or hospital and suffering from nervous system diseases or malignancies were (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  7.  32
    End‐of‐Life Decisions of Physicians in the City of Hasselt (Flanders, Belgium).Freddy Mortier, Luc Deliens, Johan Bilsen, Marc Cosyns, Koen Ingels & Robert Vander Stichele - 2000 - Bioethics 14 (3):254-267.
  8.  2
    Differences in Advance Care Planning Among Nursing Home Care Staff.Joni Gilissen, Annelien Wendrich-van Dael, Chris Gastmans, Robert Vander Stichele, Luc Deliens, Karen Detering, Lieve Van den Block & Lara Pivodic - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics:096973302199418.
    Background A team-based approach has been advocated for advance care planning in nursing homes. While nurses are often put forward to take the lead, it is not clear to what extent other professions could be involved as well. Objectives To examine to what extent engagement in advance care planning practices, knowledge and self-efficacy differ between nurses, care assistants and allied care staff in nursing homes. Design Survey study. Participants/setting The study involved a purposive sample of 14 nursing homes in Flanders, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark