7 found
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  1.  22
    Rethinking Medical Humanities.Luca Chiapperino & Giovanni Boniolo - 2014 - Journal of Medical Humanities 35 (4):377-387.
    This paper questions different conceptions of Medical Humanities in order to provide a clearer understanding of what they are and why they matter. Building upon former attempts, we defend a conception of Medical Humanities as a humanistic problem-based approach to medicine aiming at influencing its nature and practice. In particular, we discuss three main conceptual issues regarding the overall nature of this discipline: a problem-driven approach to Medical Humanities; the need for an integration of Medical Humanities into medicine; the methodological (...)
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  2.  10
    The European Politics of Animal Experimentation: From Victorian Britain to ‘Stop Vivisection’.Pierre-Luc Germain, Luca Chiapperino & Giuseppe Testa - 2017 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 64:75-87.
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  3.  23
    Challenging the Idea of Corporate Responsibility: Physician's Obligation to Disclose Information.Luca Chiapperino & Janaina Oliva Oishi - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (9):20-21.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 9, Page 20-21, September 2011.
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  4.  2
    On the Traces of the Biosocial: Historicizing “Plasticity” in Contemporary Epigenetics.Luca Chiapperino & Francesco Panese - 2021 - History of Science 59 (1):3-44.
    This paper builds upon historico-epistemological analyses of plasticity across the nineteenth and twentieth centuries to distinguish among uses of this notion in contemporary epigenetics. By digging into this diachronic phase of plasticity thinking, we highlight a series of historically situated understandings and pragmatic dimensions of this notion. Specifically, our analysis describes four distinct phases in plasticity thinking across the nineteenth and twentieth centuries: plasticity as chemical modification of the body by its milieu; plasticity as explanandum for the modifications of life’s (...)
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  5.  9
    What Autonomy for Telecare? An Externalist Approach.Luca Chiapperino, Marco Annoni, Paolo Maugeri & Giuseppe Schiavone - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (9):55-57.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 9, Page 55-57, September 2012.
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  6.  9
    What Kind of Principle Is Clinical Equipoise?Luca Chiapperino & Cecilia Nardini - 2014 - Theoretical and Applied Ethics 3 (1):1-16.
    Equipoise, or the criterion of honest professional uncertainty in the clinical community, is currently the most widely accepted standard for adjudicating the ethical dilemmas of medical research involving human patients. Nonetheless, equipoise has recently become a subject of considerable criticism. Among the objections to equipoise, an important one is based on the observation of an objective difficulty for equipoise in providing sound ethical guidance in practical circumstances that arise in clinical research. A chief example of such problem is represented by (...)
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  7.  11
    Continued Confinement of Those Most Vulnerable to COVID-19.Samia Hurst, Eva Maria Belser, Claudine Burton-Jeangros, Pascal Mahon, Cornelia Hummel, Settimio Monteverde, Tanja Krones, Stéphanie Dagron, Cécile Bensimon, Bianca Schaffert, Alexander Trechsel, Luca Chiapperino, Laure Kloetzer, Tania Zittoun, Ralf Jox, Marion Fischer, Anne Dalle Ave, Peter G. Kirchschlaeger & Suerie Moon - 2020 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 30 (3):401-418.
    Continued confinement of those most vulnerable to COVID-19—e.g., the elderly, those with chronic diseases and other risk factors—is presented as an uncontroversial measure when planning exit strategies from lockdown measures. Policies for deconfinement assume that these persons will remain confined even when others will not. This, however, could last quite a long time, and for some this could mean that they will remain in confinement for the rest of their lives.In a policy brief on ethical, legal, and social issues of (...)
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