Results for 'Lyne Tilt MacSporran'

158 found
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  1.  6
    Howe and Lyne Bully the Critics.Henry Howe & John Lyne - 1992 - Social Epistemology 6 (2):231 – 240.
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  2.  13
    Values Education in Schools: A Resource Book for Student Inquiry.Mark Freakley, Gilbert Burgh & Lyne Tilt MacSporran - 2008 - Camberwell, Vic, Australia: ACER.
    Values Education in Schools is a new resource for teachers involved in values and ethics education. It provides a range of 'practical philosophy' resources for secondary school teachers that can be used in English, religious education, citizenship, personal development and social science subjects. The materials include narratives to engage students in philosophical inquiry, doing ethics through the activity of philosophy, not simply learning about it.
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  3.  31
    Board Composition and Corporate Social Responsibility: The Role of Diversity, Gender, Strategy and Decision Making.Kathyayini Rao & Carol Tilt - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 138 (2):327-347.
    This paper aims to critically review the existing literature on the relationship between corporate governance, in particular board diversity, and both corporate social responsibility and corporate social responsibility reporting and to suggest some important avenues for future research in this field. Assuming that both CSR and CSRR are outcomes of boards’ decisions, this paper proposes that examining boards’ decision making processes with regard to CSR would provide more insight into the link between board diversity and CSR. Particularly, the paper stresses (...)
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  4.  6
    The Individual ‘We’ Narrator.Mattia Gallotti & Raphael Lyne - 2019 - British Journal of Aesthetics 59 (2):ayy051.
    The prevailing assumption in literary studies tends to be that a ‘we’ narrative voice is either that of an individual purporting to speak for a group, or that of a collective of people whose perspectives have coalesced into a unified one. Recent work on social agency across the cognitive humanities suggests another way of understanding what might be conveyed by such a ‘we’. Social cognition research shows that individuals can have their capacities changed and enhanced when they interact with others, (...)
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  5.  5
    Love and Death: Laodamia and Protesilaus in Catullus, Propertius, and Others.R. O. A. M. Lyne - 1998 - Classical Quarterly 48 (1):200-212.
    In one form or another an elevated, pleasure-transcending view of love is common, we might say natural. For readers of Latin poetry Catullus is perhaps the most impressive spokesman. In many respects, of course, Catullus is special. His particular values and choice of terminology, in his time and situation, mark him out from his crowd; in the Roman world indeed, ‘whole love’, perhaps rather its utterance, is hard to document before him. But a belief that love is powerful and profound, (...)
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  6. Reviews: Charles R. Bambach, Heidegger, Dilthey and the Crisis of Historicism. Ithaca, NY and London: Cornell University Press, 1995. Xiv+ 297 Pp. [REVIEW]Ian Lyne - 1997 - History of the Human Sciences 10 (4):111-114.
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  7.  11
    The Neoteric Poets.R. O. A. M. Lyne - 1978 - Classical Quarterly 28 (01):167-.
    In 50 B.C. Cicero writes to Atticus as follows : ‘Brundisium uenimus VII Kalend. Decembr. usi tua felicitate nauigandi; ita belle nobis flauit ab Epiro lenissimus Onchesmites. hunc si cui boles pro tuo uendito.’ The antonomasia, the euphonic sibilance, and the mannered rhythm are all prominent in Cicero's hexameter. The line is a humorously concocted example of affected and Grecizing narrative. But it is also a line which, Atticus is to suppose, would value; presumably therefore it is meant to hit (...)
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  8.  5
    Horace Odes Book 1 and the Alexandrian Edition of Alcaeus.R. O. A. M. Lyne - 2005 - Classical Quarterly 55 (02):542-558.
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  9.  11
    Contours of Intervention: How Rhetoric Matters to Biomedicine.John Lyne - 2001 - Journal of Medical Humanities 22 (1):3-13.
  10.  16
    Social Epistemology as a Rhetoric of Inquiry.John Lyne - 1994 - Argumentation 8 (2):111-124.
    Fuller's program of social epistemology engages a rhetoric of inquiry that can be usefully compared and contrasted with other discursive theories of knowledge, such as that of Richard Rorty. Resisting the model of “conversation,” Fuller strikes an activist posture and lays the groundwork for normative “knowledge policy,” in which persuasion and credibility play key roles. The image of investigation is one that overtly rejects the “storehouse” conception of knowledge and invokes the metaphors of distributive economics. Productive questions arise as to (...)
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  11.  4
    Vergil and the Politics of War.R. O. A. M. Lyne - 1983 - Classical Quarterly 33 (01):188-.
    The Romans had various ways of justifying their imperial aims and methods, some high-minded, some less so. We find in particular that they could give honourable and satisfying explanations of their aims and methods in war. Here for example is Cicero: quare suscipienda quidem bella sunt ob earn causam, ut sine iniuria in pace uiuatur; parta autem uictoria conseruandi ii, qui non crudeles in bello, non immanes fuerunt, ut maiores nostri Tusculanos, Aequos…in ciuitatem etiam acceperunt, at Carthaginem…funditus sustulerunt…mea quidem sententia (...)
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  12.  28
    Servitium Amoris.R. O. A. M. Lyne - 1979 - Classical Quarterly 29 (01):117-.
    In this paper I shall be examining the nature and provenance of what many people state or imply to be a traditional, conventional, even trite figure of speech: the Augustan Elegists' figure of the ‘seruitium amoris’’. It is indeed a very frequent image in the Elegists. As. F. O. Copley says: ‘Of all the figures used by the Roman elegists, probably none is quite so familiar as that of the lover as slave.’’ But frequency does not equal triteness nor traditionality.
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  13.  8
    Gene Talk in Sociobiology.Henry Howe & John Lyne - 1992 - Social Epistemology 6 (2):109 – 163.
    Abstract Terminology within the biological sciences gets its import not just from semantic meaning, but also from the way it functions within the rhetorics of the various disciplinary practices. The ?sociobiology? of human behavior inherits three distinct rhetorics from the genetic disciplines. Sociobiologists use population genetic, biometrical genetic, and molecular genetic rhetorics, without acknowledging the conceptual and experimental constraints that are assumed by geneticists. The eclectic blending of these three rhetorics obscures important differences of context and meaning. Sociobiologists use foundational (...)
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  14.  22
    Rickert and Heidegger: On the Value of Everyday Objects.Ian Lyne - 2000 - Kant-Studien 91 (2):204-225.
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  15.  18
    A Hard Look at Catullus David O. Ross: Style and Tradition in Catullus. Pp.Viii + 188. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press (London: Oxford University Press), 1969. Cloth, £2.90 Net. [REVIEW]R. O. A. M. Lyne - 1972 - The Classical Review 22 (01):34-37.
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  16.  12
    A Hard Look at Catullus.R. O. A. M. Lyne - 1972 - The Classical Review 22 (01):34-.
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  17.  11
    Ciris 85–6.R. O. A. M. Lyne - 1971 - The Classical Review 21 (03):323-324.
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  18.  19
    Infelix Virgo Daniel Knecht: Ciris: Authenticité, histoire du texte, édition et commentaire critiques. Pp. xc+169. Bruges: De Tempel, 1970. Cloth. [REVIEW]R. O. A. M. Lyne - 1973 - The Classical Review 23 (02):168-171.
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  19.  15
    Review. A Companion to the Study of Virgil. N Horsfall [Ed].R. Lyne - 1999 - The Classical Review 49 (2):383-384.
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  20.  12
    Love and Death: Laodamia and Protesilaus in Catullus, Propertius, and Others1.R. O. A. M. Lyne - 1998 - Classical Quarterly 48 (01):200-.
    In one form or another an elevated, pleasure-transcending view of love is common, we might say natural. For readers of Latin poetry Catullus is perhaps the most impressive spokesman. In many respects, of course, Catullus is special. His particular values and choice of terminology, in his time and situation, mark him out from his crowd; in the Roman world indeed, ‘whole love’, perhaps rather its utterance, is hard to document before him. But a belief that love is powerful and profound, (...)
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  21.  5
    Mary MacKillop and Australian Spiritual Identity.Daniel Lyne - 1995 - The Australasian Catholic Record 72 (1):44.
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  22.  4
    The Dating of the Ciris.R. O. A. M. Lyne - 1971 - Classical Quarterly 21 (01):233-.
    Once we have accepted that the Ciris stems from neither Virgil nor Gallus, but was written by a post-Virgilian poetaster, the obvious task for us is to try and formulate some more specific idea of the date of the poem. I think that it has been sufficiently proved that the Ciris is not only post-Virgilian, but post-Ovidian in origin, including as it does unquestionable imitations of that author. But this, to date, is really as far as we have got. It (...)
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  23.  2
    The Rhetoric of Science. Alan G. Gross.John Lyne - 1999 - Isis 90 (3):638-639.
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  24.  3
    Ciris 89–91.R. O. A. M. Lyne - 1975 - Classical Quarterly 25 (01):156-.
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  25.  2
    The Text of Catullus CVII.R. Lyne - 1985 - Hermes 113 (4):498-500.
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  26.  2
    Notes on Catullus.R. O. A. M. Lyne - 2002 - Classical Quarterly 52 (2):600-608.
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  27.  1
    Teeth of Mental Defectives.W. Courtney Lyne - 1936 - The Eugenics Review 28 (3):247.
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  28. Benjamin, Walter and Romanticism-the Romantic Tradition.Ian Lyne - 1995 - Philosophy Today 39 (4):391-407.
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  29. ''Husserl's' Logical Investigations': 100th Anniversary.Ian Lyne - 2000 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 31 (3):344-344.
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  30. Idealism as a Rhetorical Stance.John Lyne - 1990 - In Richard A. Cherwitz (ed.), Rhetoric and Philosophy. L. Erlbaum Associates. pp. 149--86.
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  31. Rhetoric Across the Disciplines: Rhetoric, Disciplinary, and Fields of Knowledge.John Lyne & Carolyn R. Miller - 2009 - In A. Lunsford, K. Wilson & R. Eberly (eds.), Sage Handbook of Rhetorical Studies. Sage Publications. pp. 167--74.
     
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  32. Shakespeare, Perception and Theory of Mind.Raphael Lyne - 2014 - Paragraph 37 (1):79-95.
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  33. The Dating of the Ciris.R. O. A. M. Lyne - 1971 - Classical Quarterly 21 (1):233-253.
    Once we have accepted that the Ciris stems from neither Virgil nor Gallus, but was written by a post-Virgilian poetaster, the obvious task for us is to try and formulate some more specific idea of the date of the poem. I think that it has been sufficiently proved that the Ciris is not only post-Virgilian, but post-Ovidian in origin, including as it does unquestionable imitations of that author. But this, to date, is really as far as we have got. It (...)
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  34.  3
    Walter Benjamin and Romanticism: The Romantic Tradition.Ian Lyne - 1995 - Philosophy Today 39 (4):391-407.
  35.  7
    Adaptation to a Rotated Visual Field as a Function of Degree of Optical Tilt and Exposure Time.Sheldon M. Ebenholtz - 1966 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 72 (5):629.
  36.  7
    Perception of the Vertical with Body Tilt in the Median Plane.Sheldon M. Ebenholtz - 1970 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 83 (1p1):1.
  37.  11
    Effect of Body Tilt on Apparent Verticality, Apparent Body Position, and Their Relation.Martin Bauermeister - 1964 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 67 (2):142.
  38.  10
    Readaptation and Decay After Exposure to Optical Tilt.Sheldon M. Ebenholtz - 1968 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 78 (2p1):350.
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  39.  18
    The Relationship Between the Tilt of a Visual Field and the Deviation of Body Position From the Vertical in the White Rat.Bernard F. Riess, Harold Kratka & Albert Dinnerstein - 1950 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 40 (4):531.
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  40.  18
    Tilt Adaptation and Figural After-Effect.Eric G. Heinemann & Thomas Marill - 1954 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 48 (6):468.
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  41.  13
    Experiments on Sensory-Tonic Field Theory of Perception: II. Effect of Supported and Unsupported Tilt of the Body on the Visual Perception of Verticality.Heinz Werner, Seymour Wapner & Kenneth A. Chandler - 1951 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 42 (5):346.
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  42.  11
    Development and Dissipation of a Visual Spatial Aftereffect From Prolonged Head Tilt.N. J. Wade & R. H. Day - 1968 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 76 (3p1):439.
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  43.  8
    Tilt Aftereffects in Central and Peripheral Vision.Darwin Muir & Ray Over - 1970 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 85 (2):165.
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  44.  9
    Effect of the Angle of Tilt of the Inspection Figure on the Magnitude of a Kinesthetic Aftereffect.Ray Over - 1967 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 74 (2, Pt.1):249-253.
  45.  8
    Some Evidence for a Comparator in Adaptation to Optical Tilt.Sheldon M. Ebenholtz - 1968 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 77 (1):94.
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  46.  7
    Transfer and Decay Functions in Adaptation to Optical Tilt.Sheldon M. Ebenholtz - 1969 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 81 (1):170.
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  47.  5
    Transfer of Adaptation as a Function of Interpolated Optical Tilt to the Ipsilateral and Contralateral Eye.Sheldon M. Ebenholtz - 1967 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 73 (2):263.
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  48.  5
    Effect of Forward Head Inclination on Visual Orientation During Lateral Body Tilt.N. J. Wade - 1972 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 96 (1):203.
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  49. The Classical Tilt of Justificatory Liberalism.Andrew Lister - 2013 - European Journal of Political Theory 12 (3):316-326.
    This paper is a review of Gerald Gaus's The Order of Public Reason. Its initial purpose is to explain how the overall argument of the book is meant to hang together. It also identifies four points at which the argument might be challenged, particularly as it relates to justificatory liberalism’s ‘classical tilt’.
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  50.  1
    How to Draw the Line Between Metaphoric Use and Abuse: Are Howe and Lyne Out of Line on Sociobiology?Herbert W. Simons - 1992 - Social Epistemology 6 (2):215 – 218.
    (1992). How to draw the line between metaphoric use and abuse: Are Howe and Lyne out of line on sociobiology? Social Epistemology: Vol. 6, The Rhetoric of Sociobiology, pp. 215-218. doi: 10.1080/02691729208578656.
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