Results for 'Lynda Haas'

531 found
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  1.  8
    Of Waters and Women: The Philosophy of Luce Irigaray.Lynda Haas - 1993 - Hypatia 8 (4):150-159.
    This article reviews three recent books that enhance our understanding of the work of French feminist Luce Irigaray: Marine Lover of Friedrich Nietzsche and The Irigaray Reader, and Philosophy in the Feminine, a commentary on Irigaray's work by Margaret Whitford. The author emphasizes a dynamic reading of Irigaray's philosophy and integrates theoretical concepts with poetic/utopian passages from the works.
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  2.  41
    Review: Of Waters and Women: The Philosophy of Luce Irigaray. [REVIEW]Lynda Haas - 1993 - Hypatia 8 (4):150 - 159.
    This article reviews three recent books that enhance our understanding of the work of French feminist Luce Irigaray: Marine Lover of Friedrich Nietzsche and The Irigaray Reader (both by Irigaray), and Philosophy in the Feminine, a commentary on Irigaray's work by Margaret Whitford. The author emphasizes a dynamic reading of Irigaray's philosophy and integrates theoretical concepts with poetic/utopian passages from the works.
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  3.  2
    Biology is a Feminist Issue: Interview with Lynda Birke.Lynda Birke & Cecilia Åsberg - 2010 - European Journal of Women's Studies 17 (4):413-423.
    This is an interview with Professor Lynda Birke, one of the key figures of feminist science studies. She is a pioneer of feminist biology and of materialist feminist thought, as well as of the new and emerging field of hum-animal studies. This interview was conducted over email in two time periods, in the spring of 2008 and 2010. The format allowed for comments on previous writings and an engagement in an open-ended dialogue. Professor Birke talks about her key arguments (...)
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  4.  11
    Feminism, Animals, and Science: The Naming of the Shrew.Lynda I. A. Birke - 1994 - Open University Press.
    The book then addresses the human/animal opposition implicit in much feminist theorizing, arguing that the opposition helps to maintain the essentialism that feminists have so often criticized. The final chapter brings us back from ideas of what 'the animal' is, to ask how these questions might relate to environmental politics, including ecofeminism and animal rights.
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  5.  7
    Feminism and the Biological Body.Lynda I. A. Birke - 2000 - Rutgers University Press.
    Birke, a feminist biologist who has written extensively on the connections between feminism and science, seeks to bridge the gap between feminist cultural analysis and science by looking "inside" the body, using ideas in anatomy and physiology to develop the feminist view that the biological body is socially and culturally constructed. She rejects the assumption that the body's functioning is fixed and unchanging, claiming that biological science offers more than just a deterministic narrative of how nature works. Annotation copyrighted by (...)
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  6.  18
    Controversies in Science.Lynda Dunlop & Fernanda Veneu - 2019 - Science & Education 28 (6-7):689-710.
    Controversies in science are an essential feature of scientific practice: defined here as current problems that are unresolved because there are no accepted procedures by which they can be resolved or there are differing assumptions that affect the interpretation of evidence. Although there has been much attention in science education literature addressing socio-scientific and historical controversies in science, less has been paid to the teaching of contemporary scientific controversies. Using semi-structured qualitative interviews with 18 teachers at different career stages in (...)
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  7. The Heart of the Matter: Animal Bodies, Ethics, and Species Boundaries.Lynda Birke & Mike Michael - 1998 - Society and Animals 6 (3):245-261.
    This article addresses some of the ways in which the development of xenotransplantation, the use of nonhuman animals as organ donors, are presented in media accounts. Although xenotransplantation raises many ethical and philosophical questions, media coverage typically minimizes these. At issue are widespread public concerns about the transgression of species boundaries, particularly those between humans and other animals. We consider how these are constructed in media narratives, and how those narratives, in turn, rely on particular scientific discourses that posit species (...)
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  8.  13
    Identifying Global Health Competencies to Prepare 21st Century Global Health Professionals: Report From the Global Health Competency Subcommittee of the Consortium of Universities for Global Health.Lynda Wilson, Brian Callender, Thomas L. Hall, Kristen Jogerst, Herica Torres & Anvar Velji - 2014 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (S2):26-31.
  9. Talking About Horses: Control and Freedom in the World of "Natural Horsemanship".Lynda Birke - 2008 - Society and Animals 16 (2):107-126.
    This paper explores how horses are represented in the discourses of "natural horsemanship" , an approach to training and handling horses that advocates see as better than traditional methods. In speaking about their horses, NH enthusiasts move between two registers: On one hand, they use a quasi-scientific narrative, relying on terms and ideas drawn from ethology, to explain the instinctive behavior of horses. Within this mode of narrative, the horse is "other" and must be understood through the human learning to (...)
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  10.  68
    The Horse’s Tale: Narratives of Caring for/About Horses.Lynda Birke, Joanna Hockenhull & Emma Creighton - 2010 - Society and Animals 18 (4):331-347.
    In this paper, we report on a study of people who keep horses for leisure riding; the study was based on a qualitative analysis of written comments made by people keeping horses, focusing on how they care for them and how they describe horse behavior. These commentaries followed participation in an online survey investigating management practices. The responses clustered around two significant themes: the first centered around people’s methods of caring for their animal and the dependence of such care upon (...)
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  11.  5
    Being Passionate to Perform: The Joint Effect of Leader Humility and Follower Humility.Huiyue Diao, Lynda Jiwen Song, Yue Wang & Jun Zhong - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  12.  65
    Did Plotinus and Porphyry Disagree on Aristotle's Categories?Frans De Haas - 2001 - Phronesis 46 (4):492-526.
    In this paper I propose a reading of Plotinus Enneads VI.1-3 [41-43] On the genera of being which regards this treatise as a coherent whole in which Aristotle's Categories is explored in a way that turns it into a decisive contribution to Plotinus' Platonic ontology. In addition, I claim that Porphyry's Isagoge and commentaries on the Categories start by adopting Plotinus' point of view, including his notion of genus, and proceed by explaining its consequences for a more detailed reading of (...)
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  13.  38
    Rousseau and Modern Feminism.Lynda Lange - 1981 - Social Theory and Practice 7 (3):245-277.
  14.  42
    Learning to Speak Horse": The Culture of "Natural Horsemanship.Lynda Birke - 2007 - Society and Animals 15 (3):217-239.
    This paper examines the rise of what is popularly called "natural horsemanship" , as a definitive cultural change within the horse industry. Practitioners are often evangelical about their methods, portraying NH as a radical departure from traditional methods. In doing so, they create a clear demarcation from the practices and beliefs of the conventional horse-world. Only NH, advocates argue, properly understands the horse. Dissenters, however, contest the benefits to horses as well as the reliance in NH on disputed concepts of (...)
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  15.  33
    Intimate Familiarities? Feminism and Human-Animal Studies.Lynda Birke - 2002 - Society and Animals 10 (4):429-436.
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  16.  36
    Burnt Offerings to Rationality: A Feminist Reading of the Construction of Indigenous Peoples in Enrique Dussel's Theory of Modernity.Lynda Lange - 1998 - Hypatia 13 (3):132 - 145.
    The philosopher Enrique Dussel offers a critical analysis of European construction of indigenous peoples which he calls "transmodern." His theory is especially relevant to feminist and other concerns about the potential disabling effects of postmodern approaches for political action and the development of theory. Dussel divides modernity into two concurrent paradigms. Reflection on them suggests that modernism and postmodernism should not be too strongly distinguished. In conclusion, his approach is compared with that of Mohanty.
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  17.  61
    Descartes’s Conception of Mind Through the Prism of Imagination: Cartesian Substance Dualism Questioned.Lynda Gaudemard - 2018 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie:146-171.
    The aim of this article is to clarify an aspect of Descartes’s conception of mind that seriously impacts on the standard objections against Cartesian dualism. By a close reading of Descartes’s writings on imagination, I argue that the capacity to imagine does not inhere as a mode in the mind itself, but only in the embodied mind, that is, a mind that is not united to the body does not possess the faculty to imagine. As a mode considered as a (...)
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  18. Disavowing Community.Lynda Stone - forthcoming - Philosophy of Education.
  19.  28
    Socrates in the Schools From Scotland to Texas: Replicating a Study on the Effects of a Philosophy for Children Program.Frank Fair, Lory E. Haas, Carol Gardosik, Daphne D. Johnson, Debra P. Price & Olena Leipnik - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 2 (1):18-37.
    In this article we report the findings of a randomised control clinical trial that assessed the impact of a Philosophy for Children program and replicated a previous study conducted in Scotland by Topping and Trickey. A Cognitive Abilities Test was administered as a pretest and a posttest to randomly selected experimental groups and control groups. The students in the experimental group engaged in philosophy lessons in a setting of structured, collaborative inquiry in their language arts classes for one hour per (...)
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  20.  37
    Who—or What—Are the Rats (and Mice) in the Laboratory.Lynda Birke - 2003 - Society and Animals 11 (3):207-224.
    This paper explores the many meanings attached to the designation,"the rodent in the laboratory". Generations of selective breeding have created these rodents. They now differ markedly from their wild progenitors, nonhuman animals associated with carrying all kinds of diseases.Through selective breeding, they have moved from the rats of the sewers to become standardized laboratory tools and saviors of humans in the fight against disease. This paper sketches two intertwined strands of metaphors associated with laboratory rodents.The first focuses on the idea (...)
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  21.  12
    From Ethics to Ethics: Combatting Dangers to Democracy.Lynda Stone - 2019 - Ethics and Education 14 (2):143-156.
    ABSTRACTThis article posits an interpersonal ethical commitment to combat dangers to democracy in current times. Largely within an American context, two complementary pillars of ethics are presented. The first is from Nel Noddings and the ethics of care and the second developed primarily from Richard Rorty in a neo-pragmatist view. The contexts of present dangers, worldwide, especially in the USA, and then of this nation’s schooling, situate the ethics. A suggestion for teachers, students, and their schools as ‘citizen educators’ to (...)
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  22.  17
    De Haas-van Alphen Effect and Fermi Surface of the Intermetallic Compounds AuAl2, AuGa2and AuIn2.J. -P. Jan, W. B. Pearson, Y. Saito, M. Springford & I. M. Templeton - 1965 - Philosophical Magazine 12 (120):1271-1291.
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  23.  21
    Interpreting Aristotle’s Posterior Analytics in Late Antiquity and Beyond.Frans A. J. de Haas, Mariska Leunissen & Marije Martijn (eds.) - 2010 - Brill.
    This volume collects Late Ancient, Byzantine and Medieval appropriations of Aristotle's Posterior Analytics, addressing the logic of inquiry, concept formation, the question whether metaphysics is a science, and the theory of demonstration.
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  24. Ethical Dimensions of Political Advertising.Lynda Lee Kaid - 1991 - In Robert E. Denton (ed.), Ethical Dimensions of Political Communication. Praeger.
     
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  25.  54
    The Financial Crisis and the Systemic Failure of the Economics Profession.David Colander, Michael Goldberg, Armin Haas, Katarina Juselius, Alan Kirman, Thomas Lux & Brigitte Sloth - 2009 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 21 (2-3):249-267.
    ABSTRACT Economists not only failed to anticipate the financial crisis; they may have contributed to it?with risk and derivatives models that, through spurious precision and untested theoretical assumptions, encouraged policy makers and market participants to see more stability and risk sharing than was actually present. Moreover, once the crisis occurred, it was met with incomprehension by most economists because of models that, on the one hand, downplay the possibility that economic actors may exhibit highly interactive behavior; and, on the other, (...)
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  26.  55
    The Theory of Translation.W. Haas - 1962 - Philosophy 37 (141):208 - 228.
    To translate is one thing; to say how we do it, is another. The practice is familiar enough, and there are familiar theories of it. But when we try to look more closely, theory tends to obscure rather than explain, and the familiar practice—an ancient practice, without which Western civilisation is unthinkable—appears to be just baffling, its very possibility a mystery.
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  27.  13
    Do Higher Education Computing Degree Courses Develop the Level of Moral Judgement Required From a Profession?Lynda Holland - 2011 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 9 (2):116-126.
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  28.  34
    Socrates in the Schools From Scotland to Texas: Replicating a Study on the Effects of a Philosophy for Children Program.Frank Fair, Lory E. Haas, Carol Gardoski, Daphne Johnson, Debra Price & Olena Leipnik - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 2 (1).
    In this article we report the findings of a randomised control clinical trial that assessed the impact of a Philosophy for Children program and replicated a previous study conducted in Scotland by Topping and Trickey. A Cognitive Abilities Test was administered as a pretest and a posttest to randomly selected experimental groups and control groups. The students in the experimental group engaged in philosophy lessons in a setting of structured, collaborative inquiry in their language arts classes for one hour per (...)
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  29.  54
    The Problems with Forbidding Science.Gary E. Marchant & Lynda L. Pope - 2009 - Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (3):375-394.
    Scientific research is subject to a number of regulations which impose incidental (time, place), rather than substantive (type of research), restrictions on scientific research and the knowledge created through such research. In recent years, however, the premise that scientific research and knowledge should be free from substantive regulation has increasingly been called into question. Some have suggested that the law should be used as a tool to substantively restrict research which is dual-use in nature or which raises moral objections. There (...)
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  30.  87
    John Philoponus' New Definition of Prime Matter: Aspects of its Background in Neoplatonism and the Ancient Commentary Tradition.Frans A. J. de Haas (ed.) - 1996 - E.J. Brill.
    This is the first full discussion of Philoponus' account of matter.
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  31.  5
    Who—or What—is the Laboratory Rat (and Mouse).Lynda Birke - 2003 - Society and Animals 11 (3):207-224.
    This paper explores the many meanings attached to the designation,"the rodent in the laboratory". Generations of selective breeding have created these rodents. They now differ markedly from their wild progenitors, nonhuman animals associated with carrying all kinds of diseases.Through selective breeding, they have moved from the rats of the sewers to become standardized laboratory tools and saviors of humans in the fight against disease. This paper sketches two intertwined strands of metaphors associated with laboratory rodents.The first focuses on the idea (...)
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  32.  24
    Brill Online Books and Journals.Lynda Birke - 2003 - Society and Animals 11 (3):207-224.
    This paper explores the many meanings attached to the designation,"the rodent in the laboratory". Generations of selective breeding have created these rodents. They now differ markedly from their wild progenitors, nonhuman animals associated with carrying all kinds of diseases.Through selective breeding, they have moved from the rats of the sewers to become standardized laboratory tools and saviors of humans in the fight against disease. This paper sketches two intertwined strands of metaphors associated with laboratory rodents.The first focuses on the idea (...)
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  33.  9
    Socrates in the Schools: Gains at Three-Year Follow-Up.Frank Fair, Lory E. Haas, Carol Gardosik, Daphne Johnson, Debra Price & Olena Leipnik - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 2 (2).
    Three recent research reports by Topping and Trickey, by Fair and colleagues, and by Gorard, Siddiqui and Huat See have produced data that support the conclusion that a Philosophy for Children program of one-hour-per-week structured discussions has a marked positive impact on students. This article presents data from a follow up study done three years after the completion of the study reported in Fair et al.. The data show that the positive gains in scores on the Cognitive Abilities Test were (...)
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  34.  13
    From Technologization to Totalization in Education Research: US Graduate Training, Methodology, and Critique.Lynda Stone - 2006 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 40 (4):527–545.
  35.  59
    Journeys Together: Horses and Humans in Partnership.Jo Hockenhull & Lynda Birke - 2015 - Society and Animals 23 (1):81-100.
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  36. The Discriminating Capacity of the Soul in Aristotle's Theory of Learning.Frans A. J. De Haas - 2005 - In Ricardo Salles (ed.), Metaphysics, Soul, and Ethics in Ancient Thought: Themes From the Work of Richard Sorabji. Clarendon Press.
     
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  37.  16
    Zoroastrian Ethics.George C. O. Haas - 1923 - Journal of Philosophy 20 (16):445-446.
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  38.  45
    Crisis of the Educated Subject: Insight From Kristeva for American Education.Lynda Stone - 2004 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 23 (2/3):103-116.
    The contemporary crisis in AmericanEducation that has resulted in Bush sponsoredfederal legislation for accountability andstandardized testing is the setting for anessay introducing the work of Frenchphilosopher, Julia Kristeva. The comparison isbetween an ``educated subject'' that might wellcome to be constituted in schooling at presentand a ``subject-in-process.'' In a strikinglydifferent vision of human potential, the latterindividual, with open-ended, non-perfectdevelopment, entails the possibility ofpersonal, societal and educational change.Kristeva's theory, based greatly in areinterpretation of Freud, and incorporatingthe semiotic, abjection and love, and revolt (...)
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  39.  25
    Break with Tradition: Marshall's Contribution to a Foucauldian Philosophy of Education.Lynda Stone - 2005 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (3):441–447.
    James Marshall's work on Foucault exemplifies a break with tradition in philosophy of education and if taken appropriately as a new methodology, a new logic, portends a different future for the field. This article begins from a misunderstanding of Marshall. It then posits Marshall as situated in a particular Foucauldian root: a logic break out of Bachelard, Canguilhem and Foucault. From them a different understanding of ‘concept’ is offered as a break with the analytic tradition in philosophy and philosophy of (...)
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  40.  20
    Animals in Experimental Reports: The Rhetoric of Science.Jane Smith & Lynda Birke - 1995 - Society and Animals 3 (1):23-42.
    In this paper, we analyze the ways in which the use of animals is described in the "Methods" sections of scientific papers. We focus particularly on aspects of the language of scientific narrative and what it conveys to the reader about the animals. Scientific writing, for example, tends to omit details of how the animals are cared for. Perhaps more importantly, it is constructed in ways that tend to minimize what is happening to the animal; thus, animal death is obscured (...)
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  41.  13
    Working Memory Updating and the Development of Rule-Guided Behavior.Dima Amso, Sara Haas, Lauren McShane & David Badre - 2014 - Cognition 133 (1):201-210.
  42.  6
    7 Man: Woman.Lynda Johnston - 2005 - In Paul J. Cloke & R. J. Johnston (eds.), Spaces of Geographical Thought: Deconstructing Human Geography's Binaries. Sage Publications. pp. 119.
  43.  20
    Syntax and Semantics of Ordinary Language.Czesław Lejewski & William Haas - 1975 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 49 (1):127 - 169.
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  44. Is Synchronic Self-Control Possible?Julia Haas - 2020 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 12 (2):397-424.
    An agent exercises instrumental rationality to the degree that she adopts appropriate means to achieving her ends. Adopting appropriate means to achieving one’s ends can, in turn, involve overcoming one’s strongest desires, that is, it can involve exercising synchronic self-control. However, contra prominent approaches, I deny that synchronic self-control is possible. Specifically, I draw on computational models and empirical evidence from cognitive neuroscience to describe a naturalistic, multi-system model of the mind. On this model, synchronic self-control is impossible. Must we, (...)
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  45.  59
    The Corporate Social Performance Content of Innovation in the U.K.Stephen Pavelin & Lynda A. Porter - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 80 (4):711-725.
    This article investigates the influence of innovation on the relationship between corporate strategy and social issues. Specifically, we employ firm-level data for a large sample of U.K. companies drawn from a diverse range of industrial sectors to investigate, given innovation, the determinants of both the probability that the innovation brings reduced environmental impacts and/or improved health and safety, and the strength of this effect. In this connection, we find evidence of a dichotomy between product and process innovations, and roles for (...)
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  46.  25
    Educational Reform Through an Ethic of Performativity: Introducing the Special Issue.Lynda Stone - 1999 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 18 (5):299-307.
    Serving as an introduction to the special issue of Studies in Philosophy and Education, “Philosophical Transgressions: Performativity and Performance for Education,” this paper situates the papers that follow in its own performative analysis, especially utilizing the insights of Jean-François Lyotard. From him two ideas are salient, one his conception of knowledge as performance and the other the aesthetic that is a reformist response.
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  47.  1
    Accounting for Animal Experiments: Identity and Disreputable "Others".Lynda Birke & Mike Michael - 1994 - Science, Technology and Human Values 19 (2):189-204.
    This article considers how scientists involved in animal experimentation attempt to defend their practices. Interviews with over 40 scientists revealed that, over and above direct criticisms of the antivivisection lobby, scientists used a number of discursive strategies to demonstrate that critics of animal experimentation are ethically and epistemologically infenor to British scientific practitioners. The scientists portrayed a series of negative "others" such as foreign scientists, farmers, and pet owners. In this manner, they attempted to create a "socioethical domain" which rhetorically (...)
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  48.  40
    Meddling with Medusa: On Genetic Manipulation, Art and Animals. [REVIEW]Lynda Birke - 2006 - AI and Society 20 (1):103-117.
    Turning animals into art through genetic manipulation poses many questions for how we think about our relationship with other species. Here, I explore three rather disparate sets of issues. First, I ask to what extent the production of such living “artforms” really is as transgressive as advocates claim. Whether or not it counts as radical in terms of art I cannot say: but it is not at all radical, I argue, in terms of how we think about our human place (...)
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  49.  11
    Who has a Vasectomy Reversal?Lynda Clarke & Sue Gregson - 1986 - Journal of Biosocial Science 18 (3):253-259.
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  50.  4
    From Bourdieu and Wolin, `Inside and Outside the Box': A Frame for the Special Issue.Stone Lynda & Gunzenhauser Michael - 2001 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 20 (3):181-190.
    Utilizing the writings of Pierre Bourdieu and Sheldon Wolin,this paper introduces a special issue on ``Educational Rights andEntitlements.'' Its purpose is to characterize and critique `the box ofliberalism' that both advances and constrains what is conceived andenacted in education. Following it are a set of significantcontributions from the sixth biennial conference of the InternationalNetwork of Philosophers of Education, August 1998, Ankara.
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