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Lynda Birke [27]Lynda I. A. Birke [4]
  1.  60
    Feminism, animals, and science: the naming of the shrew.Lynda I. A. Birke - 1994 - Philadelphia: Open University Press.
    The book then addresses the human/animal opposition implicit in much feminist theorizing, arguing that the opposition helps to maintain the essentialism that feminists have so often criticized. The final chapter brings us back from ideas of what 'the animal' is, to ask how these questions might relate to environmental politics, including ecofeminism and animal rights.
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  2.  28
    Feminism and the biological body.Lynda I. A. Birke - 2000 - New Brunswich, NJ: Rutgers University Press.
    Birke, a feminist biologist who has written extensively on the connections between feminism and science, seeks to bridge the gap between feminist cultural analysis and science by looking "inside" the body, using ideas in anatomy and physiology to develop the feminist view that the biological body is socially and culturally constructed. She rejects the assumption that the body's functioning is fixed and unchanging, claiming that biological science offers more than just a deterministic narrative of how nature works. Annotation copyrighted by (...)
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  3.  31
    Animal Performances: An Exploration of Intersections between Feminist Science Studies and Studies of Human/animal Relationships.Nina Lykke, Mette Bryld & Lynda Birke - 2004 - Feminist Theory 5 (2):167-183.
    Feminist science studies have given scant regard to non-human animals. In this paper, we argue that it is important for feminist theory to address the complex relationships between humans and other animals, and the implications of these for feminism. We use the notion of performativity, particularly as it has been developed by Karen Barad, to explore the intersections of feminism and studies of the human/animal relationship. Performativity, we argue, helps to challenge the persistent dichotomy between human/culture and animals/nature. It emphasizes, (...)
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  4. Talking about Horses: Control and Freedom in the World of "Natural Horsemanship".Lynda Birke - 2008 - Society and Animals 16 (2):107-126.
    This paper explores how horses are represented in the discourses of "natural horsemanship" , an approach to training and handling horses that advocates see as better than traditional methods. In speaking about their horses, NH enthusiasts move between two registers: On one hand, they use a quasi-scientific narrative, relying on terms and ideas drawn from ethology, to explain the instinctive behavior of horses. Within this mode of narrative, the horse is "other" and must be understood through the human learning to (...)
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  5.  56
    Intimate Familiarities? Feminism and Human-Animal Studies.Lynda Birke - 2002 - Society and Animals 10 (4):429-436.
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  6.  60
    Learning to Speak Horse": The Culture of "Natural Horsemanship.Lynda Birke - 2007 - Society and Animals 15 (3):217-239.
    This paper examines the rise of what is popularly called "natural horsemanship" , as a definitive cultural change within the horse industry. Practitioners are often evangelical about their methods, portraying NH as a radical departure from traditional methods. In doing so, they create a clear demarcation from the practices and beliefs of the conventional horse-world. Only NH, advocates argue, properly understands the horse. Dissenters, however, contest the benefits to horses as well as the reliance in NH on disputed concepts of (...)
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  7.  77
    Who—or What—are the Rats (and Mice) in the Laboratory.Lynda Birke - 2003 - Society and Animals 11 (3):207-224.
    This paper explores the many meanings attached to the designation,"the rodent in the laboratory". Generations of selective breeding have created these rodents. They now differ markedly from their wild progenitors, nonhuman animals associated with carrying all kinds of diseases.Through selective breeding, they have moved from the rats of the sewers to become standardized laboratory tools and saviors of humans in the fight against disease. This paper sketches two intertwined strands of metaphors associated with laboratory rodents.The first focuses on the idea (...)
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  8.  26
    Biology is a feminist issue: Interview with Lynda Birke.Lynda Birke & Cecilia Åsberg - 2010 - European Journal of Women's Studies 17 (4):413-423.
    This is an interview with Professor Lynda Birke, one of the key figures of feminist science studies. She is a pioneer of feminist biology and of materialist feminist thought, as well as of the new and emerging field of hum-animal studies. This interview was conducted over email in two time periods, in the spring of 2008 and 2010. The format allowed for comments on previous writings and an engagement in an open-ended dialogue. Professor Birke talks about her key arguments and (...)
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  9.  10
    Animal Bodies in the Production of Scientific Knowledge: Modelling Medicine.Lynda Birke - 2012 - Body and Society 18 (3-4):156-178.
    What role do nonhuman animals play in the construction of medical knowledge? Animal researchers typically claim that their use has been essential to progress – but just how have animals fitted into the development of biomedicine? In this article, I trace how nonhuman animals, and their body parts, have become incorporated into laboratory processes and places. They have long been designed to fit into scientific procedures – now increasingly so through genetic design. Animals and procedures are closely connected – animals (...)
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  10.  18
    Accounting for Animal Experiments: Identity and Disreputable "Others".Lynda Birke & Mike Michael - 1994 - Science, Technology and Human Values 19 (2):189-204.
    This article considers how scientists involved in animal experimentation attempt to defend their practices. Interviews with over 40 scientists revealed that, over and above direct criticisms of the antivivisection lobby, scientists used a number of discursive strategies to demonstrate that critics of animal experimentation are ethically and epistemologically infenor to British scientific practitioners. The scientists portrayed a series of negative "others" such as foreign scientists, farmers, and pet owners. In this manner, they attempted to create a "socioethical domain" which rhetorically (...)
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  11.  30
    Brill Online Books and Journals.Lynda Birke - 2003 - Society and Animals 11 (3):207-224.
    This paper explores the many meanings attached to the designation,"the rodent in the laboratory". Generations of selective breeding have created these rodents. They now differ markedly from their wild progenitors, nonhuman animals associated with carrying all kinds of diseases.Through selective breeding, they have moved from the rats of the sewers to become standardized laboratory tools and saviors of humans in the fight against disease. This paper sketches two intertwined strands of metaphors associated with laboratory rodents.The first focuses on the idea (...)
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  12.  14
    Who—or what—is the laboratory rat (and mouse).Lynda Birke - 2003 - Society and Animals 11 (3):207-224.
    This paper explores the many meanings attached to the designation,"the rodent in the laboratory". Generations of selective breeding have created these rodents. They now differ markedly from their wild progenitors, nonhuman animals associated with carrying all kinds of diseases.Through selective breeding, they have moved from the rats of the sewers to become standardized laboratory tools and saviors of humans in the fight against disease. This paper sketches two intertwined strands of metaphors associated with laboratory rodents.The first focuses on the idea (...)
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  13. Cleaving the mind : speculations on conceptual dichotomies.Lynda Birke - 1982 - In Steven Peter Russell Rose & Dialectics of Biology Group (eds.), Against biological determinism. New York, N.Y.: Distributed in the USA by Schocken Books.
     
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  14.  22
    Mutual Rescue: Disabled Animals and Their Caretakers.Lynda Birke & Lori Gruen - 2022 - Animal Studies Journal 11 (1):37-62.
    In this paper, we explore how caretakers experience living with disabled companion animals. Drawing on interviews, as well as narratives on websites and other support groups, we examine ways in which caretakers describe the lives of animals they live with, and their various disabilties. The animals were mostly dogs, plus a few cats, with a range of physical disabilities; almost all had been rehomed, often from places specializing in homing disabled animals. Three themes emerged from analysis of these texts: first, (...)
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  15.  5
    Biological sciences.Lynda Birke - 1998 - In Alison M. Jaggar & Iris Marion Young (eds.), A companion to feminist philosophy. Malden, Mass.: Blackwell. pp. 194–203.
    Our bodies are ourselves: yet we are also more than our bodies. In the early years of “second‐wave” feminism in the West, embodiment was acknowledged implicitly in the action of women's health groups, and campaigns for reproductive rights. But simultaneously, bodies failed to enter our theorizing. Central to theorizing then was a distinction between “sex,” (which anatomically distinguishes males and females) from “gender” (the processes of becoming “woman” or “man”). Although recent feminist writing tends to decry that simple opposition, the (...)
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  16. Interventions in hostile territory.Lynda Birke - 1994 - In Gabriele Griffin (ed.), Stirring it: challenges for feminism. Bristol, PA.: Taylor & Francis. pp. 185--94.
     
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  17.  16
    Introduction to "Animal Issues".Lynda Birke - 2002 - Society and Animals 10 (2):193-194.
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  18.  8
    New Section of S&A: Conceptual Animal Issues.Lynda Birke - 2002 - Society and Animals 10 (1):3-4.
  19.  11
    Review Essay.Lynda Birke - 1993 - Society and Animals 1 (2):191-206.
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  20. Who-orwhat-arethe rats (and mice) in the laboratory?Lynda Birke - 2003 - In Susan Jean Armstrong & Richard George Botzler (eds.), The animal ethics reader. New York: Routledge. pp. 326.
     
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  21. RSPCA. Jonathan Balcombe has been Associate Director for Education in the Animal Research Issues section of the Humane Society of the United States since 1993. He has degrees from York University and Carleton University, Toronto, and a doctoral degree in ethology from the University of Tennessee. [REVIEW]Marc Bekoffis, Bob Bermond, Lynda Birke, Bernice Bovenkerk, Baruch A. Brody & Jeffrey Burkhardt - 2003 - In Susan Jean Armstrong & Richard George Botzler (eds.), The animal ethics reader. New York: Routledge.
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  22.  5
    Book Review: Biological Politics: Feminist and Anti-feminist Perspectives. [REVIEW]Lynda Birke - 1983 - Feminist Review 13 (1):95-97.
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  23.  48
    Meddling with Medusa: on genetic manipulation, art and animals. [REVIEW]Lynda Birke - 2006 - AI and Society 20 (1):103-117.
    Turning animals into art through genetic manipulation poses many questions for how we think about our relationship with other species. Here, I explore three rather disparate sets of issues. First, I ask to what extent the production of such living “artforms” really is as transgressive as advocates claim. Whether or not it counts as radical in terms of art I cannot say: but it is not at all radical, I argue, in terms of how we think about our human place (...)
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  24.  5
    Book Review: Biological Politics: Feminist and Anti-feminist Perspectives. [REVIEW]Lynda Birke - 1983 - Feminist Review 13 (1):95-97.
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