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Lyn Horn [5]Lynette Margaret Horn [1]Lyn Margaret Horn [1]Lynette Horn [1]
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Lyn Horn
University of Stellenbosch
  1.  9
    Promoting Responsible Research Conduct in a Developing World Academic Context.Lyn Margaret Horn - 2013 - South African Journal of Bioethics and Law 6 (1):19.
    CITATION: Horn, L. M. 2015. Promoting responsible research conduct in a developing world academic context. South African Journal of Bioethics and Law, 6:21-24, doi:10.7196/SAJBL.256.
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  2.  18
    Research Vulnerability: An Illustrative Case Study From the South African Mining Industry.Lyn Horn - 2007 - Developing World Bioethics 7 (3):119–127.
    ABSTRACTThe concept of ‘vulnerability’ is well established within the realm of research ethics and most ethical guidelines include a section on ‘vulnerable populations’. However, the term ‘vulnerability’, used within a human research context, has received a lot of negative publicity recently and has been described as being simultaneously ‘too broad’ and ‘too narrow’.1 The aim of the paper is to explore the concept of research vulnerability by using a detailed case study – that of mineworkers in post‐apartheid South Africa. In (...)
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  3. Cooperation & Liaison Between Universities & Editors (CLUE): Recommendations on Best Practice.Gerrit van Meer, Paul Taylor, Bernd Pulverer, Debra Parrish, Susan King, Lyn Horn, Zoë Hammatt, Chris Graf, Michele Garfinkel, Michael Farthing, Ksenija Bazdaric, Volker Bähr, Sabine Kleinert & Elizabeth Wager - 2021 - Research Integrity and Peer Review 6 (1).
    BackgroundInaccurate, false or incomplete research publications may mislead readers including researchers and decision-makers. It is therefore important that such problems are identified and rectified promptly. This usually involves collaboration between the research institutions and academic journals involved, but these interactions can be problematic.MethodsThese recommendations were developed following discussions at World Conferences on Research Integrity in 2013 and 2017, and at a specially convened 3-day workshop in 2016 involving participants from 7 countries with expertise in publication ethics and research integrity. The (...)
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  4.  2
    The Cambridge Handbook of Health Research Regulation Graeme Laurie, Edward Dove, Agomoni Ganguli‐Mitra, Catriona Mamillan, Emily Postan, Nayha Sethi, and Annie Sorbie (Eds.) Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2021. DOI 10.1017/9781108620024. Open Access. ISBN 978‐108‐47597‐6 Hard Copy. 421 Pp. $195. [REVIEW]Lyn Horn - 2022 - Bioethics 36 (5):605-607.
    Bioethics, Volume 36, Issue 5, Page 605-607, June 2022.
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  5.  25
    Promoting Responsible Research Conduct: A South African Perspective.Lyn Horn - 2017 - Journal of Academic Ethics 15 (1):59-72.
    A great deal of effort has gone into developing capacity in the sphere of human research protection programmes in South Africa and Africa over the last decade or more, by several international organisations. However the promotion of the broader agenda of research integrity or ‘RCR’ has lagged behind. From a global perspective South Africa and other African countries are actively involved in research endeavours and collaborations across a very broad spectrum of scientific fields. For this research to fulfil its potential (...)
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    Research Vulnerability: An Illustrative Case Study From the South African Mining Industry.Lyn Horn - 2007 - Developing World Bioethics 7 (3):119-127.
    ABSTRACTThe concept of ‘vulnerability’ is well established within the realm of research ethics and most ethical guidelines include a section on ‘vulnerable populations’. However, the term ‘vulnerability’, used within a human research context, has received a lot of negative publicity recently and has been described as being simultaneously ‘too broad’ and ‘too narrow’.1 The aim of the paper is to explore the concept of research vulnerability by using a detailed case study – that of mineworkers in post‐apartheid South Africa. In (...)
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