Results for 'Lynda Clarke'

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Lynda Clarke
Concordia University
  1.  11
    Who has a Vasectomy Reversal?Lynda Clarke & Sue Gregson - 1986 - Journal of Biosocial Science 18 (3):253-259.
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  2.  2
    ‘Aql in Modern Shiite Thought: The Example of Muḥammad Jawād Maghniyya.Lynda Clarke - 2016 - In William Granara, Roy P. Mottahedeh, Wheeler M. Thackston & Alireza Korangy (eds.), Essays in Islamic Philology, History, and Philosophy. De Gruyter. pp. 281-311.
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  3. Thinking About the Environment: Our Debt to the Classical and Medieval Past.Alan Holland, Madonna R. Adams, Giovanni Casertano, Lynda G. Clarke, Edward Halper, Michael W. Herren, Helen Karabatzaki, Emile F. Kutash, Teresa Kwiatkowska, Parviz Morewedge, Rosmarie Thee Morewedge, Lorina Quartarone, Livio Rossetti, Daryl M. Tress, Valentina Vincenti & Hideya Yamakawa - 2002 - Lexington Books.
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  4.  2
    Biology is a Feminist Issue: Interview with Lynda Birke.Lynda Birke & Cecilia Åsberg - 2010 - European Journal of Women's Studies 17 (4):413-423.
    This is an interview with Professor Lynda Birke, one of the key figures of feminist science studies. She is a pioneer of feminist biology and of materialist feminist thought, as well as of the new and emerging field of hum-animal studies. This interview was conducted over email in two time periods, in the spring of 2008 and 2010. The format allowed for comments on previous writings and an engagement in an open-ended dialogue. Professor Birke talks about her key arguments (...)
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  5. The Correspondence of Samuel Clarke and Anthony Collins, 1707-08.Samuel Clarke & Anthony Collins - 2011 - Broadview Press.
    An important work in the debate between materialists and dualists, the public correspondence between Anthony Collins and Samuel Clarke provided the framework for arguments over consciousness and personal identity in eighteenth-century Britain. In Clarke's view, mind and consciousness are so unified that they cannot be compounded into wholes or divided into parts, so mind and consciousness must be distinct from matter. Collins, by contrast, was a perceptive advocate of a materialist account of mind, who defended the possibility that (...)
     
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  6.  43
    The Leibniz-Clarke Correspondence: Together with Extracts From Newton's Principia and Opticks.Samuel Clarke - 1956 - Barnes & Noble.
    This book presents extracts from Leibniz's letters to Newtonian scientist Samuel Clarke.
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  7. The Leibniz-Clarke Correspondence.Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz & Samuel Clarke - 1956 - In Elizabeth Schmidt Radcliffe, Richard McCarty, Fritz Allhoff & Anand Vaidya (eds.), Late Modern Philosophy: Essential Readings with Commentary. Blackwell.
  8. A Collection of Papers, Which Passed Between the Late Learned Mr. Leibnitz and Dr. Clarke in the Years 1715 and 1716 Relating to the Principles of Natural Philosophy and Religion : With an Appendix : To Which Are Added, Letters to Dr. Clarke Concerning Liberty and Necessity, From a Gentleman of the University of Cambridge, with the Doctor's Answers to Them : Also, Remarks Upon a Book, Entituled, a Philosophical Enquiry Concerning Human Liberty. [REVIEW]Samuel Clarke & Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz - 1717 - Printed for James Knapton.
  9. Leibniz and Clarke: Correspondence.Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, Samuel Clarke & Roger Ariew - 2000 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    For this new edition, Roger Ariew has adapted Samuel Clarke's edition of 1717, modernizing it to reflect contemporary English usage. Ariew's introduction places the correspondence in historical context and discusses the vibrant philosophical climate of the times. Appendices provide those selections from the works of Newton that Clarke frequently refers to in the correspondence. A bibliography is also included.
     
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  10. Feminism, Animals, and Science: The Naming of the Shrew.Lynda I. A. Birke - 1994 - Open University Press.
  11. Feminism and the Biological Body.Lynda I. A. Birke - 2000 - Rutgers University Press.
  12. Talking About Horses: Control and Freedom in the World of "Natural Horsemanship".Lynda Birke - 2008 - Society and Animals 16 (2):107-126.
    This paper explores how horses are represented in the discourses of "natural horsemanship" , an approach to training and handling horses that advocates see as better than traditional methods. In speaking about their horses, NH enthusiasts move between two registers: On one hand, they use a quasi-scientific narrative, relying on terms and ideas drawn from ethology, to explain the instinctive behavior of horses. Within this mode of narrative, the horse is "other" and must be understood through the human learning to (...)
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  13.  43
    Keston Clarke.Dudley Montague Clarke - 1984 - The Chesterton Review 10 (1):109-110.
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  14.  38
    Learning to Speak Horse": The Culture of "Natural Horsemanship.Lynda Birke - 2007 - Society and Animals 15 (3):217-239.
    This paper examines the rise of what is popularly called "natural horsemanship" , as a definitive cultural change within the horse industry. Practitioners are often evangelical about their methods, portraying NH as a radical departure from traditional methods. In doing so, they create a clear demarcation from the practices and beliefs of the conventional horse-world. Only NH, advocates argue, properly understands the horse. Dissenters, however, contest the benefits to horses as well as the reliance in NH on disputed concepts of (...)
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  15.  32
    Intimate Familiarities? Feminism and Human-Animal Studies.Lynda Birke - 2002 - Society and Animals 10 (4):429-436.
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  16.  15
    Controversies in Science.Lynda Dunlop & Fernanda Veneu - 2019 - Science & Education 28 (6-7):689-710.
    Controversies in science are an essential feature of scientific practice: defined here as current problems that are unresolved because there are no accepted procedures by which they can be resolved or there are differing assumptions that affect the interpretation of evidence. Although there has been much attention in science education literature addressing socio-scientific and historical controversies in science, less has been paid to the teaching of contemporary scientific controversies. Using semi-structured qualitative interviews with 18 teachers at different career stages in (...)
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  17.  61
    The Horse’s Tale: Narratives of Caring for/About Horses.Lynda Birke, Joanna Hockenhull & Emma Creighton - 2010 - Society and Animals 18 (4):331-347.
    In this paper, we report on a study of people who keep horses for leisure riding; the study was based on a qualitative analysis of written comments made by people keeping horses, focusing on how they care for them and how they describe horse behavior. These commentaries followed participation in an online survey investigating management practices. The responses clustered around two significant themes: the first centered around people’s methods of caring for their animal and the dependence of such care upon (...)
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  18. Morality and Mathematics.Justin Clarke-Doane - 2020 - Oxford University Press.
    To what extent are the subjects of our thoughts and talk real? This is the question of realism. In this book, Justin Clarke-Doane explores arguments for and against moral realism and mathematical realism, how they interact, and what they can tell us about areas of philosophical interest more generally. He argues that, contrary to widespread belief, our mathematical beliefs have no better claim to being self-evident or provable than our moral beliefs. Nor do our mathematical beliefs have better claim (...)
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  19.  55
    Descartes’s Conception of Mind Through the Prism of Imagination: Cartesian Substance Dualism Questioned.Lynda Gaudemard - 2018 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie:146-171.
    The aim of this article is to clarify an aspect of Descartes’s conception of mind that seriously impacts on the standard objections against Cartesian dualism. By a close reading of Descartes’s writings on imagination, I argue that the capacity to imagine does not inhere as a mode in the mind itself, but only in the embodied mind, that is, a mind that is not united to the body does not possess the faculty to imagine. As a mode considered as a (...)
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  20.  11
    From Ethics to Ethics: Combatting Dangers to Democracy.Lynda Stone - 2019 - Ethics and Education 14 (2):143-156.
    ABSTRACTThis article posits an interpersonal ethical commitment to combat dangers to democracy in current times. Largely within an American context, two complementary pillars of ethics are presented. The first is from Nel Noddings and the ethics of care and the second developed primarily from Richard Rorty in a neo-pragmatist view. The contexts of present dangers, worldwide, especially in the USA, and then of this nation’s schooling, situate the ethics. A suggestion for teachers, students, and their schools as ‘citizen educators’ to (...)
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  21.  30
    Who—or What—Are the Rats (and Mice) in the Laboratory.Lynda Birke - 2003 - Society and Animals 11 (3):207-224.
    This paper explores the many meanings attached to the designation,"the rodent in the laboratory". Generations of selective breeding have created these rodents. They now differ markedly from their wild progenitors, nonhuman animals associated with carrying all kinds of diseases.Through selective breeding, they have moved from the rats of the sewers to become standardized laboratory tools and saviors of humans in the fight against disease. This paper sketches two intertwined strands of metaphors associated with laboratory rodents.The first focuses on the idea (...)
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  22. Libertarian Accounts of Free Will.Randolph Clarke - 2003 - Oxford University Press USA.
    This comprehensive study offers a balanced assessment of libertarian accounts of free will. Bringing to bear recent work on action, causation, and causal explanation, Clarke defends a type of event-causal view from popular objections concerning rationality and diminished control. He subtly explores the extent to which event-causal accounts can secure the things for the sake of which we value free will, judging their success here to be limited. Clarke then sets out a highly original agent-causal account, one that (...)
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  23. Disavowing Community.Lynda Stone - forthcoming - Philosophy of Education.
  24. The Heart of the Matter: Animal Bodies, Ethics, and Species Boundaries.Lynda Birke & Mike Michael - 1998 - Society and Animals 6 (3):245-261.
    This article addresses some of the ways in which the development of xenotransplantation, the use of nonhuman animals as organ donors, are presented in media accounts. Although xenotransplantation raises many ethical and philosophical questions, media coverage typically minimizes these. At issue are widespread public concerns about the transgression of species boundaries, particularly those between humans and other animals. We consider how these are constructed in media narratives, and how those narratives, in turn, rely on particular scientific discourses that posit species (...)
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  25.  19
    Greek Studies in England 1700–1830. By M. L. Clarke. Pp. 255. Cambridge: University Press. 1945. 18s.A. M. Woodward & M. L. Clarke - 1945 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 65:116-116.
  26.  36
    Rousseau and Modern Feminism.Lynda Lange - 1981 - Social Theory and Practice 7 (3):245-277.
  27.  4
    Who—or What—is the Laboratory Rat (and Mouse).Lynda Birke - 2003 - Society and Animals 11 (3):207-224.
    This paper explores the many meanings attached to the designation,"the rodent in the laboratory". Generations of selective breeding have created these rodents. They now differ markedly from their wild progenitors, nonhuman animals associated with carrying all kinds of diseases.Through selective breeding, they have moved from the rats of the sewers to become standardized laboratory tools and saviors of humans in the fight against disease. This paper sketches two intertwined strands of metaphors associated with laboratory rodents.The first focuses on the idea (...)
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  28. What is the Benacerraf Problem?Justin Clarke-Doane - 2017 - In Fabrice Pataut (ed.), New Perspectives on the Philosophy of Paul Benacerraf: Truth, Objects, Infinity. Springer Verlag.
    In "Mathematical Truth", Paul Benacerraf articulated an epistemological problem for mathematical realism. His formulation of the problem relied on a causal theory of knowledge which is now widely rejected. But it is generally agreed that Benacerraf was onto a genuine problem for mathematical realism nevertheless. Hartry Field describes it as the problem of explaining the reliability of our mathematical beliefs, realistically construed. In this paper, I argue that the Benacerraf Problem cannot be made out. There simply is no intelligible problem (...)
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  29.  20
    Brill Online Books and Journals.Lynda Birke - 2003 - Society and Animals 11 (3):207-224.
    This paper explores the many meanings attached to the designation,"the rodent in the laboratory". Generations of selective breeding have created these rodents. They now differ markedly from their wild progenitors, nonhuman animals associated with carrying all kinds of diseases.Through selective breeding, they have moved from the rats of the sewers to become standardized laboratory tools and saviors of humans in the fight against disease. This paper sketches two intertwined strands of metaphors associated with laboratory rodents.The first focuses on the idea (...)
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  30. The Problem of Biological Individuality.Ellen Clarke - 2010 - Biological Theory 5 (4):312-325.
    Darwin’s classic ‘Origin of Species’ (Darwin 1859) described forces of selection acting upon individuals, but there remains a great deal of controversy about what exactly the status and definition of a biological individual is. Recently some authors have argued that the individual is dispensable – that an inability to pin it down is not problematic because little rests on it anyway. The aim of this paper is to show that there is a real problem of biological individuality, and an urgent (...)
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  31.  13
    From Technologization to Totalization in Education Research: US Graduate Training, Methodology, and Critique.Lynda Stone - 2006 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 40 (4):527–545.
  32.  52
    Clarke Against Spinoza on the Manifest Diversity of the World.Timothy Yenter - 2014 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (2):260-280.
    Samuel Clarke was one of Spinoza's earliest and fiercest opponents in England. I uncover three related Clarkean arguments against Spinoza's metaphysic that deserve more attention from readers today. Collectively, these arguments draw out a tension at the very heart of Spinoza's rationalist system. From the conjunction of a necessary being who acts necessarily and the principle of sufficient reason, Clarke reasons that there could be none of the diversity we find in the universe. In doing so, Clarke (...)
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  33. Beyond the Icon: Core Cognition and the Bounds of Perception.Sam Clarke - forthcoming - Mind and Language.
    This paper refines a controversial proposal: that core systems belong to a perceptual kind, marked out by the format of its representational outputs. Following Susan Carey, this proposal has been understood in terms of core representations having an iconic format, like certain paradigmatically perceptual outputs. I argue that they don’t, but suggest that the proposal may be better formulated in terms of a broader analogue format type. Formulated in this way, the proposal accommodates the existence of genuine icons in perception, (...)
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  34. Cognitive Penetration and Informational Encapsulation: Have We Been Failing the Module?Sam Clarke - forthcoming - Philosophical Studies.
    Jerry Fodor deemed informational encapsulation ‘the essence’ of a system’s modularity and argued that human perceptual processing comprises modular systems, thus construed. Nowadays, his conclusion is widely challenged. Often, this is because experimental work is seen to somehow demonstrate the cognitive penetrability of perceptual processing, where this is assumed to conflict with the informational encapsulation of perceptual systems. Here, I deny the conflict, proposing that cognitive penetration need not have any straightforward bearing on (a) the conjecture that perceptual processing is (...)
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  35.  40
    Samuel Clarke.Timothy Yenter & Ezio Vailati - 2018 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    First published Sat Apr 5, 2003; most recent substantive revision Wed Aug 22, 2018. -/- Samuel Clarke (1675–1729) was the most influential British philosopher in the generation between Locke and Berkeley. His philosophical interests were mostly in metaphysics, theology, and ethics.
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  36.  20
    Clarke's Rejection of Superadded Gravity in the Clarke-Collins Correspondence.L. B. Wolf - 2019 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 36 (3):237-255.
    In the past, experts have disagreed about whether Samuel Clarke accepted the idea that gravity is a power superadded to matter by God. Most scholars now agree that Clarke did not support superaddition. But the argumentation employed by Clarke to reject superaddition has not been studied before in detail. In this paper, I explicate Clarke's argumentation by relating it to an important discussion about the possibility of superadded gravity in the Clarke-Collins correspondence. I examine (...)'s responses to Collins and draw on his other works to reconstruct Clarke's reasons for rejecting superadded gravity. (shrink)
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  37. Morality and Mathematics: The Evolutionary Challenge.Justin Clarke-Doane - 2012 - Ethics 122 (2):313-340.
    It is commonly suggested that evolutionary considerations generate an epistemological challenge for moral realism. At first approximation, the challenge for the moral realist is to explain our having many true moral beliefs, given that those beliefs are the products of evolutionary forces that would be indifferent to the moral truth. An important question surrounding this challenge is the extent to which it generalizes. In particular, it is of interest whether the Evolutionary Challenge for moral realism is equally a challenge for (...)
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  38. Belief Is Credence One (in Context).Roger Clarke - 2013 - Philosophers' Imprint 13:1-18.
    This paper argues for two theses: that degrees of belief are context sensitive; that outright belief is belief to degree 1. The latter thesis is rejected quickly in most discussions of the relationship between credence and belief, but the former thesis undermines the usual reasons for doing so. Furthermore, identifying belief with credence 1 allows nice solutions to a number of problems for the most widely-held view of the relationship between credence and belief, the threshold view. I provide a sketch (...)
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  39. Mechanisms and the Evidence Hierarchy.Brendan Clarke, Donald Gillies, Phyllis Illari, Federica Russo & Jon Williamson - 2014 - Topoi 33 (2):339-360.
    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) makes use of explicit procedures for grading evidence for causal claims. Normally, these procedures categorise evidence of correlation produced by statistical trials as better evidence for a causal claim than evidence of mechanisms produced by other methods. We argue, in contrast, that evidence of mechanisms needs to be viewed as complementary to, rather than inferior to, evidence of correlation. In this paper we first set out the case for treating evidence of mechanisms alongside evidence of correlation in (...)
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  40.  13
    Identifying Global Health Competencies to Prepare 21st Century Global Health Professionals: Report From the Global Health Competency Subcommittee of the Consortium of Universities for Global Health.Lynda Wilson, Brian Callender, Thomas L. Hall, Kristen Jogerst, Herica Torres & Anvar Velji - 2014 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (S2):26-31.
  41. The Universe as Journey, Conversations with W. Norris Clarke, S. J.W. Norris Clarke & Gerald A. McCool (eds.) - 1988 - Fordham University Press.
    W. Norris Clarke's metaphysics of the universe as a journey rests on six major positions: the unrestricted dynamism of the mind, the primacy of the act of existence, the participation structure of reality, and the person, considered as both the starting point of philosophy and the source of the categories needed for a flexible contemporary metaphysics. Reflecting on his conscious life and the universe around him, the finite person mounts by a two-fold path to its Infinite source, who, though (...)
     
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  42. Moral Epistemology: The Mathematics Analogy.Justin Clarke-Doane - 2014 - Noûs 48 (2):238-255.
    There is a long tradition comparing moral knowledge to mathematical knowledge. In this paper, I discuss apparent similarities and differences between knowledge in the two areas, realistically conceived. I argue that many of these are only apparent, while others are less philosophically significant than might be thought. The picture that emerges is surprising. There are definitely differences between epistemological arguments in the two areas. However, these differences, if anything, increase the plausibility of moral realism as compared to mathematical realism. It (...)
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  43.  45
    Crisis of the Educated Subject: Insight From Kristeva for American Education.Lynda Stone - 2004 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 23 (2/3):103-116.
    The contemporary crisis in AmericanEducation that has resulted in Bush sponsoredfederal legislation for accountability andstandardized testing is the setting for anessay introducing the work of Frenchphilosopher, Julia Kristeva. The comparison isbetween an ``educated subject'' that might wellcome to be constituted in schooling at presentand a ``subject-in-process.'' In a strikinglydifferent vision of human potential, the latterindividual, with open-ended, non-perfectdevelopment, entails the possibility ofpersonal, societal and educational change.Kristeva's theory, based greatly in areinterpretation of Freud, and incorporatingthe semiotic, abjection and love, and revolt (...)
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  44.  25
    Break with Tradition: Marshall's Contribution to a Foucauldian Philosophy of Education.Lynda Stone - 2005 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (3):441–447.
    James Marshall's work on Foucault exemplifies a break with tradition in philosophy of education and if taken appropriately as a new methodology, a new logic, portends a different future for the field. This article begins from a misunderstanding of Marshall. It then posits Marshall as situated in a particular Foucauldian root: a logic break out of Bachelard, Canguilhem and Foucault. From them a different understanding of ‘concept’ is offered as a break with the analytic tradition in philosophy and philosophy of (...)
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  45.  5
    Being Passionate to Perform: The Joint Effect of Leader Humility and Follower Humility.Huiyue Diao, Lynda Jiwen Song, Yue Wang & Jun Zhong - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  46.  12
    Do Higher Education Computing Degree Courses Develop the Level of Moral Judgement Required From a Profession?Lynda Holland - 2011 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 9 (2):116-126.
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  47. Dispositions, Abilities to Act, and Free Will: The New Dispositionalism.Randolph Clarke - 2009 - Mind 118 (470):323-351.
    This paper examines recent attempts to revive a classic compatibilist position on free will, according to which having an ability to perform a certain action is having a certain disposition. Since having unmanifested dispositions is compatible with determinism, having unexercised abilities to act, it is held, is likewise compatible. Here it is argued that although there is a kind of capacity to act possession of which is a matter of having a disposition, the new dispositionalism leaves unresolved the main points (...)
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  48.  25
    Educational Reform Through an Ethic of Performativity: Introducing the Special Issue.Lynda Stone - 1999 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 18 (5):299-307.
    Serving as an introduction to the special issue of Studies in Philosophy and Education, “Philosophical Transgressions: Performativity and Performance for Education,” this paper situates the papers that follow in its own performative analysis, especially utilizing the insights of Jean-François Lyotard. From him two ideas are salient, one his conception of knowledge as performance and the other the aesthetic that is a reformist response.
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  49.  39
    Meddling with Medusa: On Genetic Manipulation, Art and Animals. [REVIEW]Lynda Birke - 2006 - AI and Society 20 (1):103-117.
    Turning animals into art through genetic manipulation poses many questions for how we think about our relationship with other species. Here, I explore three rather disparate sets of issues. First, I ask to what extent the production of such living “artforms” really is as transgressive as advocates claim. Whether or not it counts as radical in terms of art I cannot say: but it is not at all radical, I argue, in terms of how we think about our human place (...)
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  50.  26
    Aristotle and the Eleatic One.Timothy Clarke - 2019 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    In this book Timothy Clarke examines Aristotle's response to Eleatic monism, the theory of Parmenides of Elea and his followers that reality is 'one'. Clarke argues that Aristotle interprets the Eleatics as thoroughgoing monists, for whom the pluralistic, changing world of the senses is a mere illusion. Understood in this way, the Eleatic theory constitutes a radical challenge to the possibility of natural philosophy. Aristotle discusses the Eleatics in several works, including De Caelo, De Generatione et Corruptione, and (...)
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